The essay identifies the photographers and subjects of photographs of Canadian artists, architects, and writers in an album in the Library and Archives of the National Gallery of Canada. It looks at the photographic practices of the Montreal painter Edmond Dyonnet within the context of the Pen and Pencil Club of Montreal and of the Toronto journalist M.O. Hammond in photographing Canadian artists and writers. An inventory of the contents of the album is provided, identifying photographers and subjects, with proposed dates in an Appendix.

In the Library and Archives of the National Gallery of Canada is a photograph album inscribed on the cover in black marker, “Artists & Architects circa 1908–1918” (fig. 1). Nothing is known about its provenance, nor who assembled the album.

Fig. 1. “Artists & Architects circa 1908–1918.” National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa. Photo: NGC

The inscribed title is somewhat misleading, as the album also contains portraits of Montreal writers, in addition to Canadian artists and architects. There are a total of 109 photographs in the album,1 of which seventy-eight are portraits of members of Montreal’s Pen and Pencil Club photographed by the painter Edmond Dyonnet (1859–1954). This essay will look at Dyonnet’s project of photographing club members and associates and at the various holdings of his photographs, try to determine a chronology of these images, identify other photographs in the Gallery’s album, and propose a provenance for the Ottawa album.

Born in Crest, France in June 1859, Edmond Dyonnet first came to Canada with his family in May 1875, returning to Europe to study in Turin, Naples, and Rome. By late October 1890,2 he was back in Montreal. He soon met John Pinhey, who found a studio for Dyonnet in the Imperial Building on Place d’Armes, and by March 1893, he had moved to 1002 Dorchester Street (now boulevard René Levesque) in the top floor of a house occupied by the Ingres-Coutellier School of Languages, run by French-born Maxime Ingres.3 By June 1894, Ingres’ school had moved to the Fraser Institute, where Dyonnet also found a studio.4

The Fraser Institute would be the stage for Dyonnet’s photographic project. The Institute had been established in 1870 as a free public library, though it would not open its doors until 1885, when it acquired Burnside Hall at the northeast corner of Dorchester and University Streets. Ground floor rooms were rented out to provide additional income.5 McGill’s Faculty of Law occupied rooms from 1886 to 18956 and Otto Jacobi and Robert Harris rented studios there in 1888.7 Harris described the facilities:

[t]he Fraser Institute is a large building on the N.W. [sic] corner of Dorchester and University streets not far from Phillips Square as you will see on the plan. All the upper floor is occupied as a public library. The lower floor consists of a large hall doors out of which open into several rooms one of which is my studio. This is a sketch plan of the lower floor [(fig. 2)]. The entrance on Dorchester street is the one to the library above and a man is stationed in the hall all the time. On the door on University St Jacobi and I have our brass plates with names on.8

A photograph in the National Gallery album shows Robert Harris, Otto Jacobi, and William Brymner in Jacobi’s studio at the Fraser Institute (no. 106).

Fig. 2. Plan of the ground floor of the Fraser Institute in a letter from Robert Harris, Montreal, to his mother, Charlottetown, 19 October 1890. Robert Harris fonds, Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Charlottetown, Gift of the Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAG H-4538)

The Pen and Pencil Club was established to bring together artists and writers for “social enjoyment and promotion of the Arts and Letters.” The first meeting was held on 5 March 1890 at the home of the painter William Hope and was attended by the artists Hope, William Brymner, and Robert Harris, the writers John Try-Davies and John E. Logan, and the Fraser Institute librarian R.W. Boodle.9 At the subsequent meeting they were joined by John Pinhey and the architect A.T. Taylor, the McGill professors S.E. Dawson, C.E. Moyse, and Paul Lafleur, and the lawyer Norman Rielle, and on 29 March, Otto Jacobi and Forbes Torrance added to their number. Membership was limited to thirty, and to men only, and by December 1892 a complement of twenty-seven artists and writers had been reached.10 Among the members were both professional and amateur artists, such as the financier William Van Horne, the lawyer Kenneth R. Macpherson, and the businessman Charles Porteous, and writers whose professions included lawyer, professor, doctor, and stockbroker. Meeting every two weeks, fall through spring, the members selected subjects to be interpreted in compositions, verse, or prose at the subsequent meeting. The mingling of the arts resulted in several cooperative publications, including John Try-Davies’ A Semi-detached house and other stories (Montreal: J. Lovell, 1900), illustrated by Robert Harris and dedicated to the club, and E.B. Brownlow’s Orphans and other poems and John E. Logan’s Verses, published by the club in 1896 and 1916, respectively. The atmosphere was dominated by intelligence, creative energy, and good humour, as evidenced by the annual end-of-season celebration of “unrecognized genius.” Several Pen and Pencil Club members were also active in the affairs of the Fraser Institute, most notably William McLennan, who was the Institute’s president from 1898 to 1902.11

Dyonnet attended his first meeting of the Pen and Pencil Club on 24 January 1891, when he was nominated for membership by William Brymner. Elected two weeks later, Dyonnet would be a prominent figure in the Club for the next sixty years. He was elected Vice-President in November 1894, President the following year, and Treasurer from 1903 to 1913, from 1916 to 1937, and from 1940 to 1947.12 Club meetings were held at Dyonnet’s Fraser Institute studio from November 189413 to November 1910 and subsequently in his Bleury Street studio from 1916 to 1937 and again from 1940 to 1947.14

Dyonnet was a club man and his career revolved around artists and arts organizations. Not only did he occupy various positions in the Pen and Pencil Club, but also he was Secretary of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts from 1910 to 1947, author of a history of the Academy with Hugh Jones in 1934, and a charter member of Montreal’s Arts Club in 1912. He saw himself as part of a larger community of artists that included Canadian artists of the past. In December 1912 he wrote to E.R. Greig, Curator of the Art Museum of Toronto, “I have collected records of over 100 Canadian artists from the very beginning of art in Canada to the present time.”15 Dyonnet’s best-known painted portraits are of fellow artists, including Henri Julien, Charles Gill, Henri Fabien, and sculptor Thomas Carli.16 In addition, he taught drawing at Montreal’s Council of Arts and Manufactures (1892–1922), the Art Association of Montreal (1901–8), the École Polytechnique de Montréal (1907–22), and Montreal’s École des Beaux-Arts (1922–4) and in the School of Architecture at McGill University (1920–36).

At the Pen and Pencil Club meeting of 21 March 1896, Maxime Ingres17 “mentioned the project of a club album of photographs and autographs of members, the former having been offered by Mr. Dyonnet some specimens of whose work were on view.”18 From this one might assume that Dyonnet had already begun to photograph club members, and the acceptance of his proposal formalized the project.

Dyonnet’s photographs were distributed among fellow members, and in 1950 B.K. Sandwell wrote to Dyonnet, “I still treasure your photographs of the early members of the Club and the memory of many happy evenings spent in your studio.”19 A set of twenty-eight vintage portraits of club members, mounted on cards and all signed by the sitter, is with the papers of charter member Robert Harris in the Confederation Centre Art Gallery in Charlottetown.20 Four collections of vintage prints of varying content, some signed and some not signed, with minor variations in cropping and framing, but all of club members, are in the McCord Museum, which also holds the archives of the Pen and Pencil Club. However, the portraits did not come with the Club papers, even though the initial resolution of 21 March 1896 stated that the photographs should be put into the ordinary club album instead of into a separate book. Two of the McCord collections are from unknown sources and two came from descendants of club members, Paul Lafleur and Charles Porteous.21

A sixth collection of Dyonnet’s photographs is in the Archives de la Ville de Montréal. These had been donated by Dyonnet to the Bibliothèque de la Ville de Montréal prior to 195122 and were transferred to the Archives in 1997. The collection consists of seventy-seven black and white prints mounted in an album, plus the glass plate negative for each portrait.23 This album was assembled in the early 1940s, as club member Warwick Chipman is identified as Ambassador to Chile, a posting he occupied from 1942 to 1945.24 It is probably the album of photographs of “old members and friends of the Pen and Pencil Club” that Dyonnet presented at the club meeting of 28 February 1942. The cover is inscribed in ink, “Pen and Pencil Club/Portraits des membres,” and typed on an inserted end paper, “PEN AND PENCIL CLUB/PORTRAITS DES MEMBRES/Compilée par Edmond Dyonnet, R.C.A.” Yet the title is again erroneous, as only forty-nine of the seventy-seven photographs depict club members, the additional twenty-eight being fellow artists and one non-artist, Dr. Henri Lafleur.25 Nor is it clear who physically assembled the album. Each subject is identified in ink by name, profession, and, where appropriate, status of membership in the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. However there are errors of spelling26 and identification of R.C.A. membership27 that would have been unacceptable to Dyonnet as long-term secretary of the Academy. Nor is the album a complete catalogue of Dyonnet’s photographs. The absence of glass negatives for a number of Dyonnet’s portraits found in other collections suggests that by the 1940s a number of negatives had been broken.

An additional collection of eighty-two portraits, mounted on card and identified in an unknown hand, was with a Montreal collector in 2007.28 Most of those prints are more tightly cropped, focusing on the subject’s head and chest. Seventy-eight prints of Dyonnet’s photographs are in the National Gallery album.

Defining a chronology of Dyonnet’s photographs poses a number of challenges. All the portraits in the Robert Harris fonds in Charlottetown bear dates inscribed in graphite in a modern hand. The cataloguer made the correct assumption that the photographs were linked to the Pen and Pencil Club, as the dates refer to the subject’s date of membership. However, as some bear dates predating Dyonnet’s return to Montreal in October 1890,29 they cannot be the dates the photographs were taken.

Club membership was the core of Dyonnet’s project, but it does not necessarily confirm the date of the photographs, as it is not clear if being photographed was an immediate benefit of membership. Some club members were not photographed by Dyonnet, the option presumably being up to the individual member.30 Some subjects, both members and non-members, were photographed twice at different sessions.31 Date of membership is clearly irrelevant for those subjects who were not club members.

With three exceptions, all the photographs appear to have been taken in Dyonnet’s studio. One exception might be the earliest portrait, that of Otto Jacobi, who moved from Montreal to Toronto in April 1891.32 Uniquely, Jacobi was photographed in his home,33 with Mrs. Jacobi glimpsed through the door (no. 5). In May 1896, prints were sent to Jacobi in Toronto for his signature.34

One can suggest groupings of portraits by the backgrounds against which the subjects were photographed. Twenty-one club members were photographed against a papered folding screen, as seen in Dyonnet’s self-portrait (fig. 3). An easily transportable piece of furniture, it might have been used in his two earlier studios before he moved to the Fraser Institute in 1894. The dates of membership of these sitters range from 1890 to 1896, forming a homogenous group, whose photographs can then be dated between 1891 and 1896.35 Four non-member artists, William Cruikshank, Charles Moss, Joseph Saint-Charles, and Horatio Walker, as well as Dr. Henri Lafleur,36 were also photographed in front of the screen.

Fig. 3. Edmond Dyonnet, Self Portrait, c. 1894, silver gelatin print mounted on card, 11.4 × 9.1 cm; card: 17.6 × 15 cm. Robert Harris fonds, Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Charlottetown, Gift of the Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAG H1821-k)

Fifty-six portraits, of which thirty-seven are of club members (including three self-portraits by Dyonnet), were taken against a cloth background. The cloth was hung in front of a carved Norman pearwood armoire that Dyonnet’s family had brought to Canada,37 as seen in the glass negative for the portrait of John Hammond (fig. 4). The armoire makes an impressive background for the portraits of club member R.J. Wickenden (no. 18) and three non-members, Joseph Franchère (no. 23), R.G. Mathews (no. 4), and Edmund Morris (no. 21). All subjects were photographed seated, save for Frank Houghton, J.W. Morrice,38 and Dyonnet’s self-portrait of 1910 (no. 54). F.W. Hutchison, who had a studio in the Fraser Institute by June 1902,39 was photographed against a background of a paisley-patterned textile (fig. 5).

Fig. 4. Edmond Dyonnet, John Hammond, c. 1904–1910, positive print from glass negative 16.4 × 12 cm. Fonds Edmond Dyonnet, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_1P027)

Fig. 5. Edmond Dyonnet, F.W. Hutchison, c. 1902, black and white matt print with white border, 12.3 × 9.6 cm with border (image 11.6 × 8.9 cm). Fonds Pen and Pencil Club, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P036)

The dates of membership of the club members photographed against the cloth hanging range from 1892 to 1913. However, once again, the membership dates do not always provide dates for the photographs. In 1891, Dyonnet painted a portrait of Henri Julien, former professor at the Council of Arts and Manufactures and club member from 26 January 189240 (fig. 6). Dyonnet’s photograph of Julien (fig. 7) was clearly taken many years later. Similarly, a photograph dated in the negative 20 May 190041 (fig. 8) of composer and organist Guillaume Couture, club member from 8 October 1892 to 13 January 1894, shows a considerably younger man than seen in Dyonnet’s portrait42 (fig. 9). Archibald Browne only became a member of the Pen and Pencil Club in 1923; however, comparison with a photo of Browne taken in 1919 confirms that Dyonnet’s photograph (no. 33) was taken earlier than 1923.43

Fig. 6. Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Julien, 1890, oil on hardboard, 35.2 × 26.5 cm. Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Gift of Anonymous Donor, 1987 (87/203). Photo: © Art Gallery of Ontario

Fig. 7. Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Julien, c. 1906, matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm). National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #31, p. 13 recto). Photo: NGC

Fig. 8. Unknown photographer, Guillaume Couture, 20 mai 1900. 1 photograph: b&w print, 25 × 20 cm. Archives, Université de Montréal, Fonds Guillaume Couture, P0014/F,0005

Fig. 9. Edmond Dyonnet, Guillaume Couture, c. 1910, toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm. National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #83, p. 26 verso). Photo: NGC

With the exception of Dr. Henri Lafleur, subjects who were not members of the Pen and Pencil Club were all artists and not writers. They were associated with Dyonnet through the Council of Arts and Manufactures, the Fraser Institute, or the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. Associates at the Council’s Montreal and Quebec schools included Charles Huot, Joseph Franchère, Charles Gill, Louis-Philippe Hébert (nos. 28, 23, 26, 32), and Joseph Saint-Charles.44 Dyonnet’s former pupils at the Council included Henri Fabien, A.Y. Jackson, Edward Boyd, and Dominique Rosaire (nos. 57, 14, 55, 9). Fellow tenants at Fraser Hall included the aforementioned F.W. Hutchison as well as Alphonse Jongers, half-brother of Maxime Ingres, C.J. Way (nos. 16, 20), and Henri Beau.45 James Smith was Dyonnet’s predecessor as secretary of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (no. 58), and other Toronto and Ottawa members of the Academy came to Montreal to attend exhibition openings and meetings of the Academy’s Council.

In addition to comparison with other surely dated photographs of his subjects, more specific dating of Dyonnet’s photographs can be proposed by the subjects’ various absences and presences in Montreal. Henri Fabien (no. 57) sported a beard in his identity card as exhibitor at the 1900 International Exposition in Paris, but removed it shortly after his return to Montreal in 1902.46 Charles Moss (fig. 10) was director of the Ottawa School of Art from 1883 to1888, when he left for Orange, NJ, but he returned to teach a six-week watercolour class at the Art Association of Montreal each autumn from 1892 to 1900.47 He attended a meeting of the Pen and Pencil Club on 17 October 1896. William St. Thomas Smith (no. 27) had a solo exhibition at the Art Association of Montreal in November 1904 when he was a guest at a club meeting on November 26.

Fig. 10. M.O. Hammond, copy of Edmond Dyonnet’s portrait of Charles Moss, c. 1896, positive scan from negative. M.O. Hammond fonds, Archives of Ontario, Toronto (F 1075-12-0-0-56)

Dyonnet’s painting companions were also photographed. William Cruikshank (no. 2) first painted on the Lower Saint Lawrence in 1895,48 and in the summer of 1897 Edmund Morris, Cruikshank, Dyonnet, and Maurice Cullen all painted at Beaupré, crossing over to visit Horatio Walker on the Île d’Orléans.49 (fig. 11) At Beaupré, Dyonnet photographed Cullen and himself painting with canvases on a collapsible easel of Dyonnet’s design50 (fig. 12 and no. 49). From 1898 to 1903, with the aid of Charles Porteous, he would try to patent and market it as the Corot easel (fig. 13).51

Fig. 11. Edmond Dyonnet, Horatio Walker, c. 1895–1897, black and white matt print with white border, 12.3 × 9.6 cm with border (image 11.6 × 8.9 cm). Fonds Pen and Pencil Club, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P070)

Fig. 12. Edmond Dyonnet, Self-portrait at Beaupré, 1897, glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.7 × 8.3 cm. National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #53, p. 19 recto). Photo: NGC

Fig. 13. Edmond Dyonnet, Corot Easel, c. 1898, glossy silver gelatin print mounted on card, 12 × 9.4 cm, card 18.5 × 11.8 cm. National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa. Photo: NGC

Dyonnet’s photographs circulated in various ways during his lifetime, though he was never identified as their author. Details of his portraits of Alphonse Jongers (no. 16), Robert Harris (no. 6), and William Brymner (fig. 19) and his self-portrait (fig. 3) were engraved for the article “Some Representative Canadian Sculptors and Painters” in the Montreal Daily Witness of 2 April 1898, and a detail of Joseph Franchère’s portrait accompanied M.J. Mount’s article on Franchère in The Canadian Century in July 1910.52 Dyonnet illustrated his own article, “L’art chez les canadiens-français,” in The Year Book of Canadian Art 1913 with details of his photographs of Clarence Gagnon, Louis-Philippe Hébert, Henri Julien, and Charles Huot.53 Albert Laberge reproduced Dyonnet’s photographs of Henri Beau, Maurice Cullen, and Arthur Rosaire in Peintres et Écrivains d’Hier et d’Aujourd’hui54 and Dyonnet’s portrait of Joseph Franchère in Journalistes, Écrivains et Artistes.55

On two occasions, Dyonnet’s portraits were used by others, with the artist’s consent, as the basis for their own works of art. In 1905, the Pen and Pencil Club raised a subscription for a bust of the late William McLennan for the Fraser Institute and McGill Library, two institutions with which McLennan was closely connected.56 The sculptor, Louis-Philippe Hébert, based his portrait on Dyonnet’s photo (figs. 14 and 15). In 1922, G. Horne Russell, then President of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, of which Dyonnet was Secretary, painted a portrait of Dyonnet from the latter’s photograph of himself (figs. 16 and 17).

Fig. 14. Edmond Dyonnet, William McLennan, c. 1891–1896, toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 11.5 × 9.1 cm. National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #66, p. 22 recto). Photo: NGC

Fig. 15. Louis-Philippe Hébert, William McLennan, 1905, bronze, 56.8 × 52.1 × 31.3 cm. Visual Arts Collections, McGill University, Montreal (1975-018). Photo: NGC

Fig. 16. Edmond Dyonnet, Self-portrait, 1912, matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm). National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #11, p. 3 recto). Photo: NGC

Fig. 17. G. Horne Russell, Edmond Dyonnet, 1922, oil on canvas, 79.3 × 64 cm. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Gift of Gabrielle Lorin, Saint-Laurent, Québec, 1974 (17947). 
Photo: NGC

Dyonnet was not the only person producing a corpus of portraits of Canadians prominent in the arts. The Toronto Globe journalist, editor, and art critic M.O. Hammond (1876–1934) was an active member of a number of art and literary circles and regularly photographed members of the Arts and Letters Club, the Canadian Art Club, and other organizations over a period of twenty-five years, exhibiting his photographs with various camera clubs. In the fall of 1927, he packaged a series of these portraits of Canadian artists and sold them to the Art Gallery of Toronto, the Toronto Public Library, the National Gallery of Canada, and the government of Quebec.57 Subsequently he offered portraits of deceased artists that were, by necessity, copied from photographs, engravings, drawings, or oils made by others. Dyonnet was in Toronto on Academy business twice in 1926 when Hammond photographed him with Maurice Cullen and G. Horne Russell (no. 45), and Hammond must have acquired prints from Dyonnet for his second series, which he offered in December 1927.58 This series included nineteen portraits that are details of photographs taken by Dyonnet. He subsequently also offered copies of Dyonnet’s portraits of Charles Gill and John Pinhey59 and reproduced a detail of Dyonnet’s portrait of Louis-Philippe Hébert in his book Painting and Sculpture in Canada.60 Dyonnet’s photographs of Charles Moss and Joseph Saint-Charles are only known through Hammond’s copies61 (fig. 10).

In addition to teaching, Dyonnet made his living as a portrait painter, and, while he both painted and photographed fellow artists Henri Julien, Charles Gill, Henri Fabien, and John Hammond and club members Maxime Ingres, William Herrick, Charles Porteous, Paul Lafleur, and J.T.W. Burgess,62 he did not use his photographs as studies for paintings. His photo documentation was a separate project. However, it appears that Dyonnet’s photography did become a matter of concern to him. Thomas Garside told Dyonnet’s biographer Jean Ménard that it became rumoured that Dyonnet used photographs to paint his portraits and, fearing to risk his reputation, he destroyed his camera.63 This was not entirely correct, for in 1920, Dyonnet told club member Percy Nobbs that “the photographic gallery of Club members was no longer being kept up. Dyonnet stated that he had been represented as a professional photographer, to which apparently he strongly objected. He would however be glad to lend his camera for the purpose of keeping up the collection.”64

Dyonnet stopped taking photographs in 1913. The catalyst appears to have been his forced move from the Fraser Institute in early 1914 due to major renovations.65 W.H. Clapp became a member of the Pen and Pencil Club in April 1913 and appears to have been the last member photographed in Dyonnet’s old studio66 (no. 8). There are no photos of subsequent new members; however, it is possible that J.W. Beatty was photographed that November, when he attended meetings of the Academy Council in Montreal.67

One photograph was taken in 1915. A.Y. Jackson returned to Montreal from Toronto in December 1914, awaiting developments in the war that had broken out in September. In June 1915, following the battle of Saint Julien, he enlisted and left for England in the autumn.68 Jackson was a former pupil of Dyonnet’s and was launched on a promising career, and Dyonnet’s wish to photograph him in uniform was undoubtedly spurred by respect for his having enlisted and knowing he faced an uncertain future (no. 14). Among Jackson’s papers is the only known large paper print of a Dyonnet photo.69

The core of the National Gallery album consists of Dyonnet’s portraits, but other photographs are also associated with Dyonnet. In 1910, he was photographed with E. Rimbault Dibdin, curator of the Walker Gallery in Liverpool (no. 52), when Dyonnet accompanied the exhibition of Canadian art organized by the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts for the Festival of Empire in London. When it was cancelled due to the death of King Edward VII, he negotiated its presentation in Liverpool.70 An informal portrait of William Brymner, possibly taken in Dyonnet’s studio (fig. 18), might also be by Dyonnet, as Brymner is wearing the same suit, shirt, and tie as in the Pen and Pencil Club portrait (fig. 19). In another Dyonnet photograph of Brymner (private collection), Brymner handles the Roman Tanagra figure visible on the shelf behind him in this studio portrait. Ovid Gould, whose snapshot shows him sketching out of doors (no. 56), attended the Academy’s life class with Dyonnet in 1898,71 and Dyonnet exhibited a portrait of Ovid Gould in 1901.72

Fig. 18. Attributed to Edmond Dyonnet, William Brymner in a studio, c. 1891–1896, matt silver gelatin print with no border, 12.0 × 9.8 cm. National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #50, p.18 recto). Photo: NGC

Fig. 19. Edmond Dyonnet, William Brymner, c. 1891–1896, silver salts, albumen process, 11.3 × 8 cm. McCord Museum, Montreal, Gift of Mrs. Paul F. Sise (MP-0000-2569.2). Photo: © McCord Museum

Dyonnet’s photographs in the National Gallery album are toned matt prints with thin borders in two sizes, approximately 15.2 × 10.9 cm or approximately 10.4 × 7.8 cm. The matt prints were probably commercially printed, but a number of toned glossy prints of varying dimensions without borders may have been printed by Dyonnet himself. The portraits of artists are mostly matt and are arranged in the front of the album, while the portraits of non-artist members of the Pen and Pencil Club are mostly glossy and arranged in the middle of the album. While nothing is known about where Dyonnet learned photography or what cameras he used, the quality of his portraits is consistently high and gives evidence of the portrait painter’s ability to capture the telling body language of his sitters: the self-assuredness of William Brymner (fig. 19), the eccentric vanity of Horatio Walker (fig. 11), the dramatic flamboyance of Dr. Burgess, psychiatrist at the Verdun psychiatric hospital (no. 67), and the timidity (or ill health) of Arthur Rosaire (no. 9).

The person who assembled the album added a number of other photographs of artists, but no additional portraits of authors. Fifteen are commercially printed black and white photos, and one is an early toned print of R.F. Gagen, by M.O. Hammond (no. 7). These are smaller than the prints Hammond marketed in the late 1920s and include his copies of John Bell-Smith’s painted self-portrait of 1853 (no. 102), William Notman’s photo of the hanging committee of the first exhibition of the Canadian Academy in 1880 (no. 103), and an early photo of Tom Thomson (no. 98). Hammond’s own portraits73 include the group photograph of Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen, and G. Horne Russell taken in 1926 (no. 45).

Exceptionally, the album also contains a black and white glossy photograph, signed by Suzor-Coté, taken by a street photographer in Miami in the 1930s, a photograph of a published article illustrated with a photograph of Suzor-Coté74 (nos. 87, 89), and a photograph of a 1937 portrait by Kenneth Forbes (no. 108).

Of greater interest are a few nineteenth-century prints, including a portrait of the Saint John, NB artist J.C. Miles (no. 3), a posed portrait of William Brymner seated at his easel (no. 51), William Notman’s 1871 photo of William Fraser (no. 48), and the aforementioned group portrait of Harris, Jacobi, and Brymner (no. 106), as well as two lone photographs of women artists: a snapshot of Claire Fauteux playing golf (no. 46) and a studio portrait of the Montreal painter Margaret Houghton holding a palette (no. 47). “Sweet looking at our still life” (no. 109) is inscribed in graphite on the album sheet below a photograph showing the Art Association of Montreal caretaker with a still life by Ulric Lamarche exhibited in the 1897 Spring Exhibition.75

In addition to the album discussed here, the Library and Archives of the National Gallery also owns a number of Dyonnet’s photographs mounted on card, one being glued to the back of a printed invitation to the 1918 RCA exhibition.76 Though their source is unknown, these probably came with the album. The photos include Dyonnet’s photographs of five of his paintings,77 mounted copies of his photographs of Robert Harris, Maurice Cullen, and Homer Watson, identified on the card in an unknown hand, a duplicate of the snapshot of Ovid Gould, and unmounted prints of his photographs of J.W. Beatty, Percy Nobbs, Archibald Browne, and Curtis Williamson, as well as two mounted photographs of the Corot easel, folded and open (see fig. 13).

The predominance of Montreal subjects in the album and the misidentification of a portrait of Fred Haines, a prominent Toronto artist78 (no. 107), suggests that the interest of the album’s compiler related to Montreal. One person who may have been associated with it, possibly adding items to an existing album of Dyonnet’s prints, was Thomas Roche Lee (1915–1977). Lee was editor of the Ingersoll Tribune in 1949 and later mayor of Baie d’Urfé on the west island of Montreal from 1957 to 1961.79 He wrote on Albert Robinson and Daniel Fowler80 and defined himself as “a collector of literature relative to Canadian painting and painters.”81 His collecting interests were wide, and the Art Gallery of Ontario, the National Gallery of Canada, and the McCord Museum all have items he owned. Lee was close to Dyonnet during the artist’s later years, and in 1953 he had the English typescript of Dyonnet’s memoirs retyped and mimeographed in one hundred copies.82 The Thomas Roche Lee collection in the Edward P. Taylor Research Library at the Art Gallery of Ontario83 includes Warwick Chipman’s ode to Dyonnet, “On the Fortieth Anniversary of his Election to the Pen and Pencil Club,” and thirty letters to Dyonnet, suggesting that Lee had access to Dyonnet’s estate. Lee shared Dyonnet’s antipathy to modernism in art, and the Ottawa album includes portraits of other vocal conservatives, such as Kenneth Forbes84 and John Radford of Vancouver (nos. 10 and 104). The predominance of items by and related to Dyonnet in the Ottawa album link it to Dyonnet and through Dyonnet to Lee.85

My thanks to Kathleen Mackinnon, Registrar at the Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Heather McNabb, Reference Archivist at the McCord Museum, Agnieszka Prycik at the Archives de la Ville de Montréal, and Philip Dombowsky in the Library and Archives of the National Gallery of Canada for their assistance in the preparation of this article.

Notes

1 All subjects are identified below the photographs on the album page. Photographs of J.W. Morrice, F.W. Hutchison, Clarence Gagnon, William Brymner, and A.Y. Jackson were removed, presumably before the National Gallery acquired the album.

2 “Un artiste canadien,” La Minerve, October 28, 1890, 11. Louis Frechette, “À propos de peinture,” Le Canada Artistique, vol. I, no. 1 (November 1890), 181 and note on 180. See also Edmond Dyonnet, Memoirs of a Canadian Artist [mimeographed] (Montreal, 1951) and Edmond Dyonnet, Mémoires d’un artiste canadien (Ottawa: Éditions de l’Université d’Ottawa, 1968).

3 Dyonnet, Memoirs, 30 and Dyonnet, Mémoires, 43. Dyonnet’s address in the catalogue of the 1892 Art Association of Montreal Spring Exhibition (opening April 18, 1892) is given as 1000 Dorchester Street. On Maxime Ingres see Robert H. Michel, “‘Easy, Debonair and Brisk’: Maxime Ingres at McGill,” Fontanus, vol. XIII (2013): 131–34.

4 In Lovell’s Montreal Directory (http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna.lovell) for 1894–95 (corrected to June 25, 1894), the Ingres-Coutellier School of Languages is listed at 9 University Street. Dyonnet is listed at 9 University Street in Lovell’s Directory for 1895–96. See also note 13.

5 See Edgar C. Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library: An Informal History (London: Clive Bingley, 1977), 36–64. In the alphabetical directory in Lovell’s Montreal Directory for 1895, the Fraser Institute is listed at 811 Dorchester Street, the library entrance being on Dorchester and the rented spaces at 9 University Street.

6 Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library, 76, 83.

7 Robert Harris, Montreal, to his mother, Charlottetown, September 30, 1888. Robert Harris fonds, Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Gift of the Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAGH-4372). In Lovell’s Montreal Directory for 1890–91 (corrected to June 23, 1890), Harris and Jacobi are listed at the Fraser Institute, 9 University Street.

8 Robert Harris, Montreal to his mother, Charlottetown, 19 October 19, 1890, Robert Harris fonds, Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Gift of the Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAGH-4538).

9 All references to meetings of the Pen and Pencil Club are in the club’s Minute Books in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, in the McCord Museum, Montreal (P139). The minute books of the meetings, membership records, scrapbooks, and correspondence are available online at collections.musee-mccord.qc.ca. Boodle was librarian of the Fraser Institute until late 1890. Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library, 78.

10 For a history of the Pen and Pencil Club see Leonard Cox, “Fifty Years of Brush and Pen: A Historical Sketch of the Pen and Pencil Club of Montreal,” Queen’s Quarterly 46, no. 3 (Autumn 1939): 341–47, and Leo Cox and J. Harry Smith, The Pen & Pencil Club 1890–1959 (Montreal: The Pen and Pencil Club, [1959]). This latter publication gives dates of membership but not resignations. There were a number of resignations in the first two years. William Raphael was a member from March 17, 1890 to December 19, 1891, Otto Jacobi from March 17, 1890 to April 18, 1891, J.C. Pinhey from March 17, 1890 to December 19, 1891, A.T. Taylor from March 17 to December 13, 1890, Munsey Seymour from January 10 to December 19, 1891, Dr. W.H. Drummond from January 30 to March 22, 1892, and Joseph Gould from March 12 to October 22, 1892.

11 Pen and Pencil Club members Maxime Ingres and Leigh Gregor were on the Executive Committee of the Fraser Institute from 1898 to 1900 and 1908 to 1912, respectively. Eugène Lafleur, Paul Lafleur’s brother, was active from 1894 to 1930. Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library, 211–12. On the overlapping memberships of these various organizations see Hélène Sicotte, “William Brymner: A Remarkably Social Man,” in William Brymner: Artist, Teacher, Colleague (Kingston: Agnes Etherington Art Centre, 2010), 23–33.

12 See minutes of Pen and Pencil Club meetings of October 24, 1913, November 1, 1913, October 21, 1916, October 30, 1937, October 26, 1940, and November 6, 1948, when Percy May is noted as Treasurer for the second year.

13 Pen and Pencil Club Minutes of the meeting of November 10, 1894. This is the first reference to Dyonnet’s studio in the Fraser Institute.

14 Leo Cox, “Fifty Years of Brush and Pen,” in The Pen & Pencil Club 1890–1959 (Montreal, January 1959), n.p. The club met at Dyonnet’s studio at the Fraser institute from October 27, 1894 until November 1910, when the club began to meet in the studio of Alberta Cleland, also in the Fraser Institute. They met in Kenneth Macpherson’s studio at 255 Bleury St. from May 4, 1911 to April 29, 1916 (Macpherson died April 26, 1916). That autumn Dyonnet took over Macpherson’s studio, moving to 255 Bleury St., and meetings continued there until fall 1937. See also minutes of club meetings of October 26, 1940 and May 3, 1947.

15 Edmond Dyonnet, Montreal to E.R. Greig, Toronto, December 30, 1912, E.P. Taylor Research Library & Archives, Art Gallery of Ontario (A3.9.6 Art Museum of Toronto Letters 1912–1920, Box 4 – Royal Canadian Academy of Arts). Fellow artist Edmund Morris shared Dyonnet’s interest in the early history of Canadian art and in January 1911 organized the exhibition Paintings by Deceased Canadian Artists at the Art Museum of Toronto. Dyonnet corrected Morris’s errors in the dates of Paul Peel and Allan Edson. Dyonnet, Montreal to Morris, Toronto, January 30, 1911 (Edgar J. Stone Collection, E.P. Taylor Research Library & Archives, Art Gallery of Ontario).

16 The Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec owns Dyonnet’s portraits of Henri Julien (49.65) and Charles Gill (1938.15), the Art Gallery of Ontario a portrait of Julien (87/203) and Henri Fabien (69/30), the National Gallery of Canada a portrait of Fabien (28119), and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts the portrait of Thomas Carli (1943.778).

17 Maxime Ingres had been nominated for membership in the Pen and Pencil Club by Dyonnet and William Brymner on January 16, 1892.

18 Pen and Pencil Club Minutes, Meeting of March 21, 1896.

19 B.K. Sandwell, Toronto to Edmond Dyonnet, Montreal, June 17, 1950, in Edmond Dyonnet fonds (P9/1/3), Centre de Recherche en Civilisation Canadienne-française, Université d’Ottawa.

20 Accession numbers CAG H-1821 a–zz and CAG H-225. Gift of the Robert Harris Trust, 1965. The dates of membership of the sitters range from 1890 to 1900.

21 The provenance of McCord albums MP-1978.129.1–26 consisting of 26 portraits and MP-1980.197.1-40 (40 portraits) is unknown. MP-1992.1–23 (23 portraits) came from the Estate of Mrs. A. (Adolphe) Lomer, sister of club member Paul T. Lafleur and mother of Gerhard Lomer, McGill’s head librarian 1920–48. MP-0000-2569.1–21 (21 portraits) was a gift of Mrs. Paul F. Sise, daughter of club member Charles Porteous.

22 Leo-Paul Desrosiers, Conservateur, Bibliothèque, Ville de Montréal to E. Dyonnet, Montreal, September 20, 1951. Desrosiers acknowledges receipt of a typed copy of Dyonnet’s memoirs and writes, “Nous avons d’ailleurs, à la Bibliothèque, une belle collection que vous nous avez donné” (Edmond Dyonnet fonds, P9/1/3–23). There is a photocopy of the Archives album, plus some original photos mounted on card in the Edmond Dyonnet fonds at the Université d’Ottawa.

23 The glass negatives come in two sizes, approximately 12.5 × 10 cm and 16.5 × 12 cm, though dimensions are not consistent. The dimensions of the plate do not appear to relate to the dating of the portraits.

24 See Global Affairs Canada website, available at http://w05.international.gc.ca/HeadsOfPost. See also the minutes of club meetings of February 28, 1942 and November 28, 1942.

25 Dr. Henri Lafleur was a brother of prominent club member Paul T. Lafleur. Both taught at McGill University. On the Lafleur family members, see Madeleine Landry, Beaupré 1896–1904: Lieu d’inspiration d’une peinture identitaire (Québec: Septentrion, 2014), 40–43.

26 Gustave Hahn (for Gustav), Alphonse Jougers (for Jongers), MacPhail (for Macphail), MacPherson (for Macpherson), G.R. Matthews (for R.G. Mathews), A. Dickson Paterson (for Patterson), E. Horne Russell (for G. Horne Russell), W. Lt. Thomas Smith (for St. Thomas Smith), Dr. R. Tait-McKenzie [for R. Tait McKenzie], and J.C. Way (for C.J. Way).

27 Members were first elected Associates of the Academy (A.R.C.A.) and could subsequently be elected full members (R.C.A.) when a vacancy arose in the maximum membership of forty members. Edmund Morris is identified as R.C.A., when he was only A.R.C.A., elected in 1898. Similarly A.D. Rosaire, R.C.A. was an A.R.C.A., elected in 1914. W. St. Thomas Smith, was elected A.R.C.A. in 1902. A transcription carried over from a previous photograph of Dean Walton, Dean of Law at McGill, identifies one of two portraits of Homer Watson as “Homer Watson, R.C.A. professeur au McGill Univ.”

28 I have not seen these prints and know of them only from scanned printouts. Each is mounted on card and sitters are identified in an unknown, printed hand.

29 William Brymner, Robert Harris, William Hope, John Logan, John Try Davies, Paul Lafleur William McLennan, John Pinhey, Norman Rielle, Forbes Torrance, and Otto Jacobi.

30 The following members elected between 1890 and 1914, some being members only briefly, were not photographed: R.W. Boodle, E.B. Brownlow, E. Colonna, S.E. Dawson, Louis Fréchette, Dean Moyse, William Raphael , A.T. Taylor, Percy Woodcock, William Van Horne, Ivan Wotherspoon, Munsey Seymour, Archdeacon F.G. Scott, Dr. W.H. Drummond, Joseph Gould, Prof. John Cox, F.C.V. Ede, J. McD. Oxley, A.J. Glazebrook , J.B. Hance, E.W. Thompson, B.K. Sandwell, Charles J. Saxe, James McLennan, Albert H. Robinson, J.E. Hoare, J.B. Fitzmaurice, Prof. F.E. Lloyd, A. Campbell Geddes, Prof. René De Roure, and Hon. Justice E.F. Surveyer.

31 These include members William Brymner, Warwick Chipman, Maurice Cullen, Alphonse Jongers, Paul Lafleur , K.R. Macpherson, Percy Nobbs, and Charles Porteous and non-members Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté, Homer Watson, and Curtis Williamson. There are five self-portraits by Dyonnet. See figs. 3 and 12 and nos. 11, 54, 69.

32 Otto Jacobi, Toronto to J. Try Davies, Montreal, April 15, 1891 (Pen and Pencil Club scrapbook I, p. 229).

33 In Lovell’s Montreal Directory for 1890–91 (corrected to June 23, 1890), Jacobi is listed as “artist, Fraser Institute, 9 University, h. 2441 St. Catherine.”

34 O.R. Jacobi, Summerhill Ave., Toronto North to Paul T. Lafleur, Montreal, May 15, 1896 (Pen & Pencil Club Papers, Correspondence, Box 1). On the verso of the card bearing his photograph in the Confederation Art Gallery (CAG H-1821zz), Jacobi wrote, “Otto Reinhold Jacobi, geb. on the 27th of February 1812, now/84 years old. I was born in Königsberg in East Prussia, and/took very early to painting. And frequented our royal Art school there,/15 years old I was engaged teacher in the Deaf and Dumb Institute/with a good salary for a full year, and succeeded so well, that they/promised to raise my salary, if I would stay; but I had greater/things in my mind, and whent with the help of my late fathers/friends, who was a free mason of some merits, to Berlin to the Acade-/my where I was well received by good introductions of my fathers/friends. I studied there for two years, and on the third year I entered/a competition for 3 years competition to send to the Düsseldorf/Academy; we were about 12 competitors; each had to paint in the/Gallery one oil painting – best Landscape – one a life size Portrait/and one oil of his own invention, and several other things./I succeeded in winning the capital Prize of thousand Dollars in 1832/whent then to Düsseldorf, staid there with our best Artists for 9 years./Was then recommended to the Duke of Nassau, who was please to give/me the degree as Professor and Court painter, where I remained in Wiesbaden/till I went in 1860 on invitation, to paint the reception of the Prince/of Wales a picture: the Showenagan falls of tree Rivers.”

35 The following subjects (with dates of membership) were photographed against the folding screen: Edward Arthy (December 17, 1892—no. 80), William Brymner (March 5, 1890—fig. 19), Dr. T.W. Burgess (November 25, 1894—no. 67), Maurice Cullen (November 14, 1896—no. 36), Edmond Dyonnet (February 7, 1891—fig. 3), Robert Harris (March 5, 1890—no. 6) William Hope (March 5, 1890—no. 37), Max Ingres (January 30, 1892—no. 90), Alphonse Jongers (October 31, 1896—no. 16), Paul Lafleur (March 17, 1890—no. 61), John E. Logan (March 5, 1890—no. 60), William McLennan (March 17, 1890—no. 66), K.R. Macpherson (January 16, 1892—no. 74), George Murray (January 11, 1896—no. 63), John O’Flaherty (January 11, 1896—no. 81), John C. Pinhey (March 17, 1890—no. 13), C.E.L. Porteous (November 19, 1892—no. 85), Norman T. Rielle (March 17, 1890—no. 65), Forbes Torrance (March 17, 1890—no. 71), W. Townsend (March 3, 1895—no. 91), John Try-Davies (March 5, 1890—no. 59).

36 Cruikshank (no. 2), Moss (fig. 10), Walker (fig. 11). The photograph of Dr. Henri Lafleur is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P043). A copy of Dyonnet’s photograph of Joseph Saint-Charles is in the M.O. Hammond fonds, Archives of Ontario, F1075-12-0-0-60.

37 On the armoires see Jean Chauvin, “Edmond Dyonnet,” in Ateliers (Montreal and New York: Louis Carrier, 1928), 193; J. Harry Smith, “Dyonnet & Canadian Art,” Saturday Night, September 18, 1948, 20. Dyonnet might have inherited the armoires following the death of his father in 1900. See Dyonnet to Charles Porteous, March 6, 1900 (Porteous Papers LAC), and Minutes of the Pen and Pencil Club meeting of March 10, 1900.

38 Prints of Dyonnet’s photograph of Frank Houghton are in the Confederation Centre Art Gallery (H-1821v), the Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P034), and the McCord Museum (MP-1978.129.10, MP-1980.197.34, MP-1992.11.6 and MP-0000-2569.8). A print and negative of Dyonnet’s portrait of Morrice is in the Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P052).

39 Lovell’s Montreal Directory 1902–03 corrected to June 20, 1902.

40 Julien was nominated for membership by Dyonnet, December 19, 1891.

41 See “Sur les traces de Guillaume Couture,” www.archiv.umontreal.ca/pdf/CoutureG.pdf.

42 In Lovell’s Montreal Directories from 1903–04 to 1909–10, Couture is listed at 58 University Street with Paul Lafleur and Dr. Henri Lafleur. In the 1910–11, directory he is listed at Fraser Institute Hall.

43 Compare the photographs reproduced in E.F.B. Johnston, “Art and the Work of Archibald Browne,” The Canadian Magazine, vol. XXXI, no. 6 (October 1908): 529 and that in Saturday Night, vol. XXXIII, no. 8 (December 6, 1919): 3.

44 Dyonnet, Mémoires, 47 names Joseph Franchère, Joseph St. Charles, and Charles Gill as his assistants. In the Council’s annual reports, published in the annual reports of the Ministry of Agriculture of the Province of Quebec, Charles Huot is listed as teaching in the Quebec City school of the Council of Arts and Manufactures from 1894, Saint-Charles in the Montreal school from 1898, Joseph Franchère from 1899, and Louis-Philippe Hébert from 1895 to 1898. See Daniel Drouin, “Chronologie,” in Louis-Philippe Hébert, ed. Daniel Drouin (Quebec: Musée du Québec, 2001), 332–33.

45 Lovell’s Montreal Directory: 1897–1898 (corrected to June 25, 1897) lists Alphonse Jongers at 9 University Street; 1899–1900 (corrected to June 27, 1899) lists C.J. Way. In the catalogue of the March 8–23, 1901 Art Association of Montreal Spring Exhibition, Henri Beau’s address is given as 9 University Street. Beau was elected a member of the Pen and Pencil Club on November 7, 1903. Dyonnet’s photograph of Henri Beau is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P003).

46 Fabien’s identity card for the 1900 Paris Exposition is in the Henri Fabien fonds, Centre de Recherche en Civilisation canadienne-française, Université d’Ottawa (Ph28-B8). “Correspondance Parisienne,” La Patrie, dated Paris April 1, 1902 (P28 1/2), notes his upcoming return to Canada in June. In photographs in the same fonds, identified as taken in his Montreal studio, Fabien is beardless (Ph28-B14 and Ph28-B15). He moved to Ottawa in 1905.

47 See the Annual Reports of the Art Association of Montreal for the years 1892 to 1900.

48 “Art Notes,” Saturday Night, September 28, 1895, 9.

49 Undated entry in Edmund Morris Diary, Edmund Montague Morris fonds, Queen’s University Archives. William Cruikshank, Toronto to Edmund Morris, Hillhurst, October 10, 1898 (Edward J. Stone Collection 4–6, E.P. Taylor Research Library and Archives, Art Gallery of Ontario).

50 The canvas Dyonnet is painting is illustrated in the view of his studio in “Some Representative Canadian Sculptors and Painters,” Montreal Daily Witness, April 2, 1898 and captioned as “ on exhibition at the Art Gallery.” The painting is A Yoke of Oxen, exhibited at the Art Association of Montreal Spring Exhibition from April 4, 1898.

51 Regarding their efforts to patent and sell the Corot easel, see Charles Porteous fonds, Library & Archives Canada (R7381-0-0-E): Henry A. Budden to E. Dyonnet, Montreal, February 26, 1898 and Charles Porteous to Dyonnet, Beaupré, June 12, 1898 (letter book 20 chronological); Dyonnet, Montreal to Porteous, June 20, 1898; Porteous to J.D. Smith, Artists Supplies, London, November 23, 1899 (letter book 21 chronological); Dyonnet to Porteous, March 6, 1900, Porteous to Donald Robb, London, England, March 17, 1900 and Porteous to D. Robb, London, April 17, 1900 (letter book 22, chronological); D. Robb, London to Porteous, June 13, 1900 (vol. 8 chronological); Porteous to D. Robb, June 29, 1900 (letter book 22 chronological); and Dyonnet to Porteous, October 6, 1903 (vol. 11 chronological).

52 M.J. Mount, “Joseph Franchère and his Work,” The Canadian Century II, no. 4 (July 30, 1910): 12.

53 The Year Book of Canadian Art 1913 (Toronto: J.M. Dent & Sons, Limited, 1913), opposite p. 220.

54 Albert Laberge, Peintres et Écrivains d’Hier et d’Aujourd’hui (Montreal: Édition privée, 1938), opposite pp. 29, 36, 44.

55 Albert Laberge, Journalistes, Écrivains et Artistes (Montreal: Édition privée, 1945), opposite p. 184.

56 See minutes of Pen and Pencil Club meetings of October 20, 1904, October 14, and December 23, 1905, and January 6 and February 17, 1906. The unveiling of the bust is recorded in the minutes of the meeting of February 9, 1907. The bust is dated 1905.

57 M.O. Hammond, Toronto to Newton MacTavish, October 26, 1927 in the Library and Archives of the National Gallery of Canada, file 7.4-Hammond, and Hammond’s diary entries for October, 19, 25, and 26 and November 8 and 21, 1927 and January 7, 13, 18, and 25 and February 1, 1928 in M.O. Hammond fonds, Archives of Ontario (F-1075-5). Hammond kept a daily diary from 1890 to his death in 1934.

58 M.O. Hammond diary entries for August 20 and November 16 and 18, 1926. I have located no mention in Hammond’s diaries of his borrowing or purchasing prints from Dyonnet. M.O. Hammond, Toronto to Eric Brown, Ottawa, December 9, 1927 in Library and Archives, National Gallery of Canada, file 7.4-Hammond.

59 Library and Archives, National Gallery of Canada, file 7.4-Hammond. Hammond’s portraits of F.M. Bell-Smith, F. Brownell, William Brymner, W.H. Clapp, Wm. Cruikshank, J.C. Franchère, John Hammond, Robert Harris, Louis-Philippe Hébert, William Hope, F.W. Hutchison, O.R. Jacobi, Henri Julien, R. Tait McKenzie, J.W. Morrice, Edmund Morris, Charles Moss, A.D. Rosaire, Joseph Saint-Charles, and C.J. Way are all copies after Dyonnet and were included in Hammond’s series II in December 1927. Hammond’s portrait of Charles Gill, offered in series IX on July 3, 1932, and of John Pinhey in Series VII, offered May 24, 1930, are also copies after Dyonnet. On occasion Hammond issued second, updated portraits of a number of artists, but his earlier copies after Dyonnet’s portraits can be found in the E.P. Taylor Research Library and Archives, Art Gallery of Ontario and the Library and Archives of the National Gallery of Canada.

60 M.O. Hammond, Painting and Sculpture in Canada (Toronto: Ryerson Press, 1930), 59.

61 Hammond’s copy after Dyonnet’s portrait of Joseph Saint-Charles is in the M.O. Hammond fonds, Archives of Ontario (F 1075-12-0-0-60).

62 Dyonnet exhibited a portrait of Maxime Ingres at the Spring Exhibition of the Art Association of Montreal in 1894, of Henri Julien in a benefit exhibition for the Hôpital Notre Dame in October 1895, of William Herrick in the Spring Exhibition in 1900, of Charles Gill in the Spring Exhibition of 1901, of Charles Porteous with the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (RCA) in March 1902 (illustrated in the 1903 catalogue of the Dominion Exhibition in Toronto), of Paul Lafleur with the RCA in 1904, of John Hammond in the Spring Exhibition in 1913, and of Dr. Burgess with the RCA in 1913.

63 Jean Ménard, “Préface,” in Mémoires, 12.

64 Minutes of the Pen and Pencil Club meeting of December 18, 1920.

65 Edmond Dyonnet, Memoirs, 30. University Street was extended south in 1912 from Dorchester to Belmont Street and Fraser Institute Hall was renumbered from 9 to 283 University Street. (see Lovell’s Montreal Directory 1912–13 and 1913–14) The meeting of the RCA Council was held at Dyonnet’s studio at 283 University Street on May 25, 1912 (Royal Canadian Academy of Arts fonds, Library and Archives Canada, MG28 I 126, vol. 1, Minute Book 2, 284). Dyonnet is still listed at 283 University in the catalogue of the 1913 RCA exhibition commencing November 20, 1913, but he is listed at 2011 Waverly in the 1914–15 edition of Lovell (commencing July 1, 1914).

66 From 1909 to 1914, Clapp rented a studio at 255 Bleury Street owned by sculptor G.W. Hill. Clapp’s address in the catalogue of the February 1909 exhibition of the Ontario Society of Artists and the catalogues of the 1909, 1910, 1912, and 1913 AAM Spring exhibitions and Lovell’s Montreal Directory for 1914–15 (commencing 1 July 1914) is 255 Bleury Street. Dyonnet would take over K.R. Macpherson’s studio at 255 Bleury in 1916 following the latter’s death on 26 April 1916.

67 RCA Minute Books, meeting of November 21, 1913 (RCA fonds, vol. 2, 310).

68 A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country (Toronto: Clarke, Irwin & Company, 1958), 33. A.Y. Jackson, Valcartier, Quebec to James MacCallum, Toronto, postmarked 1 July 1915, James MacCallum fonds, Library & Archives, National Gallery of Canada. A.Y. Jackson, Bramshott, Hats. to Florence Clement, Berlin, Ontario, December 25, 1915, N.J. Groves, Fonds, Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa (MG30 D351, Box 76 File 21).

69 Among the Dyonnet photos with a private collector in 2007 was a second photo of Jackson in uniform wearing his cap. The paper print is with the Naomi Jackson Groves fonds, MG30 D351 / R7316, vol. 1211, File 119, Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa. It is a platinum palladium print 15.4 × 20.6 cm (bottom corners damaged). (E-mail from Sophie Tellier, Reference Archivist, Library and Archives Canada, to C. Hill, October 31, 2019.) A portrait of Jackson in uniform by Harold Mortimer-Lamb is in File 122 in the same collection.

70 Dyonnet, Mémoires, 53–6.

71 Robert Harris’ report on the Montreal Life Class in the RCA Minute books, meeting of December 23, 1898. He is identified as “Gould, gentleman” (RCA fonds, vol. 1, Minute Book 2).

72 At the Art Association of Montreal Spring Exhibition, March 8–23, 1901, cat. 25, O.M. Gould, Esq.

73 A. Scott Carter, Kenneth Forbes, J.W.L. Forster, Wyly Grier, Emanuel Hahn, Gustav Hahn, Henri Hébert, Arthur Heming, C.W. Jefferys, F. McGillivray Knowles, Arthur Lismer, and the early print of R.F. Gagen.

74 Copy of a printed article from the Montreal periodical The Passing Show V, no. 12 (November 1931): 16.

75 Lovell’s Montreal Directory for 1896–97, 443, lists F. Sweet, janitor of the Art Association of Montreal at 23 Phillips Sq. The still life by E. Ulric Lamarche, exhibited at the Art Association of Montreal Spring Exhibition, 1897 cat. 87 is illustrated in “Art Exhibition” in the Montreal Witness, March 31, 1897. The inscription on the album sheet cannot argue for Lamarche having assembled the album, as this is the last photograph in the album, and the Hammond portraits on the preceding pages postdate Lamarche’s death in 1921.

76 A photograph of Dyonnet’s painting The Last Crust of 1892. The same photograph is in the Dyonnet fonds at the University of Ottawa (Ph9–10). Other photos in that fonds, which came from Dyonnet’s niece Gabrielle Lorin, are mounted on the backs of the 1918 RCA invitation (Ph9-9, Ph9-4, Ph9-14).

77 The Last Crust, Boy Playing Mandolin, title unknown [Farmer loading hay on cart pulled by oxen], Portrait of Reverend Theo Lafleur, and a portrait of a man in academic robes.

78 The photograph of Fred Haines is incorrectly identified as Leatherdale, Toronto, the name of the photographer written on the back of the print.

79 T.R. Lee, Ingersoll, Ontario to the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, June 4 [1949] in Library and Archives, National Gallery of Canada, file 7.1-Jackson, file 6. Lee authored A History of the Town of Baie d’Urfé, Quebec (Montreal, 1977).

80 T.R. Lee, Albert H. Robinson: The Painter’s Painter (privately printed Montreal 1956); T.R. Lee, “An Artist Inspects Upper Canada: The Diary of Daniel Fowler, 1843,” Ontario History vol. L, no. 4 (1958): 211–18; T.R. Lee, “The Artist Turns Farmer: Chapters from the Autobiography of Daniel Fowler,” Ontario History vol. 52, no. 2 (1960): 98–110.

81 See note 79.

82 A copy of Dyonnet’s memoirs in the National Gallery Library has T.R. Lee’s bookplate, designed by Thoreau MacDonald, and inserted are a six-page typed account of Lee’s production of the mimeographed book and a short article on Dyonnet by Lee dated March 1953, together with a note from William Colgate to Lee dated October 5, 1953 with two typed pages of Colgate’s editorial questions on Dyonnet’s autobiography.

83 Thomas Roche Lee Collection, CA OTAG SC014, E.P. Taylor Research Library and Archives, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. Lee’s collection also includes letters from artists to art writers William Colgate and Albert Laberge.

84 Among the photographs Lee had collected and offered to the National Gallery in 1954 was a photograph of Kenneth Forbes’ painting, The Catch, a portrait of Col. D.S. Forbes in the Ottawa album (no. 108) (T.R. Lee, Baie d’Urfé to R.H. Hubbard, Ottawa, May 25, 1954, in the Library and Archives, National Gallery of Canada, file 1.8-Lee).

85 The inscriptions on Hammond’s photo of the 1880 RCA jury appear to be in Lee’s hand.

All portraits are identified in ink, printed on the album page below the photograph. Titles are given here as inscribed, unless misidentified. Other inscriptions in other hands are noted here. Members of the Pen and Pencil Club are identified with asterisks.

Inscribed in black marker on cover: ARTISTS &/Architects/Circa 1908–1918 (fig. 1).

  • P. 1 verso:

    1.

    Edmond Dyonnet, F.S. Challener c. 1911

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.3 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • Dyonnet hosted the Toronto artist Fred Challener (1867–1959) as a guest at the Pen and Pencil Club meetings of 11 February and 25 March 1911.

    Fig. A1. Edmond Dyonnet, F.S. Challener c. 1911. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.3 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    2.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W. Cruikshank c. 1895–97

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • The Toronto artist William Cruikshank (1848–1922) painted at Beaupré in 1895 and 1897, on the latter occasion with Dyonnet.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of William Cruikshank is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

    Fig. A2. Edmond Dyonnet, W. Cruikshank c. 1895–97. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    3.

    Unknown photographer, J.C. Miles date unknown

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • John Christopher Miles (1837–1911) was a Saint John, NB artist.

Fig. A3. Unknown photographer, J.C. Miles date unknown. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

  • P. 2 recto:

    4.

    Edmond Dyonnet, R. G. Mathews c. 1903

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • Inscribed below the print: G.R. Matthews

    • Richard George Mathews (1870–1955) worked for the Montreal Star and moved to London, England in 1908. “Montreal News,” Printer and Publisher, vol. XVII, no. 3 (March 1908): 58. The Pen and Pencil Club member George Murray published Men and Women Merely Players. Some Drawings by R.G. Mathews (Montreal: The Renaissance Press) in 1903.

    Fig. A4. Edmond Dyonnet, R. G. Mathews c. 1903. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    5.

    Edmond Dyonnet, O.R. Jacobi 1891 *

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.6 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • The painter Otto Jacobi (1812–1901) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from March 17, 1890 to April 1891, when he moved to Toronto.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Jacobi is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

    Fig. A5. Edmond Dyonnet, O.R. Jacobi 1891. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.6 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    6.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Robert Harris c. 1891–96*

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • The artist Robert Harris (1849–1919) was a charter member of the Pen and Pencil Club on 5 March 1890. An engraved detail of this portrait was illustrated in “Some Representative Canadian Sculptors & Painters,” Montreal Daily Witness, April 2, 1898.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Harris is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

Fig. A6. Edmond Dyonnet, Robert Harris c. 1891–96. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

  • P. 2 verso:

    7.

    M.O. Hammond, R. F. Gagen c. 1910

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 14.0 × 9.6 cm (image 13.8 × 9.3 cm)

    • A toned print of the same photograph is on page 25 in the M.O. Hammond album Canadian Artists, in the Library and Archives National Gallery of Canada.

    • A print of Dyonnet’s portrait of the Toronto artist Robert Gagen (1847–1926) is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P021).

    Fig. A7. M.O. Hammond, R. F. Gagen c. 1910. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 14.0 × 9.6 cm (image 13.8 × 9.3 cm)

    8.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W.H. Clapp 1913*

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 ×7.8 cm)

    • The painter William Henry Clapp (1879–1954) returned from Europe in 1908 and was elected a member of the Pen and Pencil Club on April 5, 1913.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Clapp is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

    Fig. A8. Edmond Dyonnet, W.H. Clapp 1913. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 ×7.8 cm)

    9.

    Edmond Dyonnet, A.D. Rosaire date unknown

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 11.0 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • A former pupil of Dyonnet’s at the Council of Arts and Manufactures, the painter Arthur Dominique Rosaire (1879–1922), moved to Los Angeles for health reasons in 1917.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Rosaire is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

Fig. A9. Edmond Dyonnet, A.D. Rosaire date unknown. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 11.0 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

  • P. 3 recto:

    10.

    Edmond Dyonnet, F.M. Bell-Smith c. 1910

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.6 × 11.3 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The painter Frederic Marlett Bell-Smith (1846–1923) attended meetings of the Royal Canadian Academy Council in Montreal in November 1910 when Dyonnet became treasurer. Comparison with other photographs of Bell-Smith suggests a date around 1910.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of F.M. Bell-Smith is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

    Fig. A10. Edmond Dyonnet, F.M. Bell-Smith c. 1910. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.6 × 11.3 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    Horatio Walker photo removed

    • Dyonnet’s photograph of the painter Horatio Walker (1858–1938) is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P070). See fig. 11.

    11.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Self-portrait c. 1912 *

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • One of four self-portraits by Edmond Dyonnet (1859–1954) in the album.

    • G. Horne Russell’s portrait of Dyonnet, first exhibited in 1922, was painted from this photograph. See figs. 16 and 17.

Fig. A11. Edmond Dyonnet, Self-portrait c. 1912. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm).

  • P. 3 verso:

    12.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Homer Watson c. 1902–10

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 16.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The painter Homer Watson (1855–1936) of Doon, Ontario, was a guest at the Pen and Pencil Club on several occasions from 1902 on. On 19 February 1910 he, Edmund Morris, Curtis Williamson, and Archibald Browne attended a club meeting on the occasion of the Canadian Art Club’s exhibition at the Art Association of Montreal.

    • A second photograph of Watson by Dyonnet is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P073).

    Fig. A12. Edmond Dyonnet, Homer Watson c. 1902–10. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 16.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    13.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J.C. Pinhey c. 1891–96*

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.0 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • The painter John Charles Pinhey (1860–1912) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from May 2 to December 12, 1891, when he moved to Hudson, QC, not far from Montreal. The portrait drawings that Pinhey and Dyonnet made of each other at the club meeting of 2 May 1891 are at the McCord Museum (M966.176.34 and M966.176.35).

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Pinhey is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

    Fig. A13. Edmond Dyonnet, J.C. Pinhey c. 1891–96. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.0 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • J.W. Morrice photo removed

      • Dyonnet’s portrait of the artist James Wilson Morrice (1865–1924) is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P052), and in a private collection.

      • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Morrice is a copy of a detail of Dyonnet’s photograph.

  • P. 4 recto:

    14.

    Edmond Dyonnet, A.Y. Jackson 1915

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 14.2 × 9.6 cm (image 13.8 × 9.4 cm)

    • Inscribed in ballpoint at right: 1918.

    • The artist A.Y. Jackson (1882–1974) had been a student of Dyonnet’s at the Council of Arts and Manufactures school from 1896 to 1899. A second portrait by Dyonnet of A.Y. Jackson in military uniform and wearing his cap is in a private collection.

    Fig. A14. Edmond Dyonnet, A.Y. Jackson 1915. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 14.2 × 9.6 cm (image 13.8 × 9.4 cm)

    15.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Gustav Hahn c. 1907

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.0 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • The Toronto artist Gustav Hahn (1866–1962) attended meetings of the Royal Canadian Academy Council in Montreal in 1907 and 1913.

    Fig. A15. Edmond Dyonnet, Gustav Hahn c. 1907. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.0 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    16.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Alphonse Jongers c. 1896 *

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • The painter Alphonse Jongers (1872–1945), the half-brother of Maxime Ingres (no. 90), was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from October 31, 1896. In the catalogues of the 1897 and 1898 Spring exhibitions at the Art Association of Montreal his address is given as the Fraser Institute. An engraved detail of this portrait was illustrated in “Some Representative Canadian Sculptors & Painters,” Montreal Daily Witness, 2 April 1898.

    • A second portrait of Jongers by Dyonnet is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P041).

Fig. A16. Edmond Dyonnet, Alphonse Jongers c. 1896. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

  • P. 4 verso:

    17.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E. Wyly Grier c. 1899 *

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.3 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The Toronto artist Edmund Wyly Grier (1862–1957) was proposed as a non-resident member of the Pen and Pencil Club by K.R. Macpherson and Paul Lafleur on November 19, 1892 and elected December 3, 1892. Photographed against a hanging cloth background, this was more likely taken when Grier was on the Royal Canadian Academy Council at meetings in Montreal in 1899.

Fig. A17. Edmond Dyonnet, E. Wyly Grier c. 1899. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.3 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 5 recto:

    18.

    Edmond Dyonnet, R.J. Wickenden c. 1905 *

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • Inscribed in ballpoint, in an unknown hand: of Quebec/Restorer etc.

    • The artist Robert John Wickenden (1861–1931) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from November 11, 1905.

Fig. A18. Edmond Dyonnet, R.J. Wickenden c. 1905. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 5 verso:

    19.

    Edmond Dyonnet, A.D. Patterson c. 1909*

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.1 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The artist Andrew Dickson Patterson (1854–1930) became a member of the Pen and Pencil Club on October 23, 1909.

Fig. A19. Edmond Dyonnet, A.D. Patterson c. 1909. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.1 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 6 recto:

    20.

    Edmond Dyonnet, C.J. Way 1899*

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • Having recently returned from Switzerland, the artist Charles John Way (1835–1919) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from January 7, 1899 to October 21, 1900. He had a studio at the Fraser Institute 1899–1900.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of C.J. Way is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

Fig. A20. Edmond Dyonnet, C.J. Way 1899. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 6 verso:

    21.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Edmund Morris c. 1905

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The Toronto artist Edmund Morris (1871–1913) was a guest of Dyonnet’s at the Pen and Pencil Club meeting on October 28, 1905.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Morris is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

Fig. A21. Edmond Dyonnet, Edmund Morris c. 1905. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 7 recto:

    22.

    Edmond Dyonnet, A.C. Williamson c. 1907–10

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The Toronto artist Albert Curtis Williamson (1867–1944) painted at Beaupré in the summer of 1904 with Dyonnet and Edmund Morris and was elected to the RCA in Montreal in 1907. He was a guest of William Brymner at the Pen and Pencil Club meetings of December 17 and 31, 1910.

    • A second portrait of Williamson by Dyonnet is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P077).

Fig. A22. Edmond Dyonnet, A.C. Williamson c. 1907–10. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 7 verso:

    • M.A. Suzor-Coté photo removed

      • See no. 88.

  • P. 8 recto:

    23.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J.C. Franchère c. 1905

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The artist Joseph Charles Franchère (1866–1921) was elected an Associate of the Royal Canadian Academy in 1902 and had a solo exhibition at the Art Association of Montreal in December 1904. A detail of this photograph was reproduced in M.J. Mount, “Joseph Franchère and his Work,” The Canadian Century II, no. 4 (30 July 1910): 121.

    • M.O. Hammond’s photo of Franchère is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

Fig. A23. Edmond Dyonnet, J.C. Franchère c. 1905. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 8 verso:

    24.

    Edmond Dyonnet, R. Tait McKenzie c. 1908

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The sculptor Robert Tait McKenzie (1867–1938) lectured on anatomy at the school of the Art Association of Montreal in 1899–1900 and had a solo exhibition at the Art Association in April 1908.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of McKenzie is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

Fig. A24. Edmond Dyonnet, R. Tait McKenzie c. 1908. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 9 recto:

    • F.W. Hutchison photo removed

    • Prints of Dyonnet’s portrait of the artist Frederick W. Hutchison are in McCord album MP-1980-197.17, in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P036), and in a private collection. See fig. 5.

  • P. 9 verso:

    25.

    Edmond Dyonnet, F. Brownell c. 1910

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The Ottawa artist Franklin Brownell (1857–1946) was in Montreal for the meetings of the Royal Canadian Academy Council in 1902 and 1910.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Franklin Brownell is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

Fig. A25. Edmond Dyonnet, F. Brownell c. 1910. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 10 recto:

    26.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Charles Gill c. 1910*

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • In the painted portrait of the artist and poet Charles Gill (1871–1918) that Dyonnet exhibited in 1901 (Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec –1938.15), the artist is thinner and younger. Dyonnet’s photograph probably postdates the photograph “Charles Gill jouant aux échecs en 1908,” reproduced in La vie culturelle á Montréal vers 1900 (Saint-Laurent: Fides, 2005), 279.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Gill is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

Fig. A26. Edmond Dyonnet, Charles Gill c. 1910. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 10 verso:

    27.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W.St.T. Smith 1904

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The artist William St. Thomas Smith (1862–1947) attended a Pen and Pencil Club meeting on 26 November 1904 and had a solo exhibition at the Art Association of Montreal in December.

Fig. A27. Edmond Dyonnet, W.St.T. Smith 1904. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 11 recto:

    28.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Charles Huot date unknown

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The artist Charles Huot (1855–1930) taught at the Quebec school of the Council of Arts & Manufactures from 1894 to 1899.

Fig. A28. Edmond Dyonnet, Charles Huot date unknown. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 11 verso:

    29.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J. Hammond c. 1904–10

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • While living in Sackville, NB, the painter John Hammond (1843–1939) maintained a studio in Montreal from 1895 to 1904 and attended RCA Council meetings in Montreal in 1907, 1910, and 1911. A print from the negative of this photo is reproduced here as fig. 8.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of John Hammond is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

Fig. A29. Edmond Dyonnet, J. Hammond c. 1904–10. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 12 recto:

    30.

    Edmond Dyonnet, G.A. Reid c. 1899

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • The Toronto artist George Reid (1860–1947) attended meetings of the Council of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in Montreal in 1899 and 1902. Comparison with other photographs of Reid suggests a date around 1899.

Fig. A30. Edmond Dyonnet, G.A. Reid c. 1899. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 12 verso:

    • Clarence A. Gagnon photo removed

    • Dyonnet’s photograph of the artist Clarence Gagnon is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P022).

  • P. 13 recto:

    31.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Julien c. 1906*

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

    • Dyonnet proposed the artist Henri Julien (1852–1908) as a member of the Pen and Pencil Club December 19, 1891, and he was elected January 16, 1892. In the portraits of Henri Julien painted in 1891 (Art Gallery of Ontario 87/203 and Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec 49.65), Julien is thinner and younger. See figs. 12 and 13.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Julien is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

Fig. A31. Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Julien c. 1906. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm)

  • P. 13 verso:

    32.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Philippe Hébert c. 1907

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • While principally working in Paris, the sculptor Louis-Philippe Hébert (1850–1917) was in Montreal on frequent occasions and was present at RCA meetings in Montreal in 1907 and 1913.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Louis-Philippe Hébert (1850–1917) is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

    Fig. A32. Edmond Dyonnet, Philippe Hébert c. 1907. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    33.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Archibald Browne c. 1910 *

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • Though he was only made a member of the Pen and Pencil Club on 22 December 1923, the photograph of the painter Archibald Browne (1862–1948) was taken earlier. Browne attended a meeting at the Pen and Pencil Club on 19 February 1910 with other Canadian Art Club members, and Dyonnet and Browne were in Paris together in the summer of 1910.

Fig. A33. Edmond Dyonnet, Archibald Browne c. 1910. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

  • P. 14 recto:

    34.

    M.O. Hammond, A. Scott Carter 1927

    • Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wider border, 11.6 × 8.6 cm (image 10.6 × 7.8 cm)

    • In his diary, Hammond noted that he photographed the Toronto artist Scott Carter (1881–1968) on October 25, 1927.

    Fig. A34. M.O. Hammond, A. Scott Carter 1927. Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wider border, 11.6 × 8.6 cm (image 10.6 × 7.8 cm)

    35.

    M.O. Hammond, Gustav Hahn 1927

    • Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wider border, 11.8 × 8.8 cm (image 10.8 × 7.8 cm)

    • In his diary, Hammond noted that he photographed the Toronto artist Gustav Hahn (1866–1962) on November 1, 1927.

Fig. A35. M.O. Hammond, Gustav Hahn 1927. Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wider border, 11.8 × 8.8 cm (image 10.8 × 7.8 cm)

  • P. 14 verso:

    36.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen 1896*

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • Dyonnet nominated the Montreal artist Maurice Cullen (1866–1934) for membership in the Pen and Pencil Club on October 31, 1896 and he was elected November 14, 1896. See also photograph 49.

    • A second and later portrait of Cullen by Dyonnet is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P017).

    Fig. A36. Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen 1896. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    37.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W. Hope c. 1891–96*

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • Montreal artist William Hope (1863–1931) was a charter member of the Pen and Pencil Club on March 5, 1890.

    • M.O. Hammond’s portrait of Hope is a copy of a detail of this photograph.

Fig. A37. Edmond Dyonnet, W. Hope c. 1891–96. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.8 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

  • P. 15 recto:

    38.

    Edmond Dyonnet, G. Horne Russell c. 1912*

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • The Montreal artist G. Horne Russell (1861–1933) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from March 9, 1912.

    Fig. A38. Edmond Dyonnet, G. Horne Russell c. 1912. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    39.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J.W. Beatty c. 1913

    • Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • The Toronto artist J.W. Beatty (1869–1941) attended RCA Council meetings in Montreal in November 1913.

Fig. A39. Edmond Dyonnet, J.W. Beatty c. 1913. Matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.1 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

  • P. 15 verso:

    40.

    M.O. Hammond, Arthur Lismer 1927

    • Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wide border, 11.8 × 8.8 cm (image 10.6 × 7.8 cm)

    • In his diary, Hammond noted that he photographed the Toronto artist Arthur Lismer (1885–1969) on November 29, 1927

    Fig. A40. M.O. Hammond, Arthur Lismer 1927. Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wide border, 11.8 × 8.8 cm (image 10.6 × 7.8 cm)

    41.

    M.O. Hammond, Emanuel Hahn 1927

    • Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wide border, 11.8 × 8.8 cm (image 10.7× 7.8 cm)

    • In his diary, Hammond noted that he photographed the Toronto sculptor Emanuel Hahn (1881–1957) on October 25, 1927.

Fig. A41. M.O. Hammond, Emanuel Hahn 1927. Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wide border, 11.8 × 8.8 cm (image 10.7× 7.8 cm)

  • P. 16 recto:

    42.

    M.O. Hammond, J.W.L. Forster 1927

    • Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wide border, 11.2 × 8.6 cm (image 9.9 × 7.2 cm)

    • In his diary, Hammond noted that he photographed the Toronto artist J.W.L. Forster (1850–1938) on November 1, 1927.

    Fig. A42. M.O. Hammond, J.W.L. Forster 1927. Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wide border, 11.2 × 8.6 cm (image 9.9 × 7.2 cm)

    43.

    M.O. Hammond, Arthur Heming 1927

    • Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wide border, 11.2 × 8.6 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

    • In his diary, Hammond noted that he photographed the Toronto artist Heming (1870–1940) on November 3 and 15, 1927.

Fig. A43. M.O. Hammond, Arthur Heming 1927. Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wide border, 11.2 × 8.6 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm)

  • P. 16 verso:

    44.

    M.O. Hammond, C.W. Jefferys 1927

    • Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wider border, 12.2 × 9.5 cm (image 10.0 × 7.3 cm)

    • In his diary, Hammond noted that he photographed the Toronto artist C.W. Jefferys (1869–1951) on November 8, 1927.

    Fig. A44. M.O. Hammond, C.W. Jefferys 1927. Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wider border, 12.2 × 9.5 cm (image 10.0 × 7.3 cm)

    45.

    M.O. Hammond, Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen, G. Horne Russell 1926

    • Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wider border, 8.8 × 11.0 cm (image 7.8 × 10.0 cm)

    • In his diary, Hammond noted that he photographed the Montreal artists Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen, and G. Horne Russell at the Arts and Letters Club in Toronto on November 18, 1926.

Fig. A45. M.O. Hammond, Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen, G. Horne Russell 1926. Glossy gelatin black and white silver print with wider border, 8.8 × 11.0 cm (image 7.8 × 10.0 cm)

  • P. 17 recto:

    46.

    Unknown photographer, Claire Fauteux date unknown

    • Glossy toned gelatin silver print with no border imitating albumen print, 10.1 × 6.4 cm

    • A snapshot of the Montreal painter Claire Fauteux (1890–1988) playing golf.

    Fig. A46. Unknown photographer, Claire Fauteux date unknown. Glossy toned gelatin silver print with no border imitating albumen print, 10.1 × 6.4 cm

    • William Brymner photo removed*

      • There are at least two Pen and Pencil Club portraits by Dyonnet of the artist William Brymner (1855–1925), fig. 31 and a second portrait in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds in the Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P009).

      • Hammond’s portrait of Brymner is a copy of a detail of this latter photograph.

  • P. 17 verso:

    47.

    Unknown photographer, Margaret Houghton date unknown

    • Matt toned gelatin silver print with no border, 14.0 × 10.6 cm

    • The Montreal painter Margaret Houghton (1865–c. 1922) was the sister of Frank Houghton (1862–after 1931), a member of the Pen and Pencil Club, whose photograph by Edmond Dyonnet is in the Confederation Centre Art Gallery (CAG H 1921 v) and the Pen and Pencil Club fonds in the Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P034).

    Fig. A47. Unknown photographer, Margaret Houghton date unknown. Matt toned gelatin silver print with no border, 14.0 × 10.6 cm

    48.

    William Notman, William Fraser 1871

    • Albumen print with no border, 6.8 × 8.7 cm (irregular)

    • The Montreal artist William Lewis Fraser (1841–1905), brother of the painter John Fraser (1838–1898), worked for the photographer William Notman from 1865 to 1875.

Fig. A48. William Notman, William Fraser 1871. Albumen print with no border, 6.8 × 8.7 cm (irregular)

  • P. 18 recto:

    49.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen 1897

    • Matt silver gelatin print on thin paper with no border, 12.8 × 10.1 cm

    • Inscribed below photograph in ballpoint: 1897

    • This photograph of Maurice Cullen (1866–1934) painting at Beaupré was probably taken by Dyonnet to illustrate the use of the “Corot” easel he designed. See figs. 12 and 13.

    Fig. A49. Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen 1897. Matt silver gelatin print on thin paper with no border, 12.8 × 10.1 cm

    50.

    Attributed to Edmond Dyonnet, Wm. Brymner c. 1891–1896 *

    • Matt silver gelatin print with no border, 12.0 × 9.8 cm

    • This informal photograph of the artist William Brymner (1855–1925) may have been taken in Edmond Dyonnet’s studio. In another Dyonnet photograph of Brymner (private collection), Brymner handles the Roman Tanagra figure visible on the shelf behind him in this studio portrait, and the chair Brymner is sitting on is seen in other Dyonnet photographs (E. Wyly Grier, no. 17, Paul Lafleur, no.61, and George Murray, no. 63).

Fig. A50. Attributed to Edmond Dyonnet, Wm. Brymner c. 1891–1896. Matt silver gelatin print with no border, 12.0 × 9.8 cm

  • P. 18 verso:

    51.

    Unknown photographer, Wm. Brymner c. 1910 *

    • Glossy toned silver gelatin print with no border, 10.7 × 8.2 cm

    • This photograph of William Brymner (1855–1925) was reproduced in M.J. Mount, “William Brymner and His Work,” The Canadian Century, 11 June 1910, 7.

    Fig. A51. Unknown photographer, Wm. Brymner c. 1910. Glossy toned silver gelatin print with no border, 10.7 × 8.2 cm

    52.

    Unknown photographer, E. Dyonnet & E. Rimbault Dibdin 1910

    • Glossy toned silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • E. Rimbault Dibdin (1853–1941) was curator of the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool, where Dyonnet installed the Royal Canadian Academy’s exhibition of Canadian art in 1910.

Fig. A52. Unknown photographer, E. Dyonnet & E. Rimbault Dibdin 1910. Glossy toned silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

  • P. 19 recto:

    53.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet 1897*

    • Glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.7 × 8.3 cm

    • This photograph of Dyonnet (1859–1954) painting at Beaupré was probably taken by Dyonnet to illustrate the use of the “Corot” easel he designed. See fig. 13 and photograph 49. The painting on the easel was reproduced in “Some Representative Canadian Sculptors and Painters,” Montreal Daily Witness, April 2, 1898.

    Fig. A53. Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet 1897. Glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.7 × 8.3 cm

    54.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet c. 1910 *

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 12.8 × 10.1 cm

    • At the Pen and Pencil Club meeting of December 3, 1910, William Brymner announced that Dyonnet had been appointed “Officier de l’Académie de la France,” possibly the decoration on his lapel. Dyonnet appears to be about the same age as in his photograph with E. Rambault Dibdin (photograph 52).

Fig. A54. Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet c. 1910. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 12.8 × 10.1 cm

  • P. 19 verso:

    55.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E. Boyd c. 1908–9

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    • A former pupil of Dyonnet’s, the painter Edward Finley Boyd (1878–1964), is listed in the catalogue of the 1909 Art Association of Montreal Spring exhibition at 255 Bleury Street with G.W. Hill and W.H. Clapp.

    Fig. A55. Edmond Dyonnet, E. Boyd c. 1908–9. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    56.

    Unknown photographer, Ovid Gould date unknown

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 9.8 × 13.7 cm

    • Ovid M. Gould (?–1911) was a member of the Art Association of Montreal from 1893 to 1911 and attended the Royal Canadian Academy’s Life Class with Dyonnet in 1898. In the Art Association of Montreal’s 1901 Spring Exhibition, Dyonnet exhibited a painted portrait of Gould. Lovell’s Montreal Directory of 1900–1901 lists “O.M. Gould, managing director, Gould Cold Storage Co. Ltd.”

Fig. A56. Unknown photographer, Ovid Gould date unknown. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 9.8 × 13.7 cm

  • P. 20 recto:

    57.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Fabien 1902

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 9.8 × 6.8 cm

    • In the photograph on his identity card for the 1900 Paris Exposition, the painter Henri Fabien (1878–1935) has a similar beard. Dyonnet painted two portraits of Fabien without a beard (National Gallery of Canada (28119) and Art Gallery of Ontario (69/30)).

    Fig. A57. Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Fabien 1902. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 9.8 × 6.8 cm

    58.

    Edmond Dyonnet, James Smith c. 1910

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 14.5 × 10.2 cm

    • The Toronto architect James Smith (1832–1918) was Secretary–Treasurer of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts from 1880 to 1910, when Dyonnet took over the position of Treasurer at the Academy’s Meetings in Montreal.

Fig. A58. Edmond Dyonnet, James Smith c. 1910. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 14.5 × 10.2 cm

  • P. 20 verso:

    59.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J. Try-Davies c. 1891–6*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • The stockbroker and author John Try-Davies (1839–1911) was always listed in Lovell’s Montreal Directory as Davies, but he hyphenated his name to Try-Davies on the photograph card in the Robert Harris fonds (CAG H-1921 y) and on the title page of his book, A Semi-detached House, and Other Stories (Montreal: J. Lovell, 1900), illustrated by Harris and dedicated to the Pen and Pencil Club.

    Fig. A59. Edmond Dyonnet, J. Try-Davies c. 1891–6. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    60.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J.E. Logan c. 1891–6*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 11.6 × 9.2 cm

    • The insurance broker John Edward Logan (1852–1915) was a charter member of the Pen and Pencil Club on March 5, 1890, and wrote under the pseudonym Barrie Dane. He published A Cry from the Saskatchewan (Montreal: Robinson, 1885), and his book Verses was posthumously published by the Pen and Pencil Club in 1916.

Fig. A60. Edmond Dyonnet, J.E. Logan c. 1891–6. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 11.6 × 9.2 cm

  • P. 21 recto:

    61.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Paul T. Lafleur c. 1891–6*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • Paul T. Lafleur (1860–1924), professor of English at McGill University, was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from March 17, 1890. Dyonnet also photographed his brother, the McGill professor Henri-Amédée Lafleur (1862–1939) (Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P043). Dyonnet exhibited painted portraits of Paul T. Lafleur at the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 1904, of his brother, the lawyer Eugène Lafleur, in 1906, and of their father, the Reverend Théodore Lafleur, in 1907.

    • Lafleur is photographed against the papered screen. All prints of this photograph seen by the author have damage centre left.

    Fig. A61. Edmond Dyonnet, Paul T. Lafleur c. 1891–6. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    62.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Paul T. Lafleur c. 1898 *

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • A second photograph of Lafleur (1860–1924), wearing a beard and glasses, taken at a later date against a hanging cloth background.

Fig. A62. Edmond Dyonnet, Paul T. Lafleur c. 1898. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

  • P. 21 verso:

    63.

    Edmond Dyonnet, George Murray c. 1896*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • The classics master at the Montreal High School, George Murray (1830–1910), was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from January 11, 1896. In 1903 he published Men and Women Merely Players. Some Drawings by R.G. Mathews (Montreal: The Renaissance Press). See no. 4.

    Fig. A63. Edmond Dyonnet, George Murray c. 1896. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    64.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. Andrew Macphail c. 1897*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • Inscribed below the photograph in ball point: (Sir)

    • A professor at Bishop’s College and McGill and later the editor of the University Magazine (1907–20), Dr. Andrew Macphail (1864–1938) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from March 20, 1897.

Fig. A64. Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. Andrew Macphail c. 1897. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

  • P. 22 recto:

    65.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Norman Rielle c. 1891–6*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 12.1 × 9.4 cm

    • The lawyer Norman T. Rielle , K.C. (dates unknown), was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from March 17, 1890. In 1890 he was a law partner with Eugène Lafleur, brother of Paul Lafleur, in Lafleur & Rielle and is listed in Lovell’s Montreal Directory until 1902. Rielle lectured on “Some Modern French Song Writers” at the Art Association of Montreal in February 1892 and on “Some American Songs and Song Writers” in May 1898.

    Fig. A65. Edmond Dyonnet, Norman Rielle c. 1891–6. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 12.1 × 9.4 cm

    66.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Wm. McLennan c. 1891–6*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 11.5 × 9.1 cm

    • The notary and author William McLennan (1856–1904) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from March 17, 1890, and the president of the Fraser Institute from 1898 to 1902. Louis-Philippe Hébert sculpted his posthumous bust of McLennan from Dyonnet’s photograph. See figs. 24 and 25.

Fig. A66. Edmond Dyonnet, Wm. McLennan c. 1891–6. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 11.5 × 9.1 cm

  • P. 22 verso:

    67.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. T.J.W. Burgess c. 1894*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • The superintendent of the Protestant Hospital for the Insane in Verdun, QC, Dr. Thomas Joseph Workman Burgess (1849–1926), was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from November 24, 1894. He presented a paper on “Art and the Insane” at the club meeting of March 15, 1902.

    Fig. A67. Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. T.J.W. Burgess c. 1894. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    68.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Dean F.P. Walton c. 1899*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • Frederick Parker Walton (1858–1948), Dean of the Faculty of Law at McGill University, was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from April 1, 1899.

Fig. A68. Edmond Dyonnet, Dean F.P. Walton c. 1899. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

  • P. 23 recto:

    69.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet c. 1905*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    • Photographed against a cloth hanging, Dyonnet (1859–1954) is seated in a high-backed upholstered chair, not seen in any of his other portraits.

    Fig. A69. Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet c. 1905. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    70.

    Edmond Dyonnet, L.R. Gregor c. 1903*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • Lecturer in linguistics at McGill University, Leigh Richmond Gregor (1860–1911) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from November 7, 1903.

Fig. A70. Edmond Dyonnet, L.R. Gregor c. 1903. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

  • P. 23 verso:

    71.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Forbes Torrance c. 1891–6*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • Manufacturer’s agent Forbes Torrance (1851–1896) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from March 29, 1890. He was the father of the painter Lilias Torrance Newton (1896–1980).

    Fig. A71. Edmond Dyonnet, Forbes Torrance c. 1891–6. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    72.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J.B. Abbott c. 1902*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 12.3 × 10.3 cm

    • Son of Sir John Abbott, President of the Fraser Institute 1870–93 and Prime Minister of Canada 1891–2, John Bethune Abbott (1851–1929) was a lawyer and curator of the Art Association of Montreal from 1901 to 1924. He was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from April 12, 1902.

Fig. A72. Edmond Dyonnet, J.B. Abbott c. 1902. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 12.3 × 10.3 cm

  • P. 24 recto:

    73.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W.S. Maxwell c. 1907*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    • The architect William Sutherland Maxwell (1874–1952) was elected a member of the Pen and Pencil Club on December 21, 1907.

    Fig. A73. Edmond Dyonnet, W.S. Maxwell c. 1907. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    74.

    Edmond Dyonnet, K.R. Macpherson c. 1892–6*

    • Toned matt silver gelatin print with no border, 11.8 × 10.0 cm

    • The lawyer and amateur artist Kenneth Rose Macpherson (1861–1916) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from January 16, 1892. Here he is photographed against the papered screen. See also photograph 82.

Fig. A74. Edmond Dyonnet, K.R. Macpherson c. 1892–6. Toned matt silver gelatin print with no border, 11.8 × 10.0 cm

  • P. 24 verso:

    75.

    Edmond Dyonnet, P.E. Nobbs c. 1906*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 
10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • The architect Percy Erskine Nobbs (1875–1964) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from December 1, 1906. See also photograph 77.

    Fig. A75. Edmond Dyonnet, P.E. Nobbs c. 1906. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 
10.8 × 8.2 cm

    76.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Stephen Leacock c. 1901*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • The author and McGill University professor Stephen Leacock (1869–1944) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from December 7, 1901.

Fig. A76. Edmond Dyonnet, Stephen Leacock c. 1901. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

  • P. 25 recto:

    77.

    Edmond Dyonnet, P.E. Nobbs c. 1908*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    • A damaged variant portrait of the architect Percy Erskine Nobbs (1875–1964) wearing a scarf and coat, possibly taken at a somewhat later date then photograph 75. Another print of this portrait is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P055).

    Fig. A77. Edmond Dyonnet, P.E. Nobbs c. 1908. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    78.

    Edmond Dyonnet, C.M. Holt c. 1902*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • This print has been printed reversed. The correct orientation can be seen in McCord album MP-1980.197.18.

    • The lawyer Charles MacPherson Holt (1862–c. 1950) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from December 13, 1902.

Fig. A78. Edmond Dyonnet, C.M. Holt c. 1902. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

  • P. 25 verso:

    79.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Karl Boissevain c. 1898*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • The Consul General of the Netherlands in Montreal, Karel Boissevain (1866–?), was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from January 8, 1898. He returned to the Netherlands in 1901.

    Fig. A79. Edmond Dyonnet, Karl Boissevain c. 1898. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    80.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E.W. Arthy c. 1892–6*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • Edward Westhead Arthy (c. 1853–1914), the secretary-superintendent of Montreal’s Protestant Board of School Commissioners, was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from December 17, 1892.

Fig. A80. Edmond Dyonnet, E.W. Arthy c. 1892–6. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

  • P. 26 recto:

    81.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J. O’Flaherty c. 1896*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • The journalist and prominent Irish activist John Joseph Calvin O’Flaherty (1855–?) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from January 11, 1896 to October 16, 1897, but attended meetings from 1903 through 1910.

    Fig. A81. Edmond Dyonnet, J. O’Flaherty c. 1896. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    82.

    Edmond Dyonnet, K.R. Macpherson c. 1898*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • A second photograph of the lawyer Kenneth Rose Macpherson (1861–1916) by Dyonnet, photographed against a hanging cloth background. See no. 74.

Fig. A82. Edmond Dyonnet, K.R. Macpherson c. 1898. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

  • P. 26 verso:

    83.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Guillaume Couture c. 1910*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • The conductor and composer Guillaume Couture (1851–1915) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from October 1892, becoming an honorary member on January 13, 1894. He had a studio at the Fraser Institute in 1910. See fig. 8.

    Fig. A83. Edmond Dyonnet, Guillaume Couture c. 1910. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    84.

    Edmond Dyonnet, G.W. Hill c. 1907*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    • The sculptor George William Hill (1862–1934) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from October 26, 1907.

Fig. A84. Edmond Dyonnet, G.W. Hill c. 1907. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

  • P. 27 recto:

    85.

    Edmond Dyonnet, C.E.L. Porteous c. 1898*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.4 cm

    • The businessman and amateur artist Charles Porteous (1848–1926) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from November 19, 1892. Dyonnet painted a portrait of Charles Porteous in 1902.

    • An earlier photograph of Porteous by Dyonnet is in the Robert Harris fonds at the Confederation Centre Art Gallery in Charlottetown (H-1821z) and in McCord albums MP-1980.197.7, MP-1992.11.18, and MP-0000-2569.18.

    Fig. A85. Edmond Dyonnet, C.E.L. Porteous c. 1898. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.4 cm

    86.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W.F. Chipman c. 1908*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 12.8 × 10.1 cm

    • The lawyer, author, McGill professor, and later diplomat Warwick Fielding Chipman (1880–1967) was photographed attired informally in a sweater and scarf. He was elected a member of the Pen and Pencil Club on December 19, 1908. See also photograph 96.

Fig. A86. Edmond Dyonnet, W.F. Chipman c. 1908. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 12.8 × 10.1 cm

  • P. 27 verso:

    • Blank page

  • P. 28 recto:

    87.

    Unknown photographer, [Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté] c. 1930

    • Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 12.8 × 8.7 cm

    • Inscribed in image, l.l., in blue ink: at Miami; in image, l.r., in black ink: “Suzor”; in border, l.r. in blue ink: Suzor Coté

    • A street photograph of the artist Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté (1869–1937) taken after he moved to Florida following his stroke in 1927.

    Fig. A87. Unknown photographer, [Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté] c. 1930. Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 12.8 × 8.7 cm

    88.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Suzor-Coté c. 1909

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 12.7 × 10.1 cm

    • Inscribed below image in ballpoint: Suzor Cote/1909

    • There are two additional photographs of Suzor-Coté (1869–1937) by Dyonnet in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P064 and BM83_2P065). A variant of BM83_2P064 is in a private collection.

    Fig. A88. Edmond Dyonnet, Suzor-Coté c. 1909. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 12.7 × 10.1 cm

    89.

    Unknown photographer, A. Suzor-Coté 1931

    • Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 
13.6 × 8.7 cm

    • Copy of a printed article from the Montreal periodical The Passing Show, vol. V, no. 12 (November 1931): 16, illustrating a photograph of Suzor-Coté (1869–1937) with his sculpture Femmes de Caughnawaga

Fig. A89. Unknown photographer, A. Suzor-Coté 1931. Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 
13.6 × 8.7 cm

  • P. 28 verso:

    90.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Max Ingres c. 1891–1896*

    • Toned matt silver gelatin print with no border, 10.3 × 7.8 cm

    • A professor of French at McGill University, Maxime Ingres (c. 1861–1931), was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from January 30, 1892. Dyonnet exhibited a painted portrait of Ingres at the Art Association of Montreal’s Spring Exhibition in 1894.

    Fig. A90. Edmond Dyonnet, Max Ingres c. 1891–1896. Toned matt silver gelatin print with no border, 10.3 × 7.8 cm

    91.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W. Townsend c. 1895–6*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 
11.5 × 9.4 cm

    • Walter Townsend (?–1905) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from March 3, 1895, and a non-resident member by November 14, 1896, having moved to London, England.

Fig. A91. Edmond Dyonnet, W. Townsend c. 1895–6. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 
11.5 × 9.4 cm

  • P. 29 recto:

    92.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. John McCrae c. 1905*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    • A physician and the author of In Flanders Fields, Dr. John McCrae (1872–1918) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from March 4, 1905.

    Fig. A92. Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. John McCrae c. 1905. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    93.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. J.L. Todd c. 1908*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    • Professor of parasitology at McGill University, Dr. John Lancelot Todd (1876–1949) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from December 19, 1908.

Fig. A93. Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. J.L. Todd c. 1908. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

  • P. 29 verso:

    94.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W. Languedoc c. 1905*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    • Chief compiler of the Law Reports for the Province of Quebec, the lawyer William Charles Languedoc (1846–1914) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from November 11, 1905.

    Fig. A94. Edmond Dyonnet, W. Languedoc c. 1905. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.3 cm

    95.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J. MacNaughton c. 1903*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • Professor of ancient history and classics at McGill University, John MacNaughton (1858–1943) was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club from November 7, 1903.

Fig. A95. Edmond Dyonnet, J. MacNaughton c. 1903. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

  • P. 30 recto:

    96.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W.F. Chipman after 1908*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • The lawyer Warwick Fielding Chipman (1880–1967) was elected a member of the Pen and Pencil Club on December 19, 1908. See also photograph 86.

    Fig. A96. Edmond Dyonnet, W.F. Chipman after 1908. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    97.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W. Herrick c. 1900*

    • Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

    • At the Art Association’s Spring Exhibition in March 1900, Dyonnet exhibited a painted portrait of William Herrick (dates unknown). Herrick attended meetings of the Pen and Pencil Club as a guest of Kenneth Macpherson and Maxime Ingres in 1897 and 1899, respectively, and became a member on December 8, 1900. He only attended one subsequent meeting.

Fig. A97. Edmond Dyonnet, W. Herrick c. 1900. Toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm

  • P. 30 verso:

    98.

    M.O. Hammond, Tom Thomson

    • Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 16.7 × 11.3 cm (image 16.0 × 10.5 cm)

    • Copy of an early photograph of the Toronto painter Tom Thomson (1877–1917) by W.D. McVey, Toronto, c. 1905.

Fig. A98. M.O. Hammond, Tom Thomson. Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 16.7 × 11.3 cm (image 16.0 × 10.5 cm)

  • P. 31 recto

    99.

    M.O. Hammond, Henri Hébert c. 1928*

    • Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 11.1 × 8.4 cm (image 10.0 × 7.3 cm)

    • Hammond offered this portrait of the Montreal sculptor Henri Hébert (1884–1950) in his fifth series on May 10, 1929.

    Fig. A99. M.O. Hammond, Henri Hébert c. 1928. Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 11.1 × 8.4 cm (image 10.0 × 7.3 cm)

    100.

    M.O. Hammond, Kenneth K. Forbes c. 1928

    • Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 11.0 × 8.3 cm (image 10.0 × 7.3 cm)

    • Hammond offered this photograph of the Toronto portrait painter Kenneth Keith Forbes (1892–1980) in his fifth series on May 10, 1929.

Fig. A100. M.O. Hammond, Kenneth K. Forbes c. 1928. Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 11.0 × 8.3 cm (image 10.0 × 7.3 cm)

  • P. 31 verso:

    101.

    M.O. Hammond, F. McGillivray Knowles c. 1930

    • Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 11.1 × 8.5 cm (image 10.0 × 7.3 cm)

    • Hammond offered this portrait of the Toronto artist Farquhar McGillivray Knowles (1859–1931) on May 18, 1930, as a replacement for an earlier portrait.

    Fig. A101. M.O. Hammond, F. McGillivray Knowles c. 1930. Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 11.1 × 8.5 cm (image 10.0 × 7.3 cm)

    • A.Y. Jackson photo removed

      • Dyonnet took two portraits of Jackson (1882–1974) in uniform in June 1915. See no. 14.

  • P. 32 recto

    102.

    M.O. Hammond, John Bell-Smith

    • Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 11.0 × 8.3 cm (image 10.0 × 7.3 cm)

    • Inscribed on sheet, below photograph: John Bellsmith/1853/(self-portrait)

    • Hammond’s photograph of a painted self-portrait of 1853 by John Bell-Smith (1810–83).

    Fig. A102. M.O. Hammond, John Bell-Smith. Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 11.0 × 8.3 cm (image 10.0 × 7.3 cm)

    103.

    M.O. Hammond, R.C.A. Hanging Committee 1880

    • Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 10.5 × 8.6 cm (image 7.4 × 9.4 cm)

    • Inscribed, bottom border, in ink: H. Sandham, ?, ?, ? Napoléon Bourassa; below image, R.C.A. Hanging Committee 1880

    • Copy of a photograph by William Notman of the hanging committee of the first exhibition of the Canadian Academy in Ottawa in March 1880 composed of (standing, left to right) Robert Harris, architect Thomas Seton Scott, Napoléon Bourassa, (seated, left to right) Henry Sandham and James Griffiths.

Fig. A103. M.O. Hammond, R.C.A. Hanging Committee 1880. Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 10.5 × 8.6 cm (image 7.4 × 9.4 cm)

  • P. 32 verso:

    104.

    Unknown Vancouver photographer, John Radford date unknown

    • Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 15.0 × 10.0 cm (image 10.6 × 7.6 cm)

    • Inscribed in border, l.r.: by artist, John Radford/Vancouver

    • The architectural draughtsman and designer John Radford (1860–1940) moved from Toronto to Vancouver in 1902 and was a vocal opponent of modernism in art.

    Fig. A104. Unknown Vancouver photographer, John Radford date unknown. Glossy black and white silver gelatin print, 15.0 × 10.0 cm (image 10.6 × 7.6 cm)

    105.

    M.O. Hammond, E. Wyly Grier 1927

    • Glossy black and white print, 11.4 × 8.7 cm (image 10.5 × 7.8 cm)

    • In his journal, Hammond noted that he photographed the Toronto artist Edmund Wyly Grier (1862–1957) on November 3 and 8, 1927.

Fig. A105. M.O. Hammond, E. Wyly Grier 1927. Glossy black and white print, 11.4 × 8.7 cm (image 10.5 × 7.8 cm)

  • P. 33 recto:

    106.

    Unknown photographer, [Robert Harris, Neil McLennan, Otto Jacobi, William Brymner in Otto Jacobi’s studio] c. 1890

    • Albumen print with no border, 11.6 × 16.9 cm (damaged irregular edges)

    • Inscribed in graphite verso: Paul Peel William Brymner/Robert Harris O.R. Jacobi

    • This photograph was printed reversed. A print in the correct orientation is in the Robert Harris fonds, Confederation Centre Art Gallery (CAGH-8890, fig. 1.1). The subjects, photographed in Jacobi’s studio in the Fraser Institute, are identified in the Charlottetown print, left to right, as W. Brymner, O.R. Jacobi, Neil McLennan, R. Harris/Tough. Here they are, left to right, Robert Harris, Tough (Harris’s dog), Neil McLennan, Otto Jacobi, William Brymner.

Fig. A106. Unknown photographer, [Robert Harris, Neil McLennan, Otto Jacobi, William Brymner in Otto Jacobi’s studio] c. 1890. Albumen print with no border, 11.6 × 16.9 cm (damaged irregular edges)

  • P. 33 verso:

    107.

    Margaret Leatherdale, [Fred Haines] c. 1937

    • Glossy toned silver gelatin print with no border, 
15.1 × 10.0 cm

    • Inscribed verso in graphite: Leatherdale/Toronto; below photo, in ballpoint: Mr. Leatherdale, Toronto

    • The Toronto artist Frederick Haines (1879–1960) was curator of the Art Gallery of Toronto from 1927 to 1932 and principal of the Ontario College of Art from 1932 to 1951.

Fig. A107. Margaret Leatherdale, [Fred Haines] c. 1937. Glossy toned silver gelatin print with no border, 
15.1 × 10.0 cm

  • P. 34 recto:

    108.

    Rapid, Grip & Batten, Montreal, [The Catch, Major D.S. Forbes]

    • Glossy black and white silver gelatin print with no border, 15.0 × 11.7 cm

    • The name of the firm, Rapid, Grip & Batten, is stamped on the back of the print. This portrait of his brother, Major Duncan Stuart Forbes (1889–1965), was painted by Kenneth Keith Forbes (1892–1980) in 1935.

Fig. A108. Rapid, Grip & Batten, Montreal, [The Catch, Major D.S. Forbes]. Glossy black and white silver gelatin print with no border, 15.0 × 11.7 cm

  • P. 34 verso

    109.

    Unknown photographer, Sweet looking at our still life 1897

    • Glossy toned silver gelatin print with no border, 15.2 × 11.0 cm

    • Inscribed in graphite on the album sheet, under the photograph: Sweet looking/at our still life

    • F. Sweet was listed as janitor in the entry for the Art Association of Montreal in Lovell’s Montreal Directory for 1896–7. The still life by Ulric Lamarche was exhibited at the Art Association of Montreal Spring Exhibition in March 1897 (reproduced in “Art Exhibition,” Montreal Daily Witness, 31 March 1897).

Fig. A109. Unknown photographer, Sweet looking at our still life 1897. Glossy toned silver gelatin print with no border, 15.2 × 11.0 cm

Le présent essai identifie les auteurs et les sujets des photographies d’artistes, d’architectes et d’écrivains canadiens que renferme un album de la Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada. Il examine les pratiques photographiques du peintre montréalais Edmond Dyonnet dans le cadre du Pen and Pencil Club de Montréal et du journaliste torontois M.O. Hammond, qui se sont tous deux employés à immortaliser des artistes et des écrivains canadiens. Un inventaire du contenu de l’album est fourni, identifiant les photographes et leurs sujets, et proposant une datation en annexe.

Dans la Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada se trouve un album de photographies portant sur sa couverture la mention au feutre noir « Artists & Architects circa 1908–1918 » (fig. 1). On ignore sa provenance et la personne qui l’a assemblé.

Fig. 1. « Artists & Architects circa 1908-1918 ». Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, Ottawa. Photo : MBAC

Cette mention est en quelque sorte trompeuse, puisque l’album contient des portraits d’artistes et d’architectes canadiens, mais aussi d’écrivains montréalais. Il compte au total 109 photographies1, dont 78 sont des portraits des membres du Pen and Pencil Club de Montréal photographiés par le peintre Edmond Dyonnet (1859 – 1954). Le présent essai s’intéresse au projet de Dyonnet de photographier les membres du club et des collègues, ainsi qu’aux diverses collections de ses photographies. Il tente en outre d’établir la chronologie de ces images, d’identifier les autres photographies de l’album du Musée et d’en cerner la provenance.

Né à Crest, en France en juin 1859, Edmond Dyonnet fait une première visite du Canada avec sa famille en mai 1875. Il retourne ensuite en Europe pour étudier à Turin, à Naples et à Rome. À la fin d’octobre 18902, il revient à Montréal, où il fait rapidement la connaissance de John Pinhey, qui lui trouve un studio dans l’Imperial Building sur la place d’Armes. En mars 1893, il emménage au 1002, rue Dorchester (maintenant le boulevard René-Lévesque) au dernier étage d’une maison occupée par l’école de langues Ingres-Coutellier, exploitée par le Français Maxime Ingres3. En juin 1894, l’école d’Ingres s’est établie à l’Institut Fraser, où Dyonnet a également aménagé son studio4.

L’Institut Fraser servira de toile de fond au projet photographique de Dyonnet. Bibliothèque publique gratuite fondée en 1870, l’Institut Fraser n’a ouvert ses portes qu’en 1885, après avoir acquis Burnside Hall au coin nord-est des rues Dorchester et University. L’Institut proposait à la location des espaces au rez-de-chaussée afin de financer ses activités5. La Faculté de droit de McGill y a occupé des locaux de 1886 à 18956, tandis qu’Otto Jacobi et Robert Harris y ont loué des studios en 18887. Harris décrivait ainsi les lieux :

L’Institut Fraser est un grand édifice au coin nord-ouest [sic] des rues Dorchester et University, non loin du square Phillips, comme vous le verrez sur le plan. Tout l’étage supérieur est occupé par une bibliothèque publique. Le rez-de-chaussée est divisé en plusieurs pièces, dont mon studio, qui donnent sur un vaste hall. Voici une esquisse du plan du rez-de-chaussée [(fig. 2)]. L’entrée sur la rue Dorchester mène à la bibliothèque, et un homme est en poste dans le hall en tout temps. Sur la porte de la rue University, Jacobi et moi avons une plaque en laiton où figurent nos noms8.

Une photographie de l’album du Musée des beaux-arts montre Robert Harris, Otto Jacobi et William Brymner dans le studio de Jacobi à l’Institut Fraser (no 106).

Fig. 2. Plan du rez-de-chaussée de l’Institut Fraser figurant dans une lettre du 19 octobre 1890 envoyée par Robert Harris, de Montréal, à sa mère à Charlottetown. Robert Harris fonds, Musée d’art du Centre de la Confédération, Charlottetown, don du Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAG H-4538)

Le Pen and Pencil Club a été fondé pour promouvoir les arts et la littérature et favoriser les échanges à caractère social entre les artistes et les écrivains. Sa première réunion a eu lieu le 5 mars 1890 à la résidence du peintre William Hope. Étaient également présents les artistes William Brymner et Robert Harris, les auteurs John Try-Davies et John E. Logan, ainsi que le bibliothécaire de l’Institut Fraser R.W. Boodle9. À la réunion suivante, John Pinhey, l’architecte A.T. Taylor, les professeurs de McGill S.E. Dawson, C.E. Moyse et Paul Lafleur, et l’avocat Norman Rielle étaient aussi du nombre. Le 29 mars, Otto Jacobi et Forbes Torrance avaient rallié le club. Le nombre de membres était limité à trente, tous des hommes. En décembre 1892, le club comptait vingt-sept artistes et écrivains10. Et ces membres ne vivaient pas forcément de leur art : les artistes amateurs étaient admis, comme le financier William Van Horne, l’avocat Kenneth R. Macpherson et l’homme d’affaires Charles Porteous, et des écrivains exerçant la profession d’avocat, de professeur, de médecin ou de courtier. Se réunissant toutes les deux semaines de l’automne au printemps, les membres choisissaient des sujets à interpréter dans des illustrations, en vers ou en prose d’ici la prochaine réunion. Ce métissage des arts a donné lieu à plusieurs publications collaboratives, dont A Semi-detached house and other stories (Montréal, J. Lovell, 1900) de John Try-Davies, illustré par Robert Harris et dédié au club, ainsi qu’Orphans and other poems d’E.B. Brownlow et Verses de John E. Logan, publiés par le club en 1896 et en 1916, respectivement. Il régnait au club une ambiance marquée par l’intelligence, la créativité et la jovialité, comme en témoigne la célébration chaque année, à la dernière rencontre de la saison, du « génie non reconnu ». Par ailleurs, plusieurs membres du club participaient aussi aux activités de l’Institut Fraser, en particulier William McLennan, qui en a été le président de 1898 à 190211.

Dyonnet a assisté à sa première réunion du Pen and Pencil Club le 24 janvier 1891, sa candidature ayant été proposée par William Brymner; elle sera approuvée par vote deux semaines plus tard. Dyonnet jouera un rôle primordial au sein du club pendant les soixante années suivantes. Il en a été élu vice-président en novembre 1894 et président l’année suivante, et il a assumé les fonctions de trésorier de 1903 à 1913, de 1916 à 1937, et de 1940 à 194712. Le groupe s’est réuni dans le studio de l’artiste à l’Institut Fraser de novembre 189413 à novembre 1910, puis dans son studio de la rue De Bleury de 1916 à 1937 et de 1940 à 194714.

La carrière de Dyonnet a été définie par son appartenance à bon nombre de clubs, regroupements d’artistes et cercles artistiques. En plus des nombreux postes qu’il a occupés au sein du Pen and Pencil Club, il a été secrétaire de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada de 1910 à 1947, il a cosigné, avec Hugh Jones, une histoire de l’Académie en 1934, et il était membre du Club des arts de Montréal en 1912. Il se voyait comme un membre d’une vaste communauté, laquelle comprenait les grands noms de l’histoire de l’art canadien. En décembre 1912, il écrivait à E.R. Greig, conservateur du Musée des beaux-arts de Toronto : « J’ai rassemblé des archives sur plus de cent artistes canadiens, du début de l’art au pays à aujourd’hui15. » Les portraits peints les plus célèbres de Dyonnet représentaient d’ailleurs ses collègues, dont Henri Julien, Charles Gill, Henri Fabien, et le sculpteur Thomas Carli16. Mentionnons que Dyonnet a enseigné le dessin à l’école de Montréal du Conseil des arts et manufactures (1892 à 1922), à l’Art Association of Montreal (1901 à 1908), à l’École Polytechnique de Montréal (1907 à 1922), à l’École des beaux-arts de Montréal (1922 à 1924) et à l’École d’architecture de l’Université McGill (1920 à 1936).

À la réunion du Pen and Pencil Club du 21 mars 1896, Maxime Ingres17 « mentionne le projet d’un album de photographies et d’autographes des membres du club, après avoir vu un échantillon du travail de M. Dyonnet18 ». Nous pouvons donc présumer que Dyonnet avait déjà commencé à photographier les membres du club, et que l’acceptation de sa proposition a officialisé le projet.

Les photographies de Dyonnet ont été distribuées aux membres; en 1950, B.K. Sandwell lui écrivait : « Je chéris encore vos photographies des premiers membres du club, et le souvenir des nombreuses agréables soirées passées dans votre studio19. » Une série de vingt-huit portraits anciens de membres du club, montés sur carte et signés par le sujet, se trouve dans les documents du membre fondateur Robert Harris au Musée d’art du Centre de la Confédération à Charlottetown20. Quatre collections d’épreuves anciennes variées, signées ou non, montrant toutes des membres du club et présentant des variations mineures dans la coupe et l’encadrement, se trouvent au Musée McCord, qui possède aussi les archives du Pen and Pencil Club. Or, ces portraits n’accompagnaient pas les documents du club, malgré la résolution du 21 mars 1896 selon laquelle les photographies seraient intégrées à l’album ordinaire du club au lieu de faire l’objet d’un livre distinct. Deux des collections de McCord sont d’origine inconnue, tandis que les deux autres proviennent de descendants de Paul Lafleur et Charles Porteous, membres du club21.

Une sixième collection de photographies signées Dyonnet appartient aux Archives de la Ville de Montréal. L’artiste en avait fait don à la Bibliothèque de la Ville de Montréal avant 195122. Elles ont été transférées aux Archives en 1997. Il s’agit de soixante-dix-sept épreuves en noir et blanc montées dans un album, en plus des négatifs sur verre de tous les portraits23. L’album a été assemblé au début des années 1940, puisque le membre du club Warwick Chipman y est identifié comme l’ambassadeur au Chili, un poste qu’il a occupé de 1942 à 194524. Il s’agit probablement de l’album de « vieux membres et amis du Pen and Pencil Club » que Dyonnet a présenté à la réunion du club du 28 février 1942. La couverture porte une mention à l’encre « Pen and Pencil Club/Portraits des membres », tandis que la mention « PEN AND PENCIL CLUB/PORTRAITS DES MEMBRES/Compilée par Edmond Dyonnet, R.C.A. » est dactylographiée sur une feuille de garde insérée. Le titre est encore une fois trompeur, puisque seules quarante-neuf des soixante-dix-sept photographies montrent des membres du club, les vingt-huit autres représentant d’autres artistes et le Dr Henri Lafleur25. L’identité de la personne qui a assemblé physiquement l’album demeure également obscure. Le nom, la profession et l’appartenance, le cas échéant, à l’Académie royale des arts du Canada de chaque sujet sont indiqués à l’encre. On constate toutefois des erreurs d’épellation26 et des désignations incorrectes de l’appartenance à l’Académie27 qui auraient été inacceptables pour Dyonnet, secrétaire de longue date de l’organisation. L’album ne constitue pas non plus le catalogue exhaustif des photographies de Dyonnet. L’absence du négatif sur verre de certains portraits se trouvant dans d’autres collections porte à croire que dans les années 1940, bon nombre d’entre eux avaient été brisés.

Une collection additionnelle de quatre-vingt-deux portraits montés sur carte et identifiés par une personne inconnue appartenait à un collectionneur de Montréal en 200728. La plupart de ces épreuves sont coupées de manière plus serrée, mettant l’accent sur la tête et la poitrine des sujets. Soixante-dix-huit épreuves de photographies de Dyonnet se trouvent dans l’album du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada.

L’établissement d’une chronologie des photographies de Dyonnet comporte son lot de défis. Tous les portraits du fonds Robert Harris à Charlottetown s’accompagnent d’une date inscrite à la mine de manière moderne. Le catalographe a correctement présumé que les photographies étaient liées au Pen and Pencil Club, puisque les dates renvoient à l’entrée du sujet au club. Puisque certaines de ces dates précèdent le retour de Dyonnet à Montréal en octobre 189029, il ne peut s’agir des dates auxquelles les photographies ont été prises.

Le projet de Dyonnet tournait autour de l’appartenance au club, mais cette orientation n’éclaire pas forcément la date des photographies, puisqu’il n’est pas établi que la réalisation d’un portrait constituait un avantage immédiatement conféré aux nouveaux membres. Certains n’ayant pas été photographiés par Dyonnet, l’exercice était présumément laissé à la discrétion de chacun30. Quelques sujets, membres et non-membres, ont été photographiés deux fois lors de sessions distinctes31. La question de la date d’admission au club n’a donc aucune pertinence pour les non-membres.

Hormis trois exceptions, toutes les photographies semblent avoir été prises dans le studio de Dyonnet. Figure parmi les exceptions le portrait le plus ancien, soit celui d’Otto Jacobi, qui a quitté Montréal pour Toronto en avril 189132. Fait particulier, Jacobi a été immortalisé chez lui33, son épouse pouvant être aperçue par la porte (no 5). En mai 1896, des épreuves ont été envoyées chez Jacobi à Toronto pour qu’il les signe34.

Il y aurait lieu d’associer les portraits en fonction de leur toile de fond. Vingt et un membres du club ont été photographiés devant un paravent en papier, que l’on aperçoit dans l’autoportrait de Dyonnet (fig. 3). Accessoire aisément transportable, l’artiste l’a peut-être également utilisé dans les deux studios qu’il a occupés avant d’emménager à l’Institut Fraser en 1894. Les sujets de ces portraits, ayant été admis dans le club entre 1890 et 1896, forment un groupe homogène, et leur photographie peut avoir été prise entre 1891 et 189635. Quatre artistes non membres, William Cruikshank, Charles Moss, Joseph Saint-Charles et Horatio Walker, ainsi que le Dr Henri Lafleur36, ont également été immortalisés devant le paravent.

Fig. 3. Edmond Dyonnet, Autoportrait, vers 1894, épreuve à la gélatine argentique montée sur carte, 11,4 sur 9,1 cm (carte : 17,6 sur 15 cm). Robert Harris fonds, Musée d’art du Centre de la Confédération, Charlottetown, don du Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAG H1821-k)

Cinquante-six portraits, dont trente-sept montrant des membres du club (y compris trois autoportraits de Dyonnet), ont été pris devant une toile de fond en tissu. Celui-ci était tendu devant une armoire normande en bois de poirier sculpté, que la famille de Dyonnet avait emporté au Canada37, comme le montre le négatif sur verre du portrait de John Hammond (fig. 4). L’impressionnante armoire trône en arrière-plan du portrait du membre du club R.J. Wickenden (no 18) et de celui de trois non-membres, Joseph Franchère (no 23), R.G. Mathews (no 4) et Edmund Morris (no 21). Tous les sujets ont été immortalisés assis, sauf Frank Houghton, J.W. Morrice38 et Dyonnet dans son autoportrait de 1910 (no 54). F.W. Hutchison, qui a occupé un studio à l’Institut Fraser dès juin 190239, est photographié devant un tissu à motif paisley (fig. 5).

Fig. 4. Edmond Dyonnet, John Hammond, vers 1904-1910, épreuve positive tirée d’un négatif sur verre, 16,4 sur 12 cm. Fonds Edmond Dyonnet, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_1P027)

Fig. 5. Edmond Dyonnet, F.W. Hutchison, vers 1902, épreuve en noir et blanc sur papier mat avec bordures blanches, 12,3 sur 9,6 cm (image : 11,6 sur 8,9 cm). Fonds Pen and Pencil Club, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P036)

Les membres photographiés devant le tissu tendu sont entrés dans le club entre 1892 et 1913. Ici aussi, la date d’admission ne concorde pas forcément avec la date de la prise des photographies. En 1891, Dyonnet a peint un portrait d’Henri Julien, ancien professeur au Conseil des arts et manufactures, admis au club le 26 janvier 189240 (fig. 6). La photographie qu’a prise Dyonnet de Julien (fig. 7) date manifestement de bien des années plus tard. Par ailleurs, une photographie, datée sur le négatif du 20 mai 190041 (fig. 8), du compositeur et organiste Guillaume Couture, membre du club du 8 octobre 1892 au 13 janvier 1894, montre un homme considérablement plus jeune que celui qu’on voit sur le portrait réalisé par Dyonnet42 (fig. 9). Archibald Browne n’a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club qu’en 1923; or, l’étude d’une photographie de Browne prise en 1919 révèle que celle de Dyonnet (no 33) date d’avant 192343.

Fig. 6. Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Julien, 1890, huile sur panneau dur, 35,2 sur 26,5 cm. Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario, Toronto, don anonyme, 1987 (87/203). Photo : © MBAO

Fig. 7. Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Julien, vers 1906, épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm). Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, Ottawa (no 31 de l’album, p. 13, recto). Photo : MBAC

Fig. 8. Photographe inconnu, Guillaume Couture, 20 mai 1900. 1 photographie : épreuve n&b, 25 x 20 cm. Archives, Université de Montréal, Fonds Guillaume Couture, P0014/F,0005

Fig. 9. Edmond Dyonnet, Guillaume Couture, vers 1910, épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm. Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, Ottawa (no 83 de l’album, p. 26, verso). Photo : MBAC

Hormis le Dr Henri Lafleur, les sujets de Dyonnet qui n’étaient pas membres du Pen and Pencil Club étaient tous des artistes, et non des écrivains. Ils côtoyaient Dyonnet par l’intermédiaire du Conseil des arts et manufactures, de l’Institut Fraser ou de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada. Parmi ses collègues des écoles de Montréal et de Québec du Conseil, notons Charles Huot, Joseph Franchère, Charles Gill, Louis-Philippe Hébert (nos 28, 23, 26 et 32) et Joseph Saint-Charles44. Figuraient parmi ses anciens élèves aux écoles du Conseil Henri Fabien, A.Y. Jackson, Edward Boyd et Dominique Rosaire (nos 57, 14, 55 et 9). F.W. Hutchison, qui a été mentionné plus tôt, ainsi qu’Alphonse Jongers, demi-frère de Maxime Ingres, C.J. Way (nos 16 et 20) et Henri Beau ont tous loué des locaux à l’Institut Fraser45. James Smith a précédé Dyonnet comme secrétaire de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada (no 58), tandis que d’autres membres de l’Académie établis à Toronto ou à Ottawa venaient à Montréal pour assister à des vernissages et à des réunions du conseil.

Outre à la lumière d’une comparaison avec des photographies datées avec plus de certitude des mêmes sujets, une datation plus précise des portraits de Dyonnet peut êtrea proposée en fonction des allées et venues des sujets à Montréal. Henri Fabien (no 57) portait une barbe sur sa carte d’exposant de l’Exposition universelle de Paris de 1900, mais l’avait rasée peu après son retour à Montréal en 190246. Charles Moss (fig. 10) a été directeur de l’École d’art d’Ottawa de 1883 à 1888, après quoi il s’est établi à Orange, au New Jersey. De 1892 à 1900, il est toutefois revenu chaque automne pour donner un cours d’aquarelle de six semaines à l’Art Association of Montreal47. Il a assisté à une réunion du Pen and Pencil Club le 17 octobre 1896. William St. Thomas Smith (no 27) faisait l’objet d’une exposition individuelle à l’Art Association of Montreal en novembre 1904. Le 26 novembre, il a participé à une réunion du club en tant qu’invité.

Fig. 10. M.O. Hammond, copie du portrait de Charles Moss fait par Edmond Dyonnet, vers 1896, image numérisée positive tirée du négatif. Fonds M.O. Hammond, Archives publiques de l’Ontario, Toronto (F 1075-12-0-0-56)

Dyonnet a aussi photographié ses compagnons de peinture. William Cruikshank (no 2) a travaillé pour la première fois dans le bas du fleuve Saint-Laurent en 189548. À l’été 1897, Edmund Morris, Cruikshank, Dyonnet et Maurice Cullen ont tous peint à Beaupré, traversant à l’île d’Orléans pour rendre visite à Horatio Walker49 (fig. 11). À Beaupré, Dyonnet a photographié Cullen et lui-même peignant sur des toiles supportées par un chevalet rabattable qu’il avait lui-même conçu50 (fig. 12 et no 49). Entre 1898 et 1903, avec l’aide de Charles Porteous, il tentera de le breveter et de le commercialiser en tant que chevalet Corot (fig. 13)51.

Fig. 11. Edmond Dyonnet, Horatio Walker, vers 1895-1897, épreuve en noir et blanc sur papier mat avec bordures blanches, 12,3 sur 9,6 cm (image : 11,6 sur 8,9 cm). Fonds Pen and Pencil Club, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P070)

Fig. 12. Edmond Dyonnet, Autoportrait à Beaupré, 1897, épreuve à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,7 sur 8,3 cm. Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, Ottawa (no 53 de l’album, p. 19, recto). Photo : MBAC

Les photographies de Dyonnet ont circulé de nombreuses manières du vivant de l’artiste, sans qu’il soit identifié comme leur auteur. Des détails de ses portraits d’Alphonse Jongers (no 16), de Robert Harris (no 6) et de William Brymner (fig. 19), ainsi que de son autoportrait (fig. 3) ont été gravés pour l’article « Some Representative Canadian Sculptors and Painters », qui a paru dans le Daily Witness de Montréal du 2 avril 1898. Un détail du portrait de Joseph Franchère accompagnait par ailleurs l’article de M.J. Mount sur Franchère dans The Canadian Century en juillet 191052. Dyonnet a accompagné son propre article, « L’art chez les Canadiens-Français », paru dans The Year Book of Canadian Art 1913, de détails de ses photographies de Clarence Gagnon, Louis-Philippe Hébert, Henri Julien et Charles Huot53. Albert Laberge a quant à lui reproduit les photographies qu’a prises Dyonnet d’Henri Beau, Maurice Cullen et Arthur Rosaire dans Peintres et écrivains d’hier et d’aujourd’hui54 et celle de Joseph Franchère dans Journalistes, écrivains et artistes55.

Fig. 13. Edmond Dyonnet, Chevalet Corot, vers 1898, épreuve à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé montée sur carte, 12 sur 9,4 cm (carte : 18,5 sur 11,8 cm). Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, Ottawa. Photo : MBAC

À deux reprises, les portraits de Dyonnet ont servi de base aux œuvres d’art de ses collègues, avec son consentement. En 1905, le Pen and Pencil Club a amassé des dons pour réaliser un buste de feu William McLennan, qui serait donné à l’Institut Fraser et à la bibliothèque de McGill, deux établissements avec lesquels McLennan entretenait des liens étroits56. Le sculpteur, Louis-Philippe Hébert, s’est fondé sur une photographie de Dyonnet (figs. 14 et 15). En 1922, G. Horne Russell, alors président de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada, a peint un portrait de Dyonnet, qui était secrétaire de l’organisation, d’après l’un des autoportraits de ce dernier (figs. 16 et 17).

Fig. 14. Edmond Dyonnet, William McLennan, vers 1891-1896, épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 11,5 sur 9,1 cm. Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, Ottawa (no 66 de l’album, p. 22, recto). Photo : MBAC

Fig. 15. Louis-Philippe Hébert, William McLennan, 1905, bronze, 56,8 sur 52,1 sur 31,3 cm. Collection d’arts visuels, Université McGill, Montréal (1975-018). Photo : MBAC

Fig. 16. Edmond Dyonnet, Autoportrait, 1912, épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,2 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm). Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux‑arts du Canada, Ottawa (no 11 de l’album, p. 3, recto). Photo : MBAC

Fig. 17. G. Horne Russell, Edmond Dyonnet, 1922, huile sur toile, 79,3 sur 64 cm. Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, Ottawa, don de Gabrielle Lorin, Saint-Laurent, Québec, 1974 (17947). Photo : MBAC

Dyonnet n’était pas le seul à immortaliser les grands noms de l’art au Canada. Journaliste, rédacteur et critique d’art pour le Globe de Toronto, M.O. Hammond (1876 – 1934) était un membre actif de nombreux cercles artistiques et littéraires. Il a photographié régulièrement des membres du Arts and Letters Club, du Canadian Art Club et d’autres organisations pendant vingt-cinq ans, présentant ses œuvres au sein de plusieurs clubs de photographie. À l’automne 1927, il a rassemblé une série de portraits d’artistes canadiens, qu’il a vendus au Musée des beaux-arts de Toronto, à la Bibliothèque publique de Toronto, au Musée des beaux-arts du Canada et au gouvernement du Québec57. Il a par la suite réalisé des portraits d’artistes décédés qu’il avait, par la force des choses, copiés sur des photographies, des gravures, des dessins ou des peintures à l’huile signés par d’autres. Dyonnet, dont les activités à l’Académie l’ont conduit à Toronto deux fois en 1926, a été photographié par Hammond avec Maurice Cullen et G. Horne Russell (no 45). Hammond a dû acquérir des épreuves auprès de Dyonnet pour sa deuxième série, qu’il a présentée en décembre 192758. Cette série comportait dix-neuf portraits fondés sur des détails de photographies prises par Dyonnet. Hammond a par la suite présenté des copies des portraits qu’avait faits Dyonnet de Charles Gill et John Pinhey59 et reproduit un détail de son portrait de Louis-Philippe Hébert dans son ouvrage Painting and Sculpture in Canada60. Les photographies qu’avait prises Dyonnet de Charles Moss et de Joseph Saint-Charles ne sont d’ailleurs connues que grâce aux copies de Hammond61 (fig. 10).

En plus de l’enseignement, Dyonnet gagnait sa vie comme peintre portraitiste et, bien qu’il ait à la fois peint et photographié ses collègues Henri Julien, Charles Gill, Henri Fabien et John Hammond, ainsi que les membres du club Maxime Ingres, William Herrick, Charles Porteous, Paul Lafleur et J.T.W. Burgess62, il ne se servait pas de ses photographies comme études pour ses peintures. Il considérait ses photographies comme un projet distinct. Il semble cependant que celui-ci lui ait causé des soucis. Thomas Garside a en effet raconté au biographe de Dyonnet, Jean Ménard, que des rumeurs couraient selon lesquelles Dyonnet s’inspirait de ses photographies pour peindre ses portraits; craignant que sa réputation en prenne un coup, l’artiste aurait détruit son appareil-photo63. Cette histoire n’est pas entièrement véridique, puisqu’en 1920, Dyonnet a dit au membre du club Percy Nobbs que « l’album photographique des membres du club n’est plus tenu à jour. Dyonnet déclare avoir été présenté comme un photographe professionnel, ce à quoi il s’oppose apparemment farouchement. Il prêtera cependant volontiers son appareil-photo à quiconque voudrait entretenir la collection64. »

Dyonnet a abandonné le portrait photographique en 1913. Il y a peut-être été incité par son déménagement forcé de l’Institut Fraser au début de 1914 en raison de rénovations majeures65. W.H. Clapp, qui a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club en avril 1913, semble avoir été le dernier membre photographié dans l’ancien studio de Dyonnet66 (no 8). Il n’existe aucune photographie de membres admis par la suite. Il est cependant possible que J.W. Beatty ait été photographié au mois de novembre suivant, alors qu’il a assisté à des réunions du conseil de l’Académie à Montréal67.

Une photo a été prise en 1915. A.Y. Jackson s’était rendu à Montréal depuis Toronto en décembre 1914, pour suivre le déroulement de la guerre qui avait éclaté en septembre. En juin 1915, après la bataille de Saint-Julien, il s’enrôle. Il partira pour l’Angleterre en automne68. Jackson, un ancien étudiant de Dyonnet, était promis à une carrière brillante. Si Dyonnet a voulu l’immortaliser en uniforme, c’est probablement par respect pour sa décision d’aller au front et parce qu’il savait que son avenir était compromis (no 14). Dans les documents de Jackson se trouve la seule grande épreuve sur papier connue d’une photographie de Dyonnet69.

Les portraits réalisés par Dyonnet constituent la majeure partie de l’album du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, mais il contient aussi d’autres photographies associées à l’artiste. En 1910, ce dernier a été photographié avec E. Rimbault Dibdin, conservateur de la galerie Walker à Liverpool (no 52), alors qu’il accompagnait l’exposition sur l’art canadien organisée par l’Académie royale des arts du Canada pour le Festival of Empire à Londres. Le festival ayant été annulé en raison du décès du roi Édouard VII, Dyonnet a organisé la tenue de l’exposition à Liverpool70. Un portrait informel de William Brymner, possiblement pris dans le studio de Dyonnet (fig. 18), peut également être attribuable à ce dernier, puisque Brymner porte les mêmes costume, chemise et cravate que sur son portrait du Pen and Pencil Club (fig. 19). Sur une autre photographie qu’a prise Dyonnet de Brymner (collection privée), ce dernier a en main la tanagra romaine que l’on voit sur la tablette derrière lui dans le portrait en studio. Ovid Gould, dont l’instantané le montre qui dessine à l’extérieur (no 56), a assisté à un atelier de modèle vivant à l’Académie avec Dyonnet en 189871, et ce dernier a exposé un portrait d’Ovid Gould en 190172.

Fig. 18. Attribuée à Edmond Dyonnet, William Brymner dans un studio, vers 1891‑1896, épreuve à la gélatine 
argentique sur papier mat sans bordures, 12,0 sur 9,8 cm. 
Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du 
Canada, Ottawa (no 50 de l’album, p. 18, recto). 
Photo : MBAC

Fig. 19. Edmond Dyonnet, William Brymner, vers 1891-1896, procédé à l’albumine, sels d’argent, 11,3 sur 8 cm. Musée McCord, Montréal, don de Mme Paul F. Sise (MP‑0000-2569.2). Photo : © Musée McCord

Les photographies attribuables à Dyonnet dans l’album du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada sont des épreuves virées sur papier mat dotées de bordures fines, qui se présentent en deux tailles, soit approximativement 15,2 cm sur 10,9 cm et 10,4 cm sur 7,8 cm. Les épreuves sur papier mat ont probablement été imprimées commercialement, mais un certain nombre d’épreuves virées sur papier glacé de dimensions variables et sans bordures ont peut-être été imprimées par Dyonnet lui-même. Les portraits d’artistes sont généralement mats et placés au début de l’album, tandis que ceux des membres non-artistes du Pen and Pencil Club sont souvent glacés et disposés au milieu de l’album. Si l’on ignore où Dyonnet a appris la photographie et quels types d’appareils-photo il utilisait, l’artiste produisait néanmoins des portraits d’une qualité remarquable, qui témoignait de sa capacité, en tant que peintre portraitiste, à capter l’éloquent langage corporel de ses sujets : l’assurance de William Brymner (fig. 19), la vanité excentrique d’Horatio Walker (fig. 11), la flamboyance spectaculaire du Dr Burgess, psychiatre à l’hôpital psychiatrique de Verdun (no 67), et la timidité (ou la mauvaise santé) d’Arthur Rosaire (no 9).

La personne qui a assemblé l’album a ajouté d’autres photographies d’artistes, mais aucune d’écrivains. Quinze ont été imprimées commercialement en noir et blanc. Il y a aussi une épreuve ancienne virée montrant R.F. Gagen, faite par M.O. Hammond (no 7). Ce sont de plus petites épreuves que celles que Hammond avait présentées à la fin des années 1920; elles comprennent ses copies de l’autoportrait peint par John Bell-Smith en 1853 (no 102), de la photo de William Notman du comité d’accrochage de la première exposition de l’Académie des arts du Canada en 1880 (no 103) et d’une photographie ancienne de Tom Thomson (no 98). Parmi les portraits réalisés par Hammond lui-même73, notons la photographie de groupe de Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen et G. Horne Russell prise en 1926 (no 45).

Fait exceptionnel, l’album contient aussi une photographie en noir et blanc sur papier glacé, signée par Suzor-Coté, prise par un photographe de rue à Miami dans les années 1930, ainsi qu’une photographie d’un article publié s’accompagnant d’une photographie de Suzor-Coté74 (nos 87 et 89), et une photographie d’un portrait de 1937 réalisé par Kenneth Forbes (no 108).

Quelques épreuves du dix-neuvième siècle présentent un plus grand intérêt. Il s’agit notamment d’un portrait de l’artiste J.C. Miles, de Saint John au Nouveau-Brunswick (no 3), d’un portrait de William Brymner, qui pose assis devant son chevalet (no 51), d’une photo prise en 1871 par William Notman de William Fraser (no 48), de la photo de groupe mentionnée plus tôt de Harris, Jacobi et Brymner (no 106), et de deux photographies isolées de femmes artistes : un instantané de Claire Fauteux qui joue au golf (no 46) et un portrait en studio de la peintre montréalaise Margaret Houghton, qui tient une palette (no 47). « Sweet looking at our still life » (no 109) est inscrit à la mine sur la page de l’album, sous une photographie montrant le concierge de l’Art Association of Montreal avec une nature morte d’Ulric Lamarche présentée à l’exposition du printemps de 189775.

Outre l’album dont il est question ici, la Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada possède des photographies de Dyonnet montées sur carte, dont une est collée au verso d’une invitation imprimée pour l’exposition 1918 de l’ARC76. Bien que leur provenance demeure inconnue, elles accompagnaient probablement l’album. Parmi ces images, on retrouve les photographies qu’a prises Dyonnet de cinq de ses peintures77, des copies montées de ses photographies de Robert Harris, Maurice Cullen et Homer Watson, identifiés sur la carte par une main inconnue, un double de l’instantané d’Ovid Gould, des épreuves non montées de ses photographies de J.W. Beatty, Percy Nobbs, Archibald Browne et Curtis Williamson, et deux photographies montées du chevalet Corot, rabattu et ouvert (voir fig. 13).

La prédominance des sujets montréalais dans l’album, et l’erreur d’identification d’un portrait de Fred Haines, artiste prééminent de Toronto78 (no 107), portent à croire que la personne qui a assemblé l’album avait un intérêt particulier pour Montréal. Parmi les personnes qui répondraient à ces critères, et qui auraient pu ajouter des éléments à un album existant d’épreuves de Dyonnet, notons Thomas Roche Lee (1915 – 1977). Rédacteur au Ingersoll Tribune en 1949, puis maire de Baie-D’Urfé dans l’ouest de l’île de Montréal de 1957 à 196179, Lee a écrit sur Albert Robinson et Daniel Fowler80, et il se définissait comme un « collectionneur d’ouvrages sur la peinture et les peintres canadiens81. » Il s’intéressait à bon nombre de sujets, et le Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario, le Musée des beaux-arts du Canada et le Musée McCord possèdent tous des objets qui lui ont appartenu. Lee a été un proche ami de Dyonnet durant les dernières années de la vie de l’artiste; en 1953, il a fait retaper et miméographier en cent exemplaires le manuscrit dactylographié des mémoires de Dyonnet en anglais82. La collection Thomas Roche Lee dans la Bibliothèque de recherche et archives Edward P. Taylor du Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario83 comporte l’ode de Warwick Chipman à Dyonnet, « On the Fortieth Anniversary of his Election to the Pen and Pencil Club », et trente lettres adressées à Dyonnet, ce qui laisse entendre que Lee avait accès à la succession de ce dernier. Lee partageait l’antipathie de Dyonnet pour le modernisme, et l’album d’Ottawa comporte des portraits d’autres fervents conservateurs, comme Kenneth Forbes84 et John Radford de Vancouver (nos 10 et 104). Étant donné la prédominance d’œuvres attribuables à Dyonnet ou liées à lui dans l’album d’Ottawa, il y a lieu de l’associer à l’artiste, et par le fait même, à Lee85.

Je remercie Kathleen MacKinnon, registraire au Musée d’art du Centre de la Confédération, Heather McNabb, archiviste de référence au Musée McCord, Agnieszka Prycik des Archives de la Ville de Montréal et Philip Dombowsky de la Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada pour leur aide dans la préparation de cet article.

Notes

1 Les sujets de toutes les photographies sont identifiés sous celles-ci sur la page de l’album. Les photographies de J.W. Morrice, F.W. Hutchison, Clarence Gagnon, William Brymner et A.Y. Jackson en ont été retirées, vraisemblablement avant que le Musée des beaux-arts n’acquière l’album.

2 « Un artiste canadien », La Minerve, 28 octobre 1890, p. 11. Louis Fréchette, « À propos de peinture », Le Canada artistique, vol. I, no 1, novembre 1890, p. 181 et note à la p. 180. Voir aussi Edmond Dyonnet, Memoirs of a Canadian Artist [miméographie], Montréal, 1951 et Edmond Dyonnet, Mémoires d’un artiste canadien, Ottawa, Éditions de l’Université d’Ottawa, 1968.

3 Dyonnet, Memoirs, op. cit., p. 30 et Dyonnet, Mémoires, op. cit., p. 43. Selon le catalogue de l’exposition du printemps 1892 de l’Art Association of Montreal (inaugurée le 18 avril 1892), l’adresse de Dyonnet est le 1000, rue Dorchester. Sur Maxime Ingres, voir Robert H. Michel, « “Easy, Debonair and Brisk”: Maxime Ingres at McGill », Fontanus, vol. XIII, 2013, p. 131 à 134.

4 Selon l’annuaire Lovell de Montréal (http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna.lovell) de 1894-1895 (révisé le 25 juin 1894), l’« Ingres-Coutellier School of Languages » est établie au 9, rue University. Dans l’annuaire Lovell de 1895-1896, l’adresse de Dyonnet est également le 9, rue University. Voir la note 13.

5 Voir Edgar C. Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library: An Informal History, Londres, Clive Bingley, 1977, p. 36 à 64. Dans le répertoire alphabétique de l’annuaire Lovell de Montréal pour 1895, le « Fraser Institute » est répertorié au 811, rue Dorchester, l’entrée de la bibliothèque se trouvant sur Dorchester, et les locaux loués, au 9, rue University.

6 Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library, op. cit., p. 76 et 83.

7 Robert Harris, Montréal, à sa mère, Charlottetown, 30 septembre 1888. Fonds Robert Harris, Musée d’art du Centre de la Confédération, don du Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAGH-4372). Dans l’annuaire Lovell de Montréal pour 1890-1891 (révisé le 23 juin 1890), Harris et Jacobi sont recensés à l’Institut Fraser, au 9, rue University.

8 Robert Harris, Montréal, à sa mère, Charlottetown, 19 octobre 1890, Fonds Robert Harris, Musée d’art du Centre de la Confédération, don du Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAGH-4538), traduction libre.

9 Toutes les références aux réunions du Pen and Pencil Club sont fondées sur leurs procès-verbaux, qui se trouvent dans le fonds du Pen and Pencil Club au Musée McCord de Montréal (P139). Les procès-verbaux des réunions, les listes de membres, des spicilèges et des lettres peuvent être consultés en ligne sur collections.musee-mccord.qc.ca. Boodle a été bibliothécaire à l’Institut Fraser jusqu’à la fin de 1890. Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library, op. cit., p. 78.

10 Pour connaître l’histoire du Pen and Pencil Club, voir Leonard Cox, « Fifty Years of Brush and Pen: A Historical Sketch of the Pen and Pencil Club of Montreal », Queen’s Quarterly, vol. 46, no 3, automne 1939, p. 341 à 347, ainsi que Leo Cox et J. Harry Smith, The Pen & Pencil Club 1890–1959, Montréal, The Pen and Pencil Club, 1959. Cette dernière publication recense les dates d’admission des membres, mais non celles de leur retrait. Un certain nombre de membres ont abandonné le club dans ses deux premières années d’existence. William Raphael a fait partie du club du 17 mars 1890 au 19 décembre 1891, Otto Jacobi du 17 mars 1890 au 18 avril 1891, J.C. Pinhey du 17 mars 1890 au 19 décembre 1891, A.T. Taylor du 17 mars au 13 décembre 1890, Munsey Seymour du 10 janvier au 19 décembre 1891, le Dr W.H. Drummond du 30 janvier au 22 mars 1892, et Joseph Gould du 12 mars au 22 octobre 1892.

11 Les membres du Pen and Pencil Club Maxime Ingres et Leigh Gregor ont siégé au comité de direction de l’Institut Fraser de 1898 à 1900 et de 1908 à 1912, respectivement. Eugène Lafleur, le frère de Paul Lafleur, y a œuvré de 1894 à 1930. Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library, op. cit., p. 211 et 212. Sur les recoupements entre les membres de ces diverses organisations, voir Hélène Sicotte, « William Brymner: A Remarkably Social Man », dans William Brymner: Artist, Teacher, Colleague, Kingston, Agnes Etherington Art Centre, 2010, p. 23 à 33.

12 Voir les procès-verbaux des réunions du Pen and Pencil Club des 24 octobre 1913, 1er novembre 1913, 21 octobre 1916, 30 octobre 1937, 26 octobre 1940 et 6 novembre 1948, où il est indiqué que Percy May est trésorier pour une deuxième année.

13 Procès-verbal de la réunion du Pen and Pencil Club du 10 novembre 1894. C’est la première mention du studio de Dyonnet à l’Institut Fraser.

14 Leo Cox, « Fifty Years of Brush and Pen », The Pen & Pencil Club 1890–1959, Montréal, janvier 1959. Le club s’est réuni dans le studio de Dyonnet à l’Institut Fraser du 27 octobre 1894 jusqu’en novembre 1910, après quoi le studio d’Alberta Cleland, également à l’Institut, a accueilli le groupe. Ses réunions ont ensuite été tenues au studio de Kenneth Macpherson, situé au 255, rue De Bleury, du 4 mai 1911 au 29 avril 1916 (Macpherson étant décédé le 26 avril 1916). L’automne suivant, Dyonnet a repris le studio de Macpherson, et le groupe a continué de s’y réunir jusqu’à l’automne 1937. Voir aussi les procès-verbaux des réunions du 26 octobre 1940 et du 3 mai 1947.

15 Edmond Dyonnet, Montréal à E.R. Greig, Toronto, 30 décembre 1912, Bibliothèque de recherche et archives Edward P. Taylor, Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario (A3.9.6 Art Museum of Toronto Letters 1912–1920, boîte 4 – Royal Canadian Academy of Arts), traduction libre. L’artiste Edmund Morris partageait l’intérêt de son collègue pour les débuts de l’art canadien. En janvier 1911, il a organisé l’exposition Paintings by Deceased Canadian Artists au Musée des beaux-arts de Toronto. Dyonnet a corrigé les erreurs de Morris dans les dates relatives à Paul Peel et Allan Edson. Voir Dyonnet, Montréal à Morris, Toronto, 30 janvier 1911 (collection Edgar J. Stone, Bibliothèque de recherche et archives Edward P. Taylor, Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario).

16 Le Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec possède des portraits d’Henri Julien (49.65) et de Charles Gill (1938.15) signés Dyonnet, le Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario des portraits de Julien (87/203) et d’Henri Fabien (69/30), le Musée des beaux-arts du Canada un portrait de Fabien (28119), et le Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal celui de Thomas Carli (1943.778).

17 La candidature de Maxime Ingres avait été proposée au Pen and Pencil Club par Dyonnet et William Brymner le 16 janvier 1892.

18 Procès-verbal du Pen and Pencil Club, réunion du 21 mars 1896, traduction libre.

19 B.K. Sandwell, Toronto à Edmond Dyonnet, Montréal, le 17 juin 1950, fonds Edmond Dyonnet (P9/1/3), Centre de recherche en civilisation canadienne-française, Université d’Ottawa.

20 Numéros d’acquisition CAG H-1821 a–zz et CAG H-225. Don du Robert Harris Trust, 1965. Les sujets ont fait leur entrée dans le club entre 1890 et 1900.

21 La provenance des albums MP-1978.129.1 à 26 (26 portraits) et MP-1980.197.1 à 40 (40 portraits) de McCord est inconnue. MP-1992.1 à 23 (23 portraits) provient de la succession de Mme A. (Adolphe) Lomer, sœur du membre du club Paul T. Lafleur et mère de Gerhard Lomer, bibliothécaire en chef de McGill de 1920 à 1948. MP-0000-2569.1 à 21 (21 portraits) est un don de Mme Paul F. Sise, fille du membre du club Charles Porteous.

22 Léo-Paul Desrosiers, conservateur, Bibliothèque, Ville de Montréal à E. Dyonnet, Montréal, 20 septembre 1951. Desrosiers accuse réception d’un exemplaire dactylographié des mémoires de Dyonnet et écrit : « Nous avons d’ailleurs, à la Bibliothèque, une belle collection que vous nous avez donnée » (fonds Edmond Dyonnet, P9/1/3–23). Le fonds Edmond Dyonnet de l’Université d’Ottawa comporte une photocopie de l’album des Archives, en plus de photos originales montées sur carte.

23 Les négatifs sur verre ont deux tailles, soit environ 12,5 sur 10 cm et 16,5 sur 12 cm, mais les dimensions ne sont pas constantes. Il ne semble pas y avoir de lien entre les dimensions et la date des portraits.

24 Voir le site Web d’Affaires mondiales Canada, à https://w05.international.gc.ca/HeadsOfPost/SearchHP-Recherche
CM.aspx?lang=fra. Voir aussi le procès-verbal des réunions du club du 28 février et du 28 novembre 1942.

25 Le Dr Henri Lafleur était le frère du célèbre membre du club Paul T. Lafleur. Les deux ont enseigné à l’Université McGill. Pour en savoir plus sur la famille Lafleur, voir Madeleine Landry, Beaupré 1896–1904 : Lieu d’inspiration d’une peinture identitaire, Québec, Septentrion, 2014, p. 40 à 43.

26 Gustave Hahn (pour Gustav), Alphonse Jougers (pour Jongers), MacPhail (pour Macphail), MacPherson (pour Macpherson), G.R. Matthews (pour R.G. Mathews), A. Dickson Paterson (pour Patterson), E. Horne Russell (pour G. Horne Russell), W. Lt. Thomas Smith (pour St. Thomas Smith), Dr. R. Tait-McKenzie (pour R. Tait McKenzie) et J.C. Way (pour C.J. Way).

27 Une personne était d’abord nommée, à la suite d’une élection, membre associé (A.R.C.A.) et pouvait ensuite recevoir le titre de membre en règle (R.C.A.) quand l’un des quarante postes était vacant. Edmund Morris est identifié comme R.C.A., alors qu’il avait seulement été élu A.R.C.A. en 1898. A.D. Rosaire, également désigné comme R.C.A., avait été élu A.R.C.A. en 1914, et W. St. Thomas Smith avait reçu le titre de A.R.C.A. en 1902. L’identification d’une photographie du doyen Walton de la Faculté de droit de McGill est reprise sous l’un des deux portraits de Homer Watson, qui est identifié comme « Homer Watson, R.C.A. professeur au McGill Univ. ».

28 Nous n’en avons vu que les copies numérisées. Chaque épreuve est montée sur carte et son sujet est identifié à la main, en caractères d’imprimerie, par une personne inconnue.

29 William Brymner, Robert Harris, William Hope, John Logan, John Try Davies, Paul Lafleur, William McLennan, John Pinhey, Norman Rielle, Forbes Torrance et Otto Jacobi.

30 Les membres suivants, admis entre 1890 et 1914, n’ont pas été photographiés (certains ont seulement fait partie du club brièvement) : R.W. Boodle, E.B. Brownlow, E. Colonna, S.E. Dawson, Louis Fréchette, le doyen Moyse, William Raphael, A.T. Taylor, Percy Woodcock, William Van Horne, Ivan Wotherspoon, Munsey Seymour, l’archidiacre F.G. Scott, le Dr W.H. Drummond, Joseph Gould, le professeur John Cox, F.C.V. Ede, J. McD. Oxley, A.J. Glazebrook, J.B. Hance, E.W. Thompson, B.K. Sandwell, Charles J. Saxe, James McLennan, Albert H. Robinson, J.E. Hoare, J.B. Fitzmaurice, le professeur F.E. Lloyd, A. Campbell Geddes, le professeur René De Roure et le juge E.F. Surveyer.

31 Il s’agit des membres William Brymner, Warwick Chipman, Maurice Cullen, Alphonse Jongers, Paul Lafleur, K.R. Macpherson, Percy Nobbs et Charles Porteous, et des non-membres Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté, Homer Watson et Curtis Williamson. Il y a cinq autoportraits de Dyonnet. Voir les figures 3 et 12 et les numéros 11, 54 et 69.

32 Otto Jacobi, Toronto à J. Try Davies, Montréal, 15 avril 1891 (spicilège I du Pen and Pencil Club, p. 229).

33 Dans l’annuaire Lovell de Montréal pour 1890-1891 (révisé le 23 juin 1890), Jacobi est recensé comme « artist, Fraser Institute, 9 University, h. 2441 St. Catherine ».

34 O.R. Jacobi, Summerhill Ave., Toronto North à Paul T. Lafleur, Montréal, 15 mai 1896 (documents du Pen & Pencil Club, correspondance, boîte 1). Au verso de la carte qui porte sa photographie au Musée d’art du Centre de la Confédération (CAG H-1821zz), Jacobi a écrit (traduction libre) : « Otto Reinhold Jacobi, né le 27 février 1812, maintenant âgé de 84 ans. Je suis né à Königsberg en Prusse orientale. J’ai commencé très tôt à peindre, et j’ai fréquenté l’académie royale d’art locale. À 15 ans, j’ai été engagé pour un an comme enseignant à l’institut pour les sourds et les muets en échange d’un bon salaire. J’ai si bien fait qu’on m’a promis d’augmenter mon salaire si j’acceptais de rester, mais j’avais de plus grandes ambitions. Je suis entré à l’Académie à Berlin, grâce à d’excellentes lettres d’introduction des amis de feu mon père, qui était un franc-maçon d’un certain mérite. J’y ai étudié pendant deux ans; à la troisième année, j’ai participé à un concours d’admission à l’Académie de Düsseldorf; nous étions une douzaine de concurrents. Chacun devait peindre dans la galerie un paysage à l’huile, un portrait grandeur nature et une œuvre libre à l’huile, en plus de plusieurs autres choses. J’ai remporté le grand prix, soit mille dollars, en 1832. Je suis donc allé à Düsseldorf, où j’ai côtoyé nos meilleurs artistes pendant neuf ans. On m’a ensuite recommandé au duc de Nassau, qui m’a nommé professeur et peintre de la cour. Je suis resté à Wiesbaden jusqu’à ce que je sois invité en 1860 à peindre, en l’honneur de la visite du Prince de Galles, les chutes de Shawinigan à Trois Rivières. »

35 Les sujets suivants (la date de leur admission au club figurant entre parenthèses) ont été photographiés devant le paravent : Edward Arthy (17 décembre 1892 – no 80), William Brymner (5 mars 1890 – fig. 19), le Dr T.W. Burgess (25 novembre 1894 – no 67), Maurice Cullen (14 novembre 1896 – no 36), Edmond Dyonnet (17 février 1891 – fig. 3), Robert Harris (5 mars 1890 – no 6) William Hope (5 mars 1890 – no 37), Max Ingres (30 janvier 1892 – no 90), Alphonse Jongers (31 octobre 1896 – no 16), Paul Lafleur (17 mars 1890 – no 61), John E. Logan (5 mars 1890 – no 60), William McLennan (17 mars 1890 – no 66), K.R. Macpherson (16 janvier 1892 – no 74), George Murray (11 janvier 1896 – no 63), John O’Flaherty (11 janvier 1896 – no 81), John C. Pinhey (17 mars 1890 – no 13), C.E.L. Porteous (19 novembre 1892 – no 85), Norman T. Rielle (17 mars 1890 – no 65), Forbes Torrance (17 mars 1890 – no 71), W. Townsend (3 mars 1895 – no 91), John Try-
Davies (5 mars 1890 – no 59).

36 Cruikshank (no 2), Moss (fig. 10) et Walker (fig. 11). La photographie du Dr Henri Lafleur fait partie du fonds Pen and Pencil Club, conservé aux Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P043). Une copie de la photographie prise par Dyonnet de Joseph Saint-Charles se trouve dans le fonds M.O. Hammond, Archives publiques de l’Ontario, F1075-12-0-0-60.

37 Sur l’armoire, voir Jean Chauvin, « Edmond Dyonnet », Ateliers, Montréal et New York, Louis Carrier, 1928, p. 193; J. Harry Smith, « Dyonnet & Canadian Art », Saturday Night, 18 septembre 1948, p. 20. Dyonnet pourrait en avoir hérité à la suite de la mort de son père en 1900. Voir Dyonnet à Charles Porteous, 6 mars 1900 (fonds Porteous, Bibliothèque et Archives Canada) et le procès-verbal de la réunion du 10 mars 1900 du Pen and Pencil Club.

38 Des épreuves de la photographie prise par Dyonnet de Frank Houghton se trouvent au Musée d’art du Centre de la Confédération (H-1821v), aux Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P034) et au Musée McCord (MP-1978.129.10, MP-1980.197.34, MP-1992.11.6 et MP-0000-2569.8). Une épreuve et le négatif du portrait fait par Dyonnet de Morrice sont conservés aux Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P052).

39 Annuaire Lovell de Montréal, 1902-1903, révisé le 20 juin 1902.

40 La candidature de Julien a été proposée par Dyonnet le 19 décembre 1891.

41 Voir « Sur les traces de Guillaume Couture », www.archiv.umontreal.ca/pdf/CoutureG.pdf.

42 Dans les annuaires Lovell de Montréal de 1903-1904 à 1909-1910, Couture est domicilié au 58, rue University avec Paul Lafleur et le Dr Henri Lafleur. Dans l’annuaire 1910-1911, il est recensé au « Fraser Institute Hall ».

43 Il faut comparer les photographies reproduites dans E.F.B. Johnston, « Art and the Work of Archibald Browne », The Canadian Magazine, vol. XXXI, no 6, octobre 1908, p. 529 et dans Saturday Night, vol. XXXIII, no 8, 6 décembre 1919, p. 3.

44 Dans Dyonnet, Mémoires, op. cit., p. 47, Joseph Franchère, Joseph Saint-Charles et Charles Gill sont présentés comme ses assistants. Selon les rapports annuels du Conseil, qui étaient publiés dans ceux du ministère de l’Agriculture du Québec, Charles Huot aurait enseigné dans l’école du Conseil à Québec à compter de 1894, Saint-Charles à l’école de Montréal dès 1898, Joseph Franchère dès 1899, et Louis-Philippe Hébert, de 1895 à 1898. Voir Daniel Drouin, « Chronologie », dans Louis-Philippe Hébert, Daniel Drouin (dir.), Québec, Musée du Québec, 2001, p. 332 et 333.

45 L’annuaire Lovell de Montréal de 1897-1898 (révisé le 25 juin 1897) recense Alphonse Jongers au 9, rue University, tout comme C.J. Way dans l’annuaire 1899–1900 (révisé le 27 juin 1899). Dans le catalogue de l’exposition du printemps tenue du 8 au 23 mars 1901, de l’Art Association of Montreal, l’adresse de Henri Beau est le 9, rue University. Beau a été élu membre du Pen and Pencil Club le 7 novembre 1903. Le portrait qu’a réalisé Dyonnet d’Henri Beau se trouve dans le fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P003).

46 La carte d’identité de Fabien pour l’Exposition universelle de Paris de 1900 se trouve dans le fonds Henri Fabien, Centre de recherche en civilisation canadienne-française, Université d’Ottawa (Ph28-B8). « Correspondance parisienne », La Patrie, datée du 1er avril 1902 à Paris (P28 1/2) note son retour imminent au Canada en juin. Sur des photographies du même fonds, dont une mention indique qu’elles ont été prises dans son studio de Montréal, Fabien n’a plus de barbe (Ph28-B14 et Ph28-B15). Il a déménagé à Ottawa en 1905.

47 Voir les rapports annuels de l’Art Association of Montreal pour les années 1892 à 1900.

48 « Art Notes », Saturday Night, 28 septembre 1895, p. 9.

49 Entrée non datée du journal d’Edmund Morris, fonds Edmund Montague Morris, Archives de l’Université Queen’s. William Cruikshank, Toronto à Edmund Morris, Hillhurst, 10 octobre 1898 (collection Edward J. Stone 4–6, Bibliothèque de recherche et archives Edward P. Taylor, Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario).

50 La toile que peint Dyonnet, A Yoke of Oxen, figure dans la vue de son studio présentée dans « Some Representative Canadian Sculptors and Painters », Daily Witness, Montréal, 2 avril 1898, accompagnée de la légende « on exhibition at the Art Gallery ». Elle a été exposée à l’exposition du printemps de l’Art Association of Montreal à compter du 4 avril 1898.

51 Sur leurs efforts pour breveter et vendre le chevalet Corot, voir le fonds Charles Porteous, Bibliothèque et Archives Canada (R7381-0-0-E) : Henry A. Budden à E. Dyonnet, Montréal, 26 février 1898 et Charles Porteous à Dyonnet, Beaupré, 12 juin 1898 (livre de lettres 20, chronologique); Dyonnet, Montréal à Porteous, 20 juin 1898 et Porteous à J.D. Smith, Artists Supplies, Londres, 23 novembre 1899 (livre de lettres 21, chronologique); Dyonnet à Porteous, 6 mars 1900, Porteous à Donald Robb, Londres, 17 mars 1900 et Porteous à D. Robb, Londres, 17 avril 1900 (livre de lettres 22, chronologique); D. Robb, Londres à Porteous, 13 juin 1900 (vol. 8, chronologique); Porteous à D. Robb, 29 juin 1900 (livre de lettres 22, chronologique); et Dyonnet à Porteous, 6 octobre 1903 (vol. 11, chronologique).

52 M.J. Mount, « Joseph Franchère and his Work », The Canadian Century vol. II, no 4, 30 juillet 1910, p. 12.

53 The Year Book of Canadian Art 1913, Toronto, J.M. Dent & Sons, Limited, 1913, en regard de la p. 220.

54 Albert Laberge, Peintres et écrivains d’hier et d’aujourd’hui, Montréal, Édition privée, 1938, en regard des p. 29, 36 et 44.

55 Albert Laberge, Journalistes, écrivains et artistes, Montréal, Édition privée, 1945, en regard de la p. 184.

56 Voir les procès-verbaux des réunions du Pen and Pencil Club du 20 octobre 1904, des 14 octobre et 23 décembre 1905, et des 6 janvier et 17 février 1906. Le dévoilement du buste, qui est daté de 1905, est consigné dans le procès-verbal de la réunion du 9 février 1907.

57 M.O. Hammond, Toronto à Newton MacTavish, 26 octobre 1927, Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, dossier 7.4-Hammond, et entrées dans le journal de Hammond pour les 19, 25, et 26 octobre, les 8 et 21 novembre 1927, et les 7, 13, 18 et 25 janvier et 1er février 1928 dans le fonds M.O. Hammond, Archives publiques de l’Ontario (F-1075-5). Hammond a écrit chaque jour dans son journal de 1890 à sa mort en 1934.

58 Entrées dans le journal de M.O. Hammond du 20 août et des 16 et 18 novembre 1926. Nous n’avons trouvé aucune mention dans le journal de Hammond sur l’achat ou l’emprunt d’épreuves de Dyonnet. M.O. Hammond, Toronto à Eric Brown, Ottawa, 9 décembre 1927, Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, dossier 7.4-Hammond.

59 Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, dossier 7.4-Hammond. Les portraits qu’a faits Hammond de F.M. Bell-Smith, F. Brownell, William Brymner, W.H. Clapp, Wm. Cruikshank, J.C. Franchère, John Hammond, Robert Harris, Louis-Philippe Hébert, William Hope, F.W. Hutchison, O.R. Jacobi, Henri Julien, R. Tait McKenzie, J.W. Morrice, Edmund Morris, Charles Moss, A.D. Rosaire, Joseph Saint-Charles et C.J. Way, tous des copies de Dyonnet, faisaient partie de la série II de Hammond en décembre 1927. Le portrait qu’a réalisé Hammond de Charles Gill, présenté dans la série IX le 3 juillet 1932, et celui de John Pinhey, présenté dans la série VII le 24 mai 1930, sont aussi des copies de Dyonnet. Hammond a parfois réalisé une mise à jour du portrait de certains artistes, mais les premières versions, inspirées de Dyonnet, se trouvent dans la Bibliothèque de recherche et archives Edward P. Taylor du Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario et dans la Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada.

60 M.O. Hammond, Painting and Sculpture in Canada, Toronto, Ryerson Press, 1930, p. 59.

61 La copie de Hammond du portrait qu’a fait Dyonnet de Joseph Saint-Charles se trouve dans le fonds M.O. Hammond, Archives publiques de l’Ontario (F 1075-12-0-0-60).

62 Dyonnet a exposé un portrait de Maxime Ingres à l’exposition du printemps de l’Art Association of Montreal en 1894, d’Henri Julien lors d’une exposition caritative à l’hôpital Notre-Dame en octobre 1895, de William Herrick à l’exposition du printemps de 1900, de Charles Gill à l’exposition du printemps de 1901, de Charles Porteous à l’Académie royale des arts du Canada (ARC) en mars 1902 (illustré dans le catalogue 1903 de l’exposition du Dominion à Toronto), de Paul Lafleur à l’ARC en 1904, de John Hammond à l’exposition du printemps de 1913 et du Dr Burgess à l’ARC en 1913.

63 Jean Ménard, « Préface », Mémoires, op. cit., p. 12.

64 Procès-verbal de la réunion du Pen and Pencil Club du 18 décembre 1920, traduction libre.

65 Edmond Dyonnet, Memoirs, op. cit., p. 30. La rue University a été prolongée vers le sud en 1912 de Dorchester à la rue Belmont. L’adresse du hall de l’Institut Fraser est ainsi passée du 9 au 283, rue University (voir l’annuaire Lovell de Montréal pour 1912-1913 et 1913-1914). La réunion du conseil de l’ARC a eu lieu au studio de Dyonnet, situé au 283, rue University, le 25 mai 1912 (fonds de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada, Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, MG28 I 126, vol. 1, livre de procès-verbaux 2, p. 284). Dyonnet est toujours recensé au 283, rue University dans le catalogue de l’exposition 1913 de l’ARC qui commence le 20 novembre 1913, mais il est domicilié au 2011, rue Waverly dans l’édition 1914-1915 de l’annuaire Lovell (qui commence le 1er juillet 1914).

66 De 1909 à 1914, Clapp a loué un studio au 255, rue De Bleury appartenant au sculpteur G.W. Hill. L’adresse de Clapp dans le catalogue de l’exposition de février 1909 de l’Ontario Society of Artists, dans les catalogues des expositions printanières de l’AAM en 1909, 1910, 1912 et 1913, et dans l’annuaire Lovell de Montréal pour 1914-1915 (qui commence le 1er juillet 1914) est le 255, rue De Bleury. Dyonnet reprendra le studio de K.R. Macpherson à cette adresse en 1916 après la mort de ce dernier le 26 avril 1916.

67 Procès-verbal de la réunion du 21 novembre 1913 de l’ARC (fonds de l’ARC, vol. 2, p. 310).

68 A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country, Toronto, Clarke, Irwin & Company, 1958, p. 33. A.Y. Jackson, Valcartier, Québec à James MacCallum, Toronto, marque postale du 1er juillet 1915, fonds James MacCallum, Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada. A.Y. Jackson, Bramshott, Hants. à Florence Clement, Berlin, Ontario, 25 décembre 1915, fonds N.J. Groves, Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, Ottawa (MG30 D351, boîte 76, dossier 21).

69 Parmi les photos de Dyonnet faisant partie d’une collection privée en 2007 se trouvait un deuxième portrait de Jackson en uniforme, portant son chapeau. L’épreuve sur papier se trouve dans le fonds Naomi Jackson Groves, MG30 D351 / R7316, vol. 1211, dossier 119, Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, Ottawa. C’est une épreuve au platine-palladium de 15,4 sur 20,6 cm (coins inférieurs endommagés). (Courriel de Sophie Tellier, archiviste de référence, Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, à C. Hill, 31 octobre 2019.) Un portrait de Jackson en uniforme, réalisé par Harold Mortimer-Lamb, se trouve dans le dossier 122 de la même collection.

70 Dyonnet, Mémoires, op. cit., p. 53 à 56.

71 Rapport de Robert Harris sur l’atelier de modèle vivant de Montréal dans le procès-verbal de la réunion de l’ARC du 23 décembre 1898. Il est identifié comme « Gould, gentleman » (fonds de l’ARC, vol. 1, livre de procès-verbaux 2).

72 À l’exposition du printemps de l’Art Association of Montreal, 8 au 23 mars 1901, cat. 25, O.M. Gould, Esq.

73 A. Scott Carter, Kenneth Forbes, J.W.L. Forster, Wyly Grier, Emanuel Hahn, Gustav Hahn, Henri Hébert, Arthur Heming, C.W. Jefferys, F. McGillivray Knowles, Arthur Lismer et l’épreuve ancienne de R.F. Gagen.

74 Copie d’un article imprimé du périodique montréalais The Passing Show, vol. V, no 12, novembre 1931, p. 16.

75 L’annuaire Lovell de Montréal pour 1896-1897, 443, recense F. Sweet comme concierge de l’Art Association of Montreal au 23, sq. Phillips. La nature morte d’E. Ulric Lamarche, présentée à l’exposition du printemps 1897 de l’Art Association of Montreal, cat. 87, est représentée dans « Art Exhibition », Witness, Montréal, 31 mars 1897. L’inscription figurant sur la page de l’album ne peut pas porter à croire que Lamarche a assemblé l’album, puisqu’il s’agit de la dernière photographie de l’album, et que les portraits de Hammond sur les pages précédentes datent d’après la mort de Lamarche en 1921.

76 Une photographie de la peinture de Dyonnet The Last Crust, 1892. La même photographie se trouve dans le fonds Dyonnet à l’Université d’Ottawa (Ph9–10). D’autres photos du fonds, qui vient de la nièce de Dyonnet, Gabrielle Lorin, sont montées à l’arrière d’invitations à l’exposition 1918 de l’ARC (Ph9-9, Ph9-4, Ph9-14).

77 The Last Crust, Boy Playing Mandolin, titre inconnu [fermier chargeant de foin un chariot tiré par des bœufs], Portrait of Reverend Theo Lafleur, et un portrait d’un homme en robe d’universitaire.

78 La photographie de Fred Haines est identifiée de manière erronée par « Leatherdale, Toronto », soit le nom de la photographe inscrit au verso de l’épreuve.

79 T.R. Lee, Ingersoll, Ontario au Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, Ottawa, 4 juin [1949], Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, dossier 7.1-Jackson, dossier 6. Lee a signé Histoire de la ville de Baie-D’Urfé, Québec, Montréal, 1977.

80 T.R. Lee, Albert H. Robinson: The Painter’s Painter, hors commerce, Montréal, 1956; T.R. Lee, « An Artist Inspects Upper Canada: The Diary of Daniel Fowler, 1843 », Ontario History, vol. L, no 4, 1958, p. 211 à 218; T.R. Lee, « The Artist Turns Farmer: Chapters from the Autobiography of Daniel Fowler », Ontario History, vol. 52, no 2, 1960, p. 98 à 110.

81 Voir la note 79.

82 Un exemplaire des mémoires de Dyonnet se trouvant dans la Bibliothèque du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada présente l’ex-libris de T.R. Lee, conçu par Thoreau MacDonald, et y sont insérés un compte-rendu de six pages dactylographiées de la production par Lee du livre miméographié, un court article de Lee sur Dyonnet datant de mars 1953, ainsi qu’une note de William Colgate à Lee datant du 5 octobre 1953 et accompagnant deux pages dactylographiées de questions éditoriales de Colgate sur l’autobiographie de Dyonnet.

83 Collection Thomas Roche Lee, CA OTAG SC014, Bibliothèque de recherche et archives Edward P. Taylor, Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario, Toronto. La collection de Lee comporte aussi des lettres d’artistes aux écrivains d’art William Colgate et Albert Laberge.

84 Parmi les photographies que Lee a offertes au Musée des beaux-arts du Canada en 1954 se trouvent celle de la peinture de Kenneth Forbes The Catch et le portrait du col. D.S. Forbes qui figure dans l’album d’Ottawa (no 108) (T.R. Lee, Baie-D’Urfé à R.H. Hubbard, Ottawa, 25 mai 1954, Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, dossier 1.8-Lee).

85 Les mentions sur la photo de Hammond du jury de l’ARC en 1880 semblent avoir été écrites par Lee.

Tous les portraits sont identifiés par une mention à l’encre inscrite sur la page de l’album sous la photographie. Nous reproduisons les titres tels qu’ils sont inscrits, à moins d’une erreur d’identification. Les autres inscriptions, attribuables à différents auteurs, sont également rapportées. Les membres du Pen and Pencil Club sont identifiés par un astérisque.

Mention écrite au feutre noir sur la couverture : ARTISTS &/Architects/Circa 1908–1918 (fig. 1).

  • P. 1, verso :

    1.

    Edmond Dyonnet, F.S. Challener, vers 1911

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,3 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • Dyonnet a invité l’artiste torontois Fred Challener (1867 – 1959) à assister aux réunions du Pen and Pencil Club du 11 février et du 25 mars 1911.

    Fig. A1. Edmond Dyonnet, F.S. Challener, vers 1911. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,3 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    2.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W. Cruikshank, vers 1895-1897

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • L’artiste torontois William Cruikshank (1848 – 1922) a peint à Beaupré en 1895, ainsi qu’en 1897, alors en compagnie de Dyonnet.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de William Cruikshank est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

    Fig. A2. Edmond Dyonnet, W. Cruikshank, vers 1895-1897. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    3.

    Photographe inconnu, J.C. Miles, date inconnue

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • John Christopher Miles (1837 – 1911) était un artiste de Saint John, au Nouveau-Brunswick.

Fig. A3. Photographe inconnu, J.C. Miles, date inconnue. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 2, recto :

    4.

    Edmond Dyonnet, R.G. Mathews, vers 1903

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • Mention inscrite sous l’épreuve : « G.R. Matthews »

    • Richard George Mathews (1870 – 1955) a travaillé pour le Star de Montréal avant de s’établir à Londres en 1908. « Montreal News », Printer and Publisher, vol. XVII, no 3, mars 1908, p. 58. Le membre du Pen and Pencil Club George Murray a publié en 1903 Men and Women Merely Players. Some Drawings by R.G. Mathews, Montréal, The Renaissance Press.

    Fig. A4. Edmond Dyonnet, R.G. Mathews, vers 1903. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    5.

    Edmond Dyonnet, O.R. Jacobi, 1891*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,6 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Le peintre Otto Jacobi (1812 – 1901) a fait partie du Pen and Pencil Club du 17 mars 1890 à avril 1891, moment où il s’est établi à Toronto.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Jacobi est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

    Fig. A5. Edmond Dyonnet, O.R. Jacobi, 1891. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,6 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    6.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Robert Harris, vers 1891-1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • L’artiste Robert Harris (1849 – 1919) était présent lors de la fondation du Pen and Pencil Club le 5 mars 1890. Un détail gravé de ce portrait accompagnait « Some Representative Canadian Sculptors & Painters », Daily Witness, Montréal, 2 avril 1898.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Harris est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

Fig. A6. Edmond Dyonnet, Robert Harris, vers 1891-1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 2, verso :

    7.

    M.O. Hammond, R. F. Gagen, vers 1910

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 14,0 sur 9,6 cm (image : 13,8 sur 9,3 cm)

    • Une épreuve virée de la même photographie se trouve à la page 25 de l’album de M.O. Hammond, Canadian Artists, qui est conservé à la Bibliothèque et Archives du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada.

    • Une épreuve du portrait fait par Dyonnet de l’artiste torontois Robert Gagen (1847 – 1926) fait partie du fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P021).

    Fig. A7. M.O. Hammond, R. F. Gagen, vers 1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 14,0 sur 9,6 cm (image : 13,8 sur 9,3 cm)

    8.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W.H. Clapp, 1913*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Le peintre William Henry Clapp (1879 – 1954), qui rentre d’Europe en 1908, est élu membre du Pen and Pencil Club le 5 avril 1913.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Clapp est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

    Fig. A8. Edmond Dyonnet, W.H. Clapp, 1913. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    9.

    Edmond Dyonnet, A.D. Rosaire, date inconnue

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 11,0 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Ancien élève de Dyonnet au Conseil des arts et manufactures, le peintre Arthur Dominique Rosaire (1879 – 1922) s’est établi à Los Angeles en 1917 pour des raisons de santé.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Rosaire est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

Fig. A9. Edmond Dyonnet, A.D. Rosaire, date inconnue. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 11,0 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 3, recto :

    10.

    Edmond Dyonnet, F.M. Bell-Smith, vers 1910

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,6 sur 11,3 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • Le peintre Frederic Marlett Bell-Smith (1846 – 1923) a assisté aux réunions du conseil de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada à Montréal en novembre 1910 quand Dyonnet en a été fait le secrétaire. Une comparaison avec d’autres photographies de Bell-Smith porte à croire que le portrait date d’environ 1910.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de F.M. Bell-Smith est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

    Fig. A10. Edmond Dyonnet, F.M. Bell-Smith, vers 1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,6 sur 11,3 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    Horatio Walker – photo retirée

    • La photographie qu’a prise Dyonnet du peintre Horatio Walker (1858 – 1938) fait partie du fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P070). Voir fig. 11.

    11.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Autoportrait, vers 1912*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,2 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • L’un des quatre autoportraits d’Edmond Dyonnet (1859 – 1954) qui figurent dans l’album.

    • Le portrait qu’a peint G. Horne Russell de Dyonnet, et qui a été exposé pour la première fois en 1922, se fondait sur cette photographie. Voir les figs. 16 et 17.

Fig. A11. Edmond Dyonnet, Autoportrait, vers 1912. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,2 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 3, verso :

    12.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Homer Watson, vers 1902-
1910

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 16,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • Le peintre Homer Watson (1855 – 1936), de Doon en Ontario, a été invité à maintes reprises au Pen and Pencil Club à compter de 1902. Le 19 février 1910, Edmund Morris, Curtis Williamson, Archibald Browne et lui ont assisté à une réunion du club à l’occasion de l’exposition du Canadian Art Club à l’Art Association of Montreal.

    • Une deuxième photographie de Watson prise par Dyonnet se trouve dans le fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P073).

    Fig. A12. Edmond Dyonnet, Homer Watson, vers 1902-
1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 16,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    13.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J.C. Pinhey, vers 1891-1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,0 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Le peintre John Charles Pinhey (1860 – 1912) a fait partie du Pen and Pencil Club du 2 mai au 12 décembre 1891, après quoi il a déménagé à Hudson, non loin de Montréal. Les portraits que Pinhey et Dyonnet ont dessinés l’un de l’autre à la réunion du club du 2 mai 1891 sont conservés au Musée McCord (M966.176.34 et M966.176.35).

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Pinhey est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

    Fig. A13. Edmond Dyonnet, J.C. Pinhey, vers 1891-1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,0 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • J.W. Morrice – photo retirée

      • Le portrait qu’a fait Dyonnet de l’artiste James Wilson Morrice (1865 – 1924) se trouve dans le fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P052), et dans une collection privée.

      • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Morrice est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

  • P. 4, recto :

    14.

    Edmond Dyonnet, A.Y. Jackson, 1915

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 14,2 sur 9,6 cm (image : 13,8 sur 9,4 cm)

    • Mention inscrite au stylo à bille à droite : 1918.

    • L’artiste A.Y. Jackson (1882 – 1974) avait été l’élève de Dyonnet au Conseil des arts et manufactures de 1896 à 1899. Un deuxième portrait réalisé par Dyonnet d’A.Y. Jackson en uniforme militaire et portant son chapeau se trouve dans une collection privée.

    Fig. A14. Edmond Dyonnet, A.Y. Jackson, 1915. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 14,2 sur 9,6 cm (image : 13,8 sur 9,4 cm)

    15.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Gustav Hahn, vers 1907

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,0 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • L’artiste torontois Gustav Hahn (1866 – 1962) a assisté à des réunions du conseil de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada à Montréal en 1907 et en 1913.

    Fig. A15. Edmond Dyonnet, Gustav Hahn, vers 1907. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,0 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    16.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Alphonse Jongers, vers 1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,2 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Le peintre Alphonse Jongers (1872 – 1945), demi-frère de Maxime Ingres (no 90), a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 31 octobre 1896. Dans les catalogues des expositions des printemps 1897 et 1898 de l’Art Association of Montreal, Jongers est domicilié à l’Institut Fraser. Un détail gravé de ce portrait accompagnait « Some Representative Canadian Sculptors & Painters », Daily Witness, Montréal, 2 avril 1898.

    • Un deuxième portrait de Jongers fait par Dyonnet se trouve dans le fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P041).

Fig. A16. Edmond Dyonnet, Alphonse Jongers, vers 1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,2 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 4, verso :

    17.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E. Wyly Grier, vers 1899*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,3 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • La candidature de l’artiste torontois Edmund Wyly Grier (1862 – 1957) comme membre non résident du Pen and Pencil Club a été proposée par K.R. Macpherson et Paul Lafleur le 19 novembre 1892, et acceptée par vote le 3 décembre 1892. Présentant comme toile de fond un tissu tendu, la photographie a plus probablement été prise alors que Grier était à Montréal pour assister à des réunions du conseil de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada en 1899.

Fig. A17. Edmond Dyonnet, E. Wyly Grier, vers 1899. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,3 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 5, recto :

    18.

    Edmond Dyonnet, R.J. Wickenden, vers 1905*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • Mention écrite au stylo à bille par une main inconnue : of Quebec/Restorer etc.

    • L’artiste Robert John Wickenden (1861 – 1931) a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 11 novembre 1905.

Fig. A18. Edmond Dyonnet, R.J. Wickenden, vers 1905. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 5, verso :

    19.

    Edmond Dyonnet, A.D. Patterson, vers 1909*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,1 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • L’artiste Andrew Dickson Patterson (1854 – 1930) a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 23 octobre 1909.

Fig. A19. Edmond Dyonnet, A.D. Patterson, vers 1909. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,1 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 6, recto :

    20.

    Edmond Dyonnet, C.J. Way, 1899*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • Peu après son retour de Suisse, l’artiste Charles John Way (1835 – 1919) a fait partie du Pen and Pencil Club du 7 janvier 1899 au 21 octobre 1900. Il a occupé un studio à l’Institut Fraser de 1899 à 1900.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de C.J. Way est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

Fig. A20. Edmond Dyonnet, C.J. Way, 1899. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 6, verso :

    21.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Edmund Morris, vers 1905

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • L’artiste torontois Edmund Morris (1871 – 1913) a assisté en tant qu’invité de Dyonnet à la réunion du Pen and Pencil Club du 28 octobre 1905.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Morris est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

Fig. A21. Edmond Dyonnet, Edmund Morris, vers 1905. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 7, recto :

    22.

    Edmond Dyonnet, A.C. Williamson, vers 1907-
1910

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • L’artiste torontois Albert Curtis Williamson (1867 – 1944) a peint à Beaupré à l’été 1904 en compagnie de Dyonnet et d’Edmund Morris. Il a été admis à l’ARC à Montréal en 1907. Il a assisté, en tant qu’invité de William Brymner, aux réunions du Pen and Pencil Club des 17 et 31 décembre 1910.

    • Un deuxième portrait de Williamson réalisé par Dyonnet se trouve dans le fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P077).

Fig. A22. Edmond Dyonnet, A.C. Williamson, vers 1907-
1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 7, verso :

    • M.A. Suzor-Coté – photo retirée

      • Voir no 88.

  • P. 8, recto :

    23.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J.C. Franchère, vers 1905

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • L’artiste Joseph Charles Franchère (1866 – 1921) a été nommé membre associé de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada en 1902. Il a par ailleurs fait l’objet d’une exposition individuelle à l’Art Association of Montreal en décembre 1904. Un détail de cette photographie a été reproduit dans M.J. Mount, « Joseph Franchère and his Work », The Canadian Century, vol. II, no 4, 30 juillet 1910, p. 121.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Franchère est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

Fig. A23. Edmond Dyonnet, J.C. Franchère, vers 1905. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 8, verso :

    24.

    Edmond Dyonnet, R. Tait McKenzie, vers 1908

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • Le sculpteur Robert Tait McKenzie (1867 – 1938) a donné un cours sur l’anatomie à l’école de l’Art Association of Montreal en 1899 et en 1900, et il y a fait l’objet d’une exposition individuelle en avril 1908.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de McKenzie est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

Fig. A24. Edmond Dyonnet, R. Tait McKenzie, vers 1908. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 9, recto :

    • F.W. Hutchison – photo retirée

      • Des épreuves du portrait fait par Dyonnet de l’artiste Frederick W. Hutchison se trouvent dans l’album de McCord MP-1980-197.17, dans le fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P036) et dans une collection privée. Voir fig. 5.

  • P. 9, verso :

    25.

    Edmond Dyonnet, F. Brownell, vers 1910

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • L’artiste d’Ottawa Franklin Brownell (1857 – 1946) a visité Montréal à l’occasion des réunions du conseil de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada en 1902 et en 1910.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Franklin Brownell est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

Fig. A25. Edmond Dyonnet, F. Brownell, vers 1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 10, recto :

    26.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Charles Gill, vers 1910*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • Sur le portrait qu’a peint Dyonnet et exposé en 1901 (Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec – 1938.15), l’artiste et poète Charles Gill (1871 – 1918) semble plus mince et plus jeune. La photographie de Dyonnet a probablement aussi été prise après la photographie « Charles Gill jouant aux échecs en 1908 », reproduite dans La vie culturelle à Montréal vers 1900, Saint-Laurent, Fides, 2005, p. 279.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Gill est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

Fig. A26. Edmond Dyonnet, Charles Gill, vers 1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 10, verso :

    27.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W.St.T. Smith, 1904

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • L’artiste William St. Thomas Smith (1862 – 1947) a assisté à une réunion du Pen and Pencil Club le 26 novembre 1904, et a fait l’objet d’une exposition individuelle à l’Art Association of Montreal en décembre.

Fig. A27. Edmond Dyonnet, W.St.T. Smith, 1904. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 11, recto :

    28.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Charles Huot, date inconnue

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • L’artiste Charles Huot (1855 – 1930) a enseigné à l’école de Québec du Conseil des arts et manufactures de 1894 à 1899.

Fig. A28. Edmond Dyonnet, Charles Huot, date inconnue. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 11, verso :

    29.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J. Hammond, vers 1904-1910

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • Alors qu’il résidait à Sackville au Nouveau-
Brunswick, le peintre John Hammond (1843 – 1939) a disposé d’un studio à Montréal de 1895 à 1904, et il a assisté dans cette ville à des réunions du conseil de l’ARC en 1907, 1910 et 1911. Une épreuve tirée du négatif de cette photo est reproduite à la fig. 8.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de John Hammond est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

Fig. A29. Edmond Dyonnet, J. Hammond, vers 1904-1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 12, recto :

    30.

    Edmond Dyonnet, G.A. Reid, vers 1899

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • L’artiste torontois George Reid (1860 – 1947) a assisté à des réunions du conseil de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada à Montréal en 1899 et en 1902. Une comparaison avec d’autres photographies de Reid porte à établir que ce portrait date d’environ 1899.

Fig. A30. Edmond Dyonnet, G.A. Reid, vers 1899. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 12, verso :

    • Clarence A. Gagnon – photo retirée

    • La photographie qu’a prise Dyonnet de l’artiste Clarence Gagnon se trouve dans le fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P022).

  • P. 13, recto :

    31.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Julien, vers 1906*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

    • Dyonnet a proposé la candidature d’Henri Julien (1852 – 1908) au Pen and Pencil Club le 19 décembre 1891, et l’artiste y a été accepté par vote le 16 janvier 1892. Sur les portraits d’Henri Julien peints en 1891 (Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario 87/203 et Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec 49.65), le sujet est plus mince et plus jeune. Voir les figs. 12 et 13.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Julien est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

Fig. A31. Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Julien, vers 1906. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 15,5 sur 11,2 cm (image : 15,2 sur 10,9 cm)

  • P. 13, verso :

    32.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Philippe Hébert, vers 1907

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • S’il travaillait principalement à Paris, le sculpteur Louis-Philippe Hébert (1850 – 1917) se rendait souvent à Montréal; il y a notamment assisté aux réunions de l’ARC en 1907 et en 1913.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Louis-Philippe Hébert est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

    Fig. A32. Edmond Dyonnet, Philippe Hébert, vers 1907. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    33.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Archibald Browne, vers 1910*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 22 décembre 1923, le peintre Archibald Browne (1862 – 1948) a pourtant été photographié avant cette date. Il a assisté à une réunion du Pen and Pencil Club le 19 février 1910 avec d’autres membres du Canadian Art Club, et Dyonnet et Browne étaient à Paris ensemble à l’été 1910.

Fig. A33. Edmond Dyonnet, Archibald Browne, vers 1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 14, recto :

    34.

    M.O. Hammond, A. Scott Carter, 1927

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,6 sur 8,6 cm (image : 10,6 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Dans son journal, Hammond a noté qu’il a photographié l’artiste torontois Scott Carter (1881 – 1968) le 25 octobre 1927.

    Fig. A34. M.O. Hammond, A. Scott Carter, 1927. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,6 sur 8,6 cm (image : 10,6 sur 7,8 cm)

    35.

    M.O. Hammond, Gustav Hahn, 1927

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,8 sur 8,8 cm (image : 10,8 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Dans son journal, Hammond a noté qu’il a photographié l’artiste torontois Gustav Hahn (1866 – 1962) le 1er novembre 1927.

Fig. A35. M.O. Hammond, Gustav Hahn, 1927. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,8 sur 8,8 cm (image : 10,8 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 14, verso :

    36.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen, 1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Dyonnet a proposé la candidature de l’artiste montréalais Maurice Cullen (1866 – 1934) au Pen and Pencil Club le 31 octobre 1896, et elle a été acceptée par vote le 14 novembre 1896. Voir aussi la photographie 49.

    • Un deuxième portrait, plus tardif, de Cullen réalisé par Dyonnet se trouve dans le fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P017).

    Fig. A36. Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen, 1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    37.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W. Hope, vers 1891-1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • L’artiste montréalais William Hope (1863 – 1931) compte parmi les membres qui ont fondé le Pen and Pencil Club le 5 mars 1890.

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Hope est une copie d’un détail de cette photographie.

Fig. A37. Edmond Dyonnet, W. Hope, vers 1891-1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,8 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 15, recto :

    38.

    Edmond Dyonnet, G. Horne Russell, vers 1912*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • L’artiste montréalais G. Horne Russell (1861 – 1933) a fait son entrée dans le Pen and Pencil Club le 9 mars 1912.

    Fig. A38. Edmond Dyonnet, G. Horne Russell, vers 1912. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    39.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J.W. Beatty, vers 1913

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • L’artiste de Toronto J.W. Beatty (1869 – 1941) a assisté à des réunions du conseil de l’ARC à Montréal en novembre 1913.

Fig. A39. Edmond Dyonnet, J.W. Beatty, vers 1913. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat avec bordures fines virées imitant une épreuve au platine, 10,7 sur 8,1 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 15, verso :

    40.

    M.O. Hammond, Arthur Lismer, 1927

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,8 sur 8,8 cm (image : 10,6 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Dans son journal, Hammond a noté qu’il a photographié l’artiste torontois Arthur Lismer (1885 – 1969) le 29 novembre 1927.

    Fig. A40. M.O. Hammond, Arthur Lismer, 1927. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,8 sur 8,8 cm (image : 10,6 sur 7,8 cm)

    41.

    M.O. Hammond, Emanuel Hahn, 1927

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,8 sur 8,8 cm (image : 10,7 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Dans son journal, Hammond a noté qu’il a photographié le sculpteur torontois Emanuel Hahn (1881 – 1957) le 25 octobre 1927.

Fig. A41. M.O. Hammond, Emanuel Hahn, 1927. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,8 sur 8,8 cm (image : 10,7 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 16, recto :

    42.

    M.O. Hammond, J.W.L. Forster, 1927

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,2 sur 8,6 cm (image : 9,9 sur 7,2 cm)

    • Dans son journal, Hammond a noté qu’il a photographié l’artiste torontois J.W.L. Forster (1850 – 1938) le 1er novembre 1927.

    Fig. A42. M.O. Hammond, J.W.L. Forster, 1927. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,2 sur 8,6 cm (image : 9,9 sur 7,2 cm)

    43.

    M.O. Hammond, Arthur Heming, 1927

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,2 sur 8,6 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Dans son journal, Hammond a noté qu’il a photographié l’artiste torontois Arthur Heming (1870 – 1940) les 3 et 15 novembre 1927.

Fig. A43. M.O. Hammond, Arthur Heming, 1927. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 11,2 sur 8,6 cm (image : 10,4 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 16, verso :

    44.

    M.O. Hammond, C.W. Jefferys, 1927

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 12,2 sur 9,5 cm (image : 10,0 sur 7,3 cm)

    • Dans son journal, Hammond a noté qu’il a photographié l’artiste torontois C.W. Jefferys (1869 – 1951) le 8 novembre 1927.

    Fig. A44. M.O. Hammond, C.W. Jefferys, 1927. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 12,2 sur 9,5 cm (image : 10,0 sur 7,3 cm)

    45.

    M.O. Hammond, Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen, G. Horne Russell, 1926

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 8,8 sur 11,0 cm (image : 7,8 sur 10,0 cm)

    • Dans son journal, Hammond a noté qu’il a photographié les artistes montréalais Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen et G. Horne Russell au Arts and Letters Club de Toronto le 18 novembre 1926.

Fig. A45. M.O. Hammond, Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen, G. Horne Russell, 1926. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé avec bordures larges, 8,8 sur 11,0 cm (image : 7,8 sur 10,0 cm)

  • P. 17, recto :

    46.

    Photographe inconnu, Claire Fauteux, date inconnue

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, imitant une épreuve à l’albumine, 10,1 sur 6,4 cm

    • Un instantané de la peintre montréalaise Claire Fauteux (1890 – 1988) qui joue au golf.

    • William Brymner – photo retirée*

    • Il existe au moins deux portraits de l’artiste William Brymner (1855 – 1925) qui sont associés au Pen and Pencil Club et qui ont été réalisés par Dyonnet, soit la fig. 31 et celui du fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P009).

    • Le portrait qu’a fait M.O. Hammond de Brymner est une copie d’un détail de cette dernière photographie.

Fig. A46. Photographe inconnu, Claire Fauteux, date inconnue. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, imitant une épreuve à l’albumine, 10,1 sur 6,4 cm

  • P. 17, verso :

    47.

    Photographe inconnu, Margaret Houghton, date inconnue

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat sans bordures, 14,0 sur 10,6 cm

    • La peintre montréalaise Margaret Houghton (1865 – vers 1922) était la sœur de Frank Houghton (1862 – après 1931), membre du Pen and Pencil Club dont la photographie prise par Edmond Dyonnet se trouve au Musée d’art du Centre de la Confédération (CAG H 1921 v) et dans le fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P034).

    Fig. A47. Photographe inconnu, Margaret Houghton, date inconnue. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat sans bordures, 14,0 sur 10,6 cm

    48.

    William Notman, William Fraser, 1871

    • Épreuve à l’albumine sans bordures, 6,8 sur 8,7 cm (irrégulier)

    • L’artiste montréalais William Lewis Fraser (1841 – 1905), frère du peintre John Fraser (1838 – 1898), a travaillé pour le photographe William Notman de 1865 à 1875.

Fig. A48. William Notman, William Fraser, 1871. Épreuve à l’albumine sans bordures, 6,8 sur 8,7 cm (irrégulier)

  • P. 18, recto :

    49.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen, 1897

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique sur papier mat fin, sans bordures, 12,8 sur 10,1 cm

    • Mention écrite au stylo à bille sous la photographie : 1897

    • Cette photographie de Maurice Cullen (1866 – 1934) qui peint à Beaupré a probablement été prise par Dyonnet pour promouvoir le chevalet « Corot », qu’il avait conçu. Voir les figs. 12 et 13.

    Fig. A49. Edmond Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen, 1897. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique sur papier mat fin, sans bordures, 12,8 sur 10,1 cm

    50.

    Attribuée à Edmond Dyonnet, Wm. Brymner, vers 1891-1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique sur papier mat sans bordures, 12,0 sur 9,8 cm

    • Cette photographie informelle de l’artiste William Brymner (1855 – 1925) peut avoir été prise dans le studio d’Edmond Dyonnet. Dans une autre photographie que Dyonnet a prise de Brymner (collection privée), Brymner a en main la tanagra romaine que l’on voit sur une tablette derrière lui dans ce portrait. Par ailleurs, la chaise sur laquelle il est assis peut être aperçue sur d’autres photographies de Dyonnet (E. Wyly Grier, no 17, Paul Lafleur, no 61 et George Murray, no 63).

Fig. A50. Attribuée à Edmond Dyonnet, Wm. Brymner, vers 1891-1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique sur papier mat sans bordures, 12,0 sur 9,8 cm

  • P. 18, verso :

    51.

    Photographe inconnu, Wm. Brymner, vers 1910*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,7 sur 8,2 cm

    • Cette photographie de William Brymner (1855 – 1925) a été reproduite dans M.J. Mount, « William Brymner and His Work », The Canadian Century, 11 juin 1910, p. 7.

    Fig. A51. Photographe inconnu, Wm. Brymner, vers 1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,7 sur 8,2 cm

    52.

    Photographe inconnu, E. Dyonnet & E. Rimbault Dibdin, 1910

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • E. Rimbault Dibdin (1853 – 1941) était conservateur de la galerie d’art Walker à Liverpool, où Dyonnet a organisé l’exposition d’art canadien de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada en 1910.

Fig. A52. Photographe inconnu, E. Dyonnet & E. Rimbault Dibdin, 1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

  • P. 19, recto :

    53.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet, 1897*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,7 sur 8,3 cm

    • Dyonnet (1859 – 1954) a probablement pris cette photographie de lui-même qui peint à Beaupré pour promouvoir le chevalet Corot, qu’il avait conçu. Voir la fig. 13 et la photographie 49. La peinture posée sur le chevalet a été reproduite dans « Some Representative Canadian Sculptors and Painters », Daily Witness, Montréal, 2 avril 1898.

    Fig. A53. Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet, 1897. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,7 sur 8,3 cm

    54.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet, vers 1910*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 12,8 sur 10,1 cm

    • À la réunion du Pen and Pencil Club du 3 décembre 1910, William Brymner a annoncé que Dyonnet avait été nommé « Officier de l’Académie de la France »; c’est peut-être cette décoration qu’il porte au revers de son col. Selon l’apparence de Dyonnet, cette photo semble dater de la même époque que celle où il figure avec E. Rambault Dibdin (photographie 52).

Fig. A54. Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet, vers 1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 12,8 sur 10,1 cm

  • P. 19, verso :

    55.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E. Boyd, vers 1908-1909

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    • Ancien élève de Dyonnet, le peintre Edward Finley Boyd (1878 – 1964) était établi, selon le catalogue de l’exposition printanière 1909 de l’Art Association of Montreal, au 255, rue De Bleury avec G.W. Hill et W.H. Clapp.

    Fig. A55. Edmond Dyonnet, E. Boyd, vers 1908-1909. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    56.

    Photographe inconnu, Ovid Gould, date inconnue

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 9,8 sur 13,7 cm

    • Ovid M. Gould (? – 1911) a été membre de l’Art Association of Montreal de 1893 à 1911, et il a assisté à un atelier de modèle vivant à l’Académie royale des arts du Canada avec Dyonnet en 1898. À l’exposition du printemps 1901 de l’Art Association of Montreal, Dyonnet a présenté un portrait peint de Gould. L’annuaire Lovell de Montréal pour 1900-1901 le recense ainsi : « O.M. Gould, managing director, Gould Cold Storage Co. Ltd. ».

Fig. A56. Photographe inconnu, Ovid Gould, date inconnue. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 9,8 sur 13,7 cm

  • P. 20, recto :

    57.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Fabien, 1902

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 9,8 sur 6,8 cm

    • Sur la photographie de sa carte d’identité pour l’Exposition universelle de Paris en 1900, le peintre Henri Fabien (1878 – 1935) arbore une barbe similaire. Dyonnet a peint deux portraits de Fabien sans barbe (Musée des beaux-arts du Canada [28119] et Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario [69/30]).

    Fig. A57. Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Fabien, 1902. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 9,8 sur 6,8 cm

    58.

    Edmond Dyonnet, James Smith, vers 1910

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 14,5 sur 10,2 cm

    • L’architecte torontois James Smith (1832 – 1918) a été secrétaire-trésorier de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada de 1880 à 1910, après quoi Dyonnet a repris ces fonctions lors d’une réunion de l’Académie à Montréal.

Fig. A58. Edmond Dyonnet, James Smith, vers 1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 14,5 sur 10,2 cm

  • P. 20, verso :

    59.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J. Try-Davies, vers 1891-
1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Le courtier et auteur John Try-Davies (1839 – 1911) a toujours été recensé dans l’annuaire Lovell de Montréal en tant que « Davies » seulement. Or, il a inscrit « Try-Davies » sur la carte de sa photographie dans le fonds Robert Harris (CAG H-1921 y), et également opté pour ce nom sur la page titre de son livre, A Semi-detached House, and Other Stories (Montréal, J. Lovell, 1900), qui a été illustré par Harris et dédié au Pen and Pencil Club.

    Fig. A59. Edmond Dyonnet, J. Try-Davies, vers 1891-
1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    60.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J.E. Logan, vers 1891-1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 11,6 sur 9,2 cm

    • Le courtier d’assurance John Edward Logan (1852 – 1915), l’un des membres ayant fondé le Pen and Pencil Club le 5 mars 1890, avait adopté le nom de plume Barrie Dane. Il a écrit A Cry from the Saskatchewan (Montréal, Robinson, 1885), tandis que son ouvrage Verses a été publié à titre posthume par le Pen and Pencil Club en 1916.

Fig. A60. Edmond Dyonnet, J.E. Logan, vers 1891-1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 11,6 sur 9,2 cm

  • P. 21, recto :

    61.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Paul T. Lafleur, vers 1891-
1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Paul T. Lafleur (1860 – 1924), professeur d’anglais à l’Université McGill, a fait son entrée au Pen and Pencil Club le 17 mars 1890. Son frère Henri-Amédée Lafleur (1862 – 1939), aussi professeur à McGill, a également été photographié par Dyonnet (fonds Pen and Pencil Club, Archives de la Ville de Montréal [BM83_2P043]). Dyonnet a exposé des portraits peints de Paul T. Lafleur à l’Académie royale des arts du Canada en 1904, de son frère, l’avocat Eugène Lafleur, en 1906, et de leur père, le révérend Théodore Lafleur, en 1907.

    • Lafleur est photographié devant le paravent en papier. Toutes les épreuves de cette photographie qu’a vues l’auteur présentaient un défaut au centre gauche.

    Fig. A61. Edmond Dyonnet, Paul T. Lafleur, vers 1891-
1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    62.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Paul T. Lafleur, vers 1898*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Cette deuxième photographie de Lafleur (1860 – 1924), portant une barbe et des lunettes et posant devant un tissu tendu, a été prise à une date ultérieure.

Fig. A62. Edmond Dyonnet, Paul T. Lafleur, vers 1898. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

  • P. 21, verso :

    63.

    Edmond Dyonnet, George Murray, vers 1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Professeur de lettres classiques à la Montreal High School, George Murray (1830 – 1910) a fait son entrée au Pen and Pencil Club le 11 janvier 1896. En 1903, il a publié Men and Women Merely Players. Some Drawings by R.G. Mathews (Montréal, The Renaissance Press). Voir no 4.

    Fig. A63. Edmond Dyonnet, George Murray, vers 1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    64.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. Andrew Macphail, vers 1897*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Mention écrite au stylo à bille sous la photographie : (Sir)

    • Professeur au Bishop’s College et à McGill, puis rédacteur en chef de University Magazine (1907 à 1920), le Dr Andrew Macphail (1864 – 1938) a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 20 mars 1897.

Fig. A64. Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. Andrew Macphail, vers 1897. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

  • P. 22, recto :

    65.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Norman Rielle, vers 1891-
1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 12,1 sur 9,4 cm

    • L’avocat Norman T. Rielle, c.r. (dates inconnues) a fait son entrée au Pen and Pencil Club le 17 mars 1890. La même année, il avait fondé avec Eugène Lafleur, frère de Paul Lafleur, le cabinet Lafleur & Rielle; il figure dans l’annuaire Lovell de Montréal jusqu’en 1902. Rielle a prononcé un exposé sur des compositeurs modernes de chansons françaises en février 1892 à l’Art Association of Montreal et sur des chansons et des compositeurs américains en mai 1898.

    Fig. A65. Edmond Dyonnet, Norman Rielle, vers 1891-
1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 12,1 sur 9,4 cm

    66.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Wm. McLennan, vers 1891-
1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 11,5 sur 9,1 cm

    • Le notaire et auteur William McLennan (1856 – 1904), admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 17 mars 1890, a été président de l’Institut Fraser de 1898 à 1902. Louis-Philippe Hébert a sculpté un buste à son effigie à titre posthume d’après une photographie de Dyonnet. Voir les figs. 24 et 25.

Fig. A66. Edmond Dyonnet, Wm. McLennan, vers 1891-
1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 11,5 sur 9,1 cm

  • P. 22, verso :

    67.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. T.J.W. Burgess, vers 1894*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Administrateur en chef du Protestant Hospital for the Insane à Verdun au Québec, le Dr Thomas Joseph Workman Burgess (1849 – 1926) a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 24 novembre 1894. Il a présenté un essai sur l’art et la maladie mentale à la réunion du club du 15 mars 1902.

    Fig. A67. Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. T.J.W. Burgess, vers 1894. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    68.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Dean F.P. Walton, vers 1899*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Frederick Parker Walton (1858 – 1948), doyen de la Faculté de droit de l’Université McGill, a rallié le Pen and Pencil Club le 1er avril 1899.

Fig. A68. Edmond Dyonnet, Dean F.P. Walton, vers 1899. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

  • P. 23, recto :

    69.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet, vers 1905*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    • Posant devant un tissu tendu, Dyonnet (1859 – 1954) est assis sur une chaise rembourrée à dossier haut, que l’on n’aperçoit dans aucun autre portrait.

    Fig. A69. Edmond Dyonnet, E. Dyonnet, vers 1905. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    70.

    Edmond Dyonnet, L.R. Gregor, vers 1903*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Professeur de linguistique à l’Université McGill, Leigh Richmond Gregor (1860 – 1911) a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 7 novembre 1903.

Fig. A70. Edmond Dyonnet, L.R. Gregor, vers 1903. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

  • P. 23, verso :

    71.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Forbes Torrance, vers 1891-
1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • L’agent de manufacturiers Forbes Torrance (1851 – 1896), admis dans le Pen and Pencil Club le 29 mars 1890, était le père de la peintre Lilias Torrance Newton (1896 – 
1980).

    Fig. A71. Edmond Dyonnet, Forbes Torrance, vers 1891-
1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    72.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J.B. Abbott, vers 1902*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 12,3 sur 10,3 cm

    • Fils de sir John Abbott, président de l’Institut Fraser de 1870 à 1893 et premier ministre du Canada de 1891 à 1892, John Bethune Abbott (1851 – 1929) était avocat. Il a en outre assumé les fonctions de conservateur de l’Art Association of Montreal de 1901 à 1924, et rallié le Pen and Pencil Club le 12 avril 1902.

Fig. A72. Edmond Dyonnet, J.B. Abbott, vers 1902. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 12,3 sur 10,3 cm

  • P. 24, recto :

    73.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W.S. Maxwell, vers 1907*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    • L’architecte William Sutherland Maxwell (1874 – 1952) a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 21 décembre 1907.

    Fig. A73. Edmond Dyonnet, W.S. Maxwell, vers 1907. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    74.

    Edmond Dyonnet, K.R. Macpherson, vers 1892-
1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat sans bordures, 11,8 sur 10,0 cm

    • Avocat et artiste amateur, Kenneth Rose Macpherson (1861 – 1916) a rallié le Pen and Pencil Club le 16 janvier 1892. Il est ici photographié devant le paravent de papier. Voir aussi la photographie 82.

Fig. A74. Edmond Dyonnet, K.R. Macpherson, vers 1892-
1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat sans bordures, 11,8 sur 10,0 cm

  • P. 24, verso :

    75.

    Edmond Dyonnet, P.E. Nobbs, vers 1906*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • L’architecte Percy Erskine Nobbs (1875 – 1964) a fait son entrée au Pen and Pencil Club le 1er décembre 1906. Voir aussi la photographie 77.

    Fig. A75. Edmond Dyonnet, P.E. Nobbs, vers 1906. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    76.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Stephen Leacock, vers 1901*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Auteur et professeur à l’Université McGill, Stephen Leacock (1869 – 1944) a fait son entrée au Pen and Pencil Club le 7 décembre 1901.

Fig. A76. Edmond Dyonnet, Stephen Leacock, vers 1901. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

  • P. 25, recto :

    77.

    Edmond Dyonnet, P.E. Nobbs, vers 1908*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    • Cet autre portrait, endommagé, de l’architecte Percy Erskine Nobbs (1875 – 1964) portant un foulard et un manteau, a possiblement été réalisé à une date ultérieure à celle de la photographie 75. Une autre épreuve de ce portrait se trouve dans le fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P055).

    Fig. A77. Edmond Dyonnet, P.E. Nobbs, vers 1908. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    78.

    Edmond Dyonnet, C.M. Holt, vers 1902*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Cette épreuve a été tirée à l’envers. Une épreuve correctement tirée se trouve dans l’album de McCord MP-1980.197.18.

    • L’avocat Charles MacPherson Holt (1862 – vers 1950) a fait son entrée dans le Pen and Pencil Club le 13 décembre 1902.

Fig. A78. Edmond Dyonnet, C.M. Holt, vers 1902. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

  • P. 25, verso :

    79.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Karl Boissevain, vers 1898*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Consul général des Pays-Bas à Montréal, Karel Boissevain (1866 – ?) a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 8 janvier 1898. Il est rentré aux Pays-Bas en 1901.

    Fig. A79. Edmond Dyonnet, Karl Boissevain, vers 1898. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    80.

    Edmond Dyonnet, E.W. Arthy, vers 1892-1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Edward Westhead Arthy (vers 1853 – 1914), secrétaire et administrateur en chef du Bureau des commissaires d’écoles protestants de Montréal, a fait son entrée dans le Pen and Pencil Club le 17 décembre 1892.

Fig. A80. Edmond Dyonnet, E.W. Arthy, vers 1892-1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

  • P. 26, recto :

    81.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J. O’Flaherty, vers 1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Le journaliste et célèbre activiste irlandais John Joseph Calvin O’Flaherty (1855 – ?) a été membre du Pen and Pencil Club du 11 janvier 1896 au 16 octobre 1897, mais a assisté à des réunions du cercle de 1903 à 1910.

    Fig. A81. Edmond Dyonnet, J. O’Flaherty, vers 1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    82.

    Edmond Dyonnet, K.R. Macpherson, vers 1898*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Une deuxième photographie prise par Dyonnet de l’avocat Kenneth Rose Macpherson (1861 – 1916), posant devant un tissu tendu. Voir le no 74.

Fig. A82. Edmond Dyonnet, K.R. Macpherson, vers 1898. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

  • P. 26, verso :

    83.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Guillaume Couture, vers 1910*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Le compositeur et chef d’orchestre Guillaume Couture (1851 – 1915) a fait son entrée au Pen and Pencil Club en octobre 1892, devenant membre honoraire le 13 janvier 1894. Il louait un studio à l’Institut Fraser en 1910. Voir fig. 8.

    Fig. A83. Edmond Dyonnet, Guillaume Couture, vers 1910. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    84.

    Edmond Dyonnet, G.W. Hill, vers 1907*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    • Le sculpteur George William Hill (1862 – 1934) a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 26 octobre 1907.

Fig. A84. Edmond Dyonnet, G.W. Hill, vers 1907. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

  • P. 27, recto :

    85.

    Edmond Dyonnet, C.E.L. Porteous, vers 1898*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,4 cm

    • L’homme d’affaires et artiste amateur Charles Porteous (1848 – 1926) a rallié le Pen and Pencil Club le 19 novembre 1892. Dyonnet a peint son portrait en 1902.

    • Une photographie plus ancienne de Porteous prise par Dyonnet se trouve dans le fonds Robert Harris du Musée d’art du Centre de la Confédération à Charlottetown (H-1821z) et dans les albums de McCord MP-1980.197.7, MP-1992.11.18 et MP-0000-2569.18.

    Fig. A85. Edmond Dyonnet, C.E.L. Porteous, vers 1898. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,4 cm

    86.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W.F. Chipman, vers 1908*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 12,8 sur 10,1 cm

    • L’avocat, auteur, professeur à McGill et plus tard diplomate Warwick Fielding Chipman (1880 – 1967) est photographié ici en tenue de ville, vêtu d’un chandail et d’un foulard. Il a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 19 décembre 1908. Voir aussi la photographie 96.

Fig. A86. Edmond Dyonnet, W.F. Chipman, vers 1908. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 12,8 sur 10,1 cm

  • P. 27, verso :

    • Page blanche

  • P. 28, recto :

    87.

    Photographe inconnu, [Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté], vers 1930

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 12,8 sur 8,7 cm

    • Mentions écrites sur l’image, en bas à gauche à l’encre bleue « at Miami », en bas à droite à l’encre noire « Suzor », et inscription dans la bordure en bas à droite à l’encre bleue « Suzor Coté ».

    • Une photographie de rue de l’artiste Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté (1869 – 1937) prise après son déménagement en Floride à la suite d’une attaque d’apoplexie en 1927.

    Fig. A87. Photographe inconnu, [Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté], vers 1930. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 12,8 sur 8,7 cm

    88.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Suzor-Coté, vers 1909

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 12,7 sur 10,1 cm

    • Mention écrite sous l’image au stylo à bille : Suzor Cote/1909

    • Il y a deux autres photographies de Suzor-
Coté (1869 – 1937) prises par Dyonnet dans le fonds Pen and Pencil Club des Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P064 et BM83_2P065). Une variante de BM83_2P064 se trouve dans une collection privée.

    Fig. A88. Edmond Dyonnet, Suzor-Coté, vers 1909. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 12,7 sur 10,1 cm

    89.

    Photographe inconnu, A. Suzor-Coté, 1931

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 13,6 sur 8,7 cm

    • Une copie d’un article imprimé du périodique montréalais The Passing Show, vol. V, no 12, novembre 1931, p. 16, présentant une photographie de Suzor-Coté (1869 – 1937) avec sa sculpture Femmes de Caughnawaga.

Fig. A89. Photographe inconnu, A. Suzor-Coté, 1931. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 13,6 sur 8,7 cm

  • P. 28, verso :

    90.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Max Ingres, vers 1891-1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat sans bordures, 10,3 sur 7,8 cm

    • Professeur de français à l’Université McGill, Maxime Ingres (vers 1861 – 1931) a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 30 janvier 1892. Dyonnet a présenté un portrait peint d’Ingres à l’exposition du printemps 1894 de l’Art Association of Montreal.

    Fig. A90. Edmond Dyonnet, Max Ingres, vers 1891-1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier mat sans bordures, 10,3 sur 7,8 cm

    91.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W. Townsend, vers 1895-
1896*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 11,5 sur 9,4 cm

    • Walter Townsend (? – 1905) a été nommé membre du Pen and Pencil Club le 3 mars 1895, puis membre non résident le 14 novembre 1896, après son déménagement à Londres.

Fig. A91. Edmond Dyonnet, W. Townsend, vers 1895-
1896. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 11,5 sur 9,4 cm

  • P. 29, recto :

    92.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. John McCrae, vers 1905*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    • Médecin et auteur de Au champ d’honneur, le Dr John McCrae (1872 – 1918) a rallié le Pen and Pencil Club le 4 mars 1905.

    Fig. A92. Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. John McCrae, vers 1905. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    93.

    Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. J.L. Todd, vers 1908*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    • Professeur de parasitologie à l’Université McGill, le Dr John Lancelot Todd (1876 – 1949) a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 19 décembre 1908.

Fig. A93. Edmond Dyonnet, Dr. J.L. Todd, vers 1908. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

  • P. 29, verso :

    94.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W. Languedoc, vers 1905*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    • Compilateur en chef des recueils de jurisprudence du Québec, l’avocat William Charles Languedoc (1846 – 1914) a fait son entrée au Pen and Pencil Club le 11 novembre 1905.

    Fig. A94. Edmond Dyonnet, W. Languedoc, vers 1905. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,3 cm

    95.

    Edmond Dyonnet, J. MacNaughton, vers 1903*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • Professeur d’histoire ancienne et de lettres classiques à l’Université McGill, John MacNaughton (1858 – 1943) a fait son entrée au Pen and Pencil Club le 7 novembre 1903.

Fig. A95. Edmond Dyonnet, J. MacNaughton, vers 1903. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

  • P. 30, recto :

    96.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W.F. Chipman, après 1908*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • L’avocat Warwick Fielding Chipman (1880 – 1967) a été admis au Pen and Pencil Club le 19 décembre 1908. Voir aussi la photographie 86.

    Fig. A96. Edmond Dyonnet, W.F. Chipman, après 1908. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    97.

    Edmond Dyonnet, W. Herrick, vers 1900*

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

    • À l’exposition de mars 1900 de l’Art Association, Dyonnet a présenté un portrait peint de William Herrick (dates inconnues). Herrick a assisté à des réunions du Pen and Pencil Club en tant qu’invité de Kenneth Macpherson et de Maxime Ingres en 1897 et en 1899, respectivement. Il est devenu membre du club le 8 décembre 1900, et n’a assisté qu’à une réunion.

Fig. A97. Edmond Dyonnet, W. Herrick, vers 1900. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 10,8 sur 8,2 cm

  • P. 30, verso :

    98.

    M.O. Hammond, Tom Thomson

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 16,7 sur 11,3 cm (image : 16,0 sur 10,5 cm)

    • Copie d’une photographie ancienne du peintre torontois Tom Thomson (1877 – 1917) prise par W.D. McVey, Toronto, vers 1905.

Fig. A98. M.O. Hammond, Tom Thomson. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 16,7 sur 11,3 cm (image : 16,0 sur 10,5 cm)

  • P. 31, recto :

    99.

    M.O. Hammond, Henri Hébert, vers 1928*

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 11,1 sur 8,4 cm (image : 10,0 sur 7,3 cm)

    • Hammond a présenté ce portrait du sculpteur montréalais Henri Hébert (1884 – 1950) dans sa cinquième série le 10 mai 1929.

    Fig. A99. M.O. Hammond, Henri Hébert, vers 1928. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 11,1 sur 8,4 cm (image : 10,0 sur 7,3 cm)

    100.

    M.O. Hammond, Kenneth K. Forbes, vers 1928

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 11,0 sur 8,3 cm (image : 10,0 sur 7,3 cm)

    • Hammond a présenté cette photographie du peintre portraitiste torontois Kenneth Keith Forbes (1892 – 1980) dans sa cinquième série le 10 mai 1929.

Fig. A100. M.O. Hammond, Kenneth K. Forbes, vers 1928. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 11,0 sur 8,3 cm (image : 10,0 sur 7,3 cm)

  • P. 31, verso :

    101.

    M.O. Hammond, F. McGillivray Knowles, vers 1930

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 11,1 sur 8,5 cm (image : 10,0 sur 7,3 cm)

    • Hammond a présenté ce portrait de l’artiste torontois Farquhar McGillivray Knowles (1859 – 1931) le 18 mai 1930, à titre de remplacement d’un portrait plus ancien.

    A.Y. Jackson – photo retirée

    • Dyonnet a réalisé deux portraits de Jackson (1882 – 1974) en uniforme en juin 1915. Voir no 14.

Fig. A101. M.O. Hammond, F. McGillivray Knowles, vers 1930. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 11,1 sur 8,5 cm (image : 10,0 sur 7,3 cm)

  • P. 32, recto :

    102.

    M.O. Hammond, John Bell-Smith

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 11,0 sur 8,3 cm (image : 10,0 sur 7,3 cm)

    • Mention écrite sur la page, sous la photographie : John Bellsmith/1853/(self-portrait)

    • Une photographie prise par Hammond d’un autoportrait peint en 1853 par John Bell-Smith (1810 – 1883).

    Fig. A102. M.O. Hammond, John Bell-Smith. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 11,0 sur 8,3 cm (image : 10,0 sur 7,3 cm)

    103.

    M.O. Hammond, R.C.A. Hanging Committee, 1880

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 10,5 sur 8,6 cm (image : 7,4 sur 9,4 cm)

    • Mention écrite, dans la bordure du bas, à l’encre : H. Sandham, ?, ?, ? Napoléon Bourassa; sous l’image : R.C.A. Hanging Committee 1880

    • Copie d’une photographie de William Notman du comité d’accrochage de la première exposition de l’Académie des arts du Canada à Ottawa en mars 1880. Ce comité était formé (debout, de gauche à droite) de Robert Harris, de l’architecte Thomas Seton Scott, de Napoléon Bourassa, (assis, de gauche à droite) de Henry Sandham et de James Griffiths.

Fig. A103. M.O. Hammond, R.C.A. Hanging Committee, 1880. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 10,5 sur 8,6 cm (image : 7,4 sur 9,4 cm)

  • P. 32, verso :

    104.

    Photographe de Vancouver inconnu, John Radford, date inconnue

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 15,0 sur 10,0 cm (image : 10,6 sur 7,6 cm)

    • Mention écrite dans la bordure en bas à droite : by artist, John Radford/Vancouver

    • Le dessinateur et concepteur d’architecture John Radford (1860 – 1940) a quitté Toronto pour Vancouver en 1902. C’était un fervent opposant au modernisme.

    Fig. A104. Photographe de Vancouver inconnu, John Radford, date inconnue. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé, 15,0 sur 10,0 cm (image : 10,6 sur 7,6 cm)

    105.

    M.O. Hammond, E. Wyly Grier, 1927

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc sur papier glacé, 11,4 sur 8,7 cm (image : 10,5 sur 7,8 cm)

    • Dans son journal, Hammond a noté qu’il a photographié l’artiste torontois Edmund Wyly Grier (1862 – 1957) les 3 et 8 novembre 1927.

Fig. A105. M.O. Hammond, E. Wyly Grier, 1927. Épreuve en noir et blanc sur papier glacé, 11,4 sur 8,7 cm (image : 10,5 sur 7,8 cm)

  • P. 33, recto :

    106.

    Photographe inconnu, [Robert Harris, Neil McLennan, Otto Jacobi and William Brymner in Otto Jacobi’s studio], vers 1890

    • Épreuve à l’albumine sans bordure, 11,6 sur 16,9 cm (bords irréguliers et endommagés)

    • Mention écrite à la mine au verso : Paul Peel William Brymner/Robert Harris O.R. Jacobi

    • Cette photographie a été tirée à l’envers. Une épreuve correctement tirée se trouve dans le fonds Robert Harris du Musée d’art du Centre de la Confédération (CAGH-8890, fig. 1.1). Les sujets, photographiés dans le studio de Jacobi à l’Institut Fraser, sont identifiés sur l’épreuve de Charlottetown comme, de gauche à droite : « W. Brymner, O.R. Jacobi, Neil McLennan, R. Harris/Tough ». Ils se présentent ici de gauche à droite comme Robert Harris, Tough (le chien de Harris), Neil McLennan, Otto Jacobi et William Brymner.

Fig. A106. Photographe inconnu, [Robert Harris, Neil McLennan, Otto Jacobi and William Brymner in Otto Jacobi’s studio], vers 1890. Épreuve à l’albumine sans bordure, 11,6 sur 16,9 cm (bords irréguliers et endommagés)

  • P. 33, verso :

    107.

    Margaret Leatherdale, [Fred Haines], vers 1937

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 15,1 sur 10,0 cm

    • Mention écrite au verso à la mine : Leatherdale/Toronto; sous la photo, au stylo à bille : Mr. Leatherdale, Toronto

    • L’artiste torontois Frederick Haines (1879 – 1960) a été conservateur du Musée des beaux-arts de Toronto de 1927 à 1932 et directeur de l’École des beaux-arts de l’Ontario de 1932 à 1951.

Fig. A107. Margaret Leatherdale, [Fred Haines], vers 1937. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 15,1 sur 10,0 cm

  • P. 34, recto :

    108.

    Rapid, Grip & Batten, Montréal, [The Catch, Major D.S. Forbes]

    • Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé sans bordures, 15,0 sur 11,7 cm

    • Le nom de l’agence Rapid, Grip & Batten est estampé au verso de l’épreuve. Kenneth Keith Forbes (1892 – 1980) a peint ce portrait de son frère, le major Duncan Stuart Forbes (1889 – 1965) en 1935.

Fig. A108. Rapid, Grip & Batten, Montréal, [The Catch, Major D.S. Forbes]. Épreuve en noir et blanc à la gélatine argentique sur papier glacé sans bordures, 15,0 sur 11,7 cm

  • P. 34, verso :

    109.

    Photographe inconnu, Sweet looking at our still life, 1897

    • Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 15,2 sur 11,0 cm

    • Mention écrite à la mine sur la page de l’album, sous la photographie : Sweet looking/at our still life

    • F. Sweet est recensé comme concierge de l’Art Association of Montreal dans l’annuaire Lovell de Montréal pour 1896-1897. Cette nature morte d’Ulric Lamarche a été présentée à l’exposition du printemps de mars 1897 de l’Art Association of Montreal (reproduite dans « Art Exhibition », Daily Witness, Montréal, 31 mars 1897).

Fig. A109. Photographe inconnu, Sweet looking at our still life, 1897. Épreuve à la gélatine argentique, virée, sur papier glacé sans bordures, 15,2 sur 11,0 cm

Metrics

Downloaded 1,808 times

Subscription Options

Article History

Published in print: 1 April 2020
Version of record: 23 April 2020
Volume 11, April 2020, pp. 1-54

The essay identifies the photographers and subjects of photographs of Canadian artists, architects, and writers in an album in the Library and Archives of the National Gallery of Canada. It looks at the photographic practices of the Montreal painter Edmond Dyonnet within the context of the Pen and Pencil Club of Montreal and of the Toronto journalist M.O. Hammond in photographing Canadian artists and writers. An inventory of the contents of the album is provided, identifying photographers and subjects, with proposed dates in an Appendix.

In the Library and Archives of the National Gallery of Canada is a photograph album inscribed on the cover in black marker, “Artists & Architects circa 1908–1918” (fig. 1). Nothing is known about its provenance, nor who assembled the album.

Fig. 1. “Artists & Architects circa 1908–1918.” National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa. Photo: NGC

The inscribed title is somewhat misleading, as the album also contains portraits of Montreal writers, in addition to Canadian artists and architects. There are a total of 109 photographs in the album,1 of which seventy-eight are portraits of members of Montreal’s Pen and Pencil Club photographed by the painter Edmond Dyonnet (1859–1954). This essay will look at Dyonnet’s project of photographing club members and associates and at the various holdings of his photographs, try to determine a chronology of these images, identify other photographs in the Gallery’s album, and propose a provenance for the Ottawa album.

Born in Crest, France in June 1859, Edmond Dyonnet first came to Canada with his family in May 1875, returning to Europe to study in Turin, Naples, and Rome. By late October 1890,2 he was back in Montreal. He soon met John Pinhey, who found a studio for Dyonnet in the Imperial Building on Place d’Armes, and by March 1893, he had moved to 1002 Dorchester Street (now boulevard René Levesque) in the top floor of a house occupied by the Ingres-Coutellier School of Languages, run by French-born Maxime Ingres.3 By June 1894, Ingres’ school had moved to the Fraser Institute, where Dyonnet also found a studio.4

The Fraser Institute would be the stage for Dyonnet’s photographic project. The Institute had been established in 1870 as a free public library, though it would not open its doors until 1885, when it acquired Burnside Hall at the northeast corner of Dorchester and University Streets. Ground floor rooms were rented out to provide additional income.5 McGill’s Faculty of Law occupied rooms from 1886 to 18956 and Otto Jacobi and Robert Harris rented studios there in 1888.7 Harris described the facilities:

[t]he Fraser Institute is a large building on the N.W. [sic] corner of Dorchester and University streets not far from Phillips Square as you will see on the plan. All the upper floor is occupied as a public library. The lower floor consists of a large hall doors out of which open into several rooms one of which is my studio. This is a sketch plan of the lower floor [(fig. 2)]. The entrance on Dorchester street is the one to the library above and a man is stationed in the hall all the time. On the door on University St Jacobi and I have our brass plates with names on.8

A photograph in the National Gallery album shows Robert Harris, Otto Jacobi, and William Brymner in Jacobi’s studio at the Fraser Institute (no. 106).

Fig. 2. Plan of the ground floor of the Fraser Institute in a letter from Robert Harris, Montreal, to his mother, Charlottetown, 19 October 1890. Robert Harris fonds, Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Charlottetown, Gift of the Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAG H-4538)

The Pen and Pencil Club was established to bring together artists and writers for “social enjoyment and promotion of the Arts and Letters.” The first meeting was held on 5 March 1890 at the home of the painter William Hope and was attended by the artists Hope, William Brymner, and Robert Harris, the writers John Try-Davies and John E. Logan, and the Fraser Institute librarian R.W. Boodle.9 At the subsequent meeting they were joined by John Pinhey and the architect A.T. Taylor, the McGill professors S.E. Dawson, C.E. Moyse, and Paul Lafleur, and the lawyer Norman Rielle, and on 29 March, Otto Jacobi and Forbes Torrance added to their number. Membership was limited to thirty, and to men only, and by December 1892 a complement of twenty-seven artists and writers had been reached.10 Among the members were both professional and amateur artists, such as the financier William Van Horne, the lawyer Kenneth R. Macpherson, and the businessman Charles Porteous, and writers whose professions included lawyer, professor, doctor, and stockbroker. Meeting every two weeks, fall through spring, the members selected subjects to be interpreted in compositions, verse, or prose at the subsequent meeting. The mingling of the arts resulted in several cooperative publications, including John Try-Davies’ A Semi-detached house and other stories (Montreal: J. Lovell, 1900), illustrated by Robert Harris and dedicated to the club, and E.B. Brownlow’s Orphans and other poems and John E. Logan’s Verses, published by the club in 1896 and 1916, respectively. The atmosphere was dominated by intelligence, creative energy, and good humour, as evidenced by the annual end-of-season celebration of “unrecognized genius.” Several Pen and Pencil Club members were also active in the affairs of the Fraser Institute, most notably William McLennan, who was the Institute’s president from 1898 to 1902.11

Dyonnet attended his first meeting of the Pen and Pencil Club on 24 January 1891, when he was nominated for membership by William Brymner. Elected two weeks later, Dyonnet would be a prominent figure in the Club for the next sixty years. He was elected Vice-President in November 1894, President the following year, and Treasurer from 1903 to 1913, from 1916 to 1937, and from 1940 to 1947.12 Club meetings were held at Dyonnet’s Fraser Institute studio from November 189413 to November 1910 and subsequently in his Bleury Street studio from 1916 to 1937 and again from 1940 to 1947.14

Dyonnet was a club man and his career revolved around artists and arts organizations. Not only did he occupy various positions in the Pen and Pencil Club, but also he was Secretary of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts from 1910 to 1947, author of a history of the Academy with Hugh Jones in 1934, and a charter member of Montreal’s Arts Club in 1912. He saw himself as part of a larger community of artists that included Canadian artists of the past. In December 1912 he wrote to E.R. Greig, Curator of the Art Museum of Toronto, “I have collected records of over 100 Canadian artists from the very beginning of art in Canada to the present time.”15 Dyonnet’s best-known painted portraits are of fellow artists, including Henri Julien, Charles Gill, Henri Fabien, and sculptor Thomas Carli.16 In addition, he taught drawing at Montreal’s Council of Arts and Manufactures (1892–1922), the Art Association of Montreal (1901–8), the École Polytechnique de Montréal (1907–22), and Montreal’s École des Beaux-Arts (1922–4) and in the School of Architecture at McGill University (1920–36).

At the Pen and Pencil Club meeting of 21 March 1896, Maxime Ingres17 “mentioned the project of a club album of photographs and autographs of members, the former having been offered by Mr. Dyonnet some specimens of whose work were on view.”18 From this one might assume that Dyonnet had already begun to photograph club members, and the acceptance of his proposal formalized the project.

Dyonnet’s photographs were distributed among fellow members, and in 1950 B.K. Sandwell wrote to Dyonnet, “I still treasure your photographs of the early members of the Club and the memory of many happy evenings spent in your studio.”19 A set of twenty-eight vintage portraits of club members, mounted on cards and all signed by the sitter, is with the papers of charter member Robert Harris in the Confederation Centre Art Gallery in Charlottetown.20 Four collections of vintage prints of varying content, some signed and some not signed, with minor variations in cropping and framing, but all of club members, are in the McCord Museum, which also holds the archives of the Pen and Pencil Club. However, the portraits did not come with the Club papers, even though the initial resolution of 21 March 1896 stated that the photographs should be put into the ordinary club album instead of into a separate book. Two of the McCord collections are from unknown sources and two came from descendants of club members, Paul Lafleur and Charles Porteous.21

A sixth collection of Dyonnet’s photographs is in the Archives de la Ville de Montréal. These had been donated by Dyonnet to the Bibliothèque de la Ville de Montréal prior to 195122 and were transferred to the Archives in 1997. The collection consists of seventy-seven black and white prints mounted in an album, plus the glass plate negative for each portrait.23 This album was assembled in the early 1940s, as club member Warwick Chipman is identified as Ambassador to Chile, a posting he occupied from 1942 to 1945.24 It is probably the album of photographs of “old members and friends of the Pen and Pencil Club” that Dyonnet presented at the club meeting of 28 February 1942. The cover is inscribed in ink, “Pen and Pencil Club/Portraits des membres,” and typed on an inserted end paper, “PEN AND PENCIL CLUB/PORTRAITS DES MEMBRES/Compilée par Edmond Dyonnet, R.C.A.” Yet the title is again erroneous, as only forty-nine of the seventy-seven photographs depict club members, the additional twenty-eight being fellow artists and one non-artist, Dr. Henri Lafleur.25 Nor is it clear who physically assembled the album. Each subject is identified in ink by name, profession, and, where appropriate, status of membership in the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. However there are errors of spelling26 and identification of R.C.A. membership27 that would have been unacceptable to Dyonnet as long-term secretary of the Academy. Nor is the album a complete catalogue of Dyonnet’s photographs. The absence of glass negatives for a number of Dyonnet’s portraits found in other collections suggests that by the 1940s a number of negatives had been broken.

An additional collection of eighty-two portraits, mounted on card and identified in an unknown hand, was with a Montreal collector in 2007.28 Most of those prints are more tightly cropped, focusing on the subject’s head and chest. Seventy-eight prints of Dyonnet’s photographs are in the National Gallery album.

Defining a chronology of Dyonnet’s photographs poses a number of challenges. All the portraits in the Robert Harris fonds in Charlottetown bear dates inscribed in graphite in a modern hand. The cataloguer made the correct assumption that the photographs were linked to the Pen and Pencil Club, as the dates refer to the subject’s date of membership. However, as some bear dates predating Dyonnet’s return to Montreal in October 1890,29 they cannot be the dates the photographs were taken.

Club membership was the core of Dyonnet’s project, but it does not necessarily confirm the date of the photographs, as it is not clear if being photographed was an immediate benefit of membership. Some club members were not photographed by Dyonnet, the option presumably being up to the individual member.30 Some subjects, both members and non-members, were photographed twice at different sessions.31 Date of membership is clearly irrelevant for those subjects who were not club members.

With three exceptions, all the photographs appear to have been taken in Dyonnet’s studio. One exception might be the earliest portrait, that of Otto Jacobi, who moved from Montreal to Toronto in April 1891.32 Uniquely, Jacobi was photographed in his home,33 with Mrs. Jacobi glimpsed through the door (no. 5). In May 1896, prints were sent to Jacobi in Toronto for his signature.34

One can suggest groupings of portraits by the backgrounds against which the subjects were photographed. Twenty-one club members were photographed against a papered folding screen, as seen in Dyonnet’s self-portrait (fig. 3). An easily transportable piece of furniture, it might have been used in his two earlier studios before he moved to the Fraser Institute in 1894. The dates of membership of these sitters range from 1890 to 1896, forming a homogenous group, whose photographs can then be dated between 1891 and 1896.35 Four non-member artists, William Cruikshank, Charles Moss, Joseph Saint-Charles, and Horatio Walker, as well as Dr. Henri Lafleur,36 were also photographed in front of the screen.

Fig. 3. Edmond Dyonnet, Self Portrait, c. 1894, silver gelatin print mounted on card, 11.4 × 9.1 cm; card: 17.6 × 15 cm. Robert Harris fonds, Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Charlottetown, Gift of the Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAG H1821-k)

Fifty-six portraits, of which thirty-seven are of club members (including three self-portraits by Dyonnet), were taken against a cloth background. The cloth was hung in front of a carved Norman pearwood armoire that Dyonnet’s family had brought to Canada,37 as seen in the glass negative for the portrait of John Hammond (fig. 4). The armoire makes an impressive background for the portraits of club member R.J. Wickenden (no. 18) and three non-members, Joseph Franchère (no. 23), R.G. Mathews (no. 4), and Edmund Morris (no. 21). All subjects were photographed seated, save for Frank Houghton, J.W. Morrice,38 and Dyonnet’s self-portrait of 1910 (no. 54). F.W. Hutchison, who had a studio in the Fraser Institute by June 1902,39 was photographed against a background of a paisley-patterned textile (fig. 5).

Fig. 4. Edmond Dyonnet, John Hammond, c. 1904–1910, positive print from glass negative 16.4 × 12 cm. Fonds Edmond Dyonnet, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_1P027)

Fig. 5. Edmond Dyonnet, F.W. Hutchison, c. 1902, black and white matt print with white border, 12.3 × 9.6 cm with border (image 11.6 × 8.9 cm). Fonds Pen and Pencil Club, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P036)

The dates of membership of the club members photographed against the cloth hanging range from 1892 to 1913. However, once again, the membership dates do not always provide dates for the photographs. In 1891, Dyonnet painted a portrait of Henri Julien, former professor at the Council of Arts and Manufactures and club member from 26 January 189240 (fig. 6). Dyonnet’s photograph of Julien (fig. 7) was clearly taken many years later. Similarly, a photograph dated in the negative 20 May 190041 (fig. 8) of composer and organist Guillaume Couture, club member from 8 October 1892 to 13 January 1894, shows a considerably younger man than seen in Dyonnet’s portrait42 (fig. 9). Archibald Browne only became a member of the Pen and Pencil Club in 1923; however, comparison with a photo of Browne taken in 1919 confirms that Dyonnet’s photograph (no. 33) was taken earlier than 1923.43

Fig. 6. Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Julien, 1890, oil on hardboard, 35.2 × 26.5 cm. Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Gift of Anonymous Donor, 1987 (87/203). Photo: © Art Gallery of Ontario

Fig. 7. Edmond Dyonnet, Henri Julien, c. 1906, matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 15.5 × 11.2 cm (image 15.2 × 10.9 cm). National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #31, p. 13 recto). Photo: NGC

Fig. 8. Unknown photographer, Guillaume Couture, 20 mai 1900. 1 photograph: b&w print, 25 × 20 cm. Archives, Université de Montréal, Fonds Guillaume Couture, P0014/F,0005

Fig. 9. Edmond Dyonnet, Guillaume Couture, c. 1910, toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.8 × 8.2 cm. National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #83, p. 26 verso). Photo: NGC

With the exception of Dr. Henri Lafleur, subjects who were not members of the Pen and Pencil Club were all artists and not writers. They were associated with Dyonnet through the Council of Arts and Manufactures, the Fraser Institute, or the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. Associates at the Council’s Montreal and Quebec schools included Charles Huot, Joseph Franchère, Charles Gill, Louis-Philippe Hébert (nos. 28, 23, 26, 32), and Joseph Saint-Charles.44 Dyonnet’s former pupils at the Council included Henri Fabien, A.Y. Jackson, Edward Boyd, and Dominique Rosaire (nos. 57, 14, 55, 9). Fellow tenants at Fraser Hall included the aforementioned F.W. Hutchison as well as Alphonse Jongers, half-brother of Maxime Ingres, C.J. Way (nos. 16, 20), and Henri Beau.45 James Smith was Dyonnet’s predecessor as secretary of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (no. 58), and other Toronto and Ottawa members of the Academy came to Montreal to attend exhibition openings and meetings of the Academy’s Council.

In addition to comparison with other surely dated photographs of his subjects, more specific dating of Dyonnet’s photographs can be proposed by the subjects’ various absences and presences in Montreal. Henri Fabien (no. 57) sported a beard in his identity card as exhibitor at the 1900 International Exposition in Paris, but removed it shortly after his return to Montreal in 1902.46 Charles Moss (fig. 10) was director of the Ottawa School of Art from 1883 to1888, when he left for Orange, NJ, but he returned to teach a six-week watercolour class at the Art Association of Montreal each autumn from 1892 to 1900.47 He attended a meeting of the Pen and Pencil Club on 17 October 1896. William St. Thomas Smith (no. 27) had a solo exhibition at the Art Association of Montreal in November 1904 when he was a guest at a club meeting on November 26.

Fig. 10. M.O. Hammond, copy of Edmond Dyonnet’s portrait of Charles Moss, c. 1896, positive scan from negative. M.O. Hammond fonds, Archives of Ontario, Toronto (F 1075-12-0-0-56)

Dyonnet’s painting companions were also photographed. William Cruikshank (no. 2) first painted on the Lower Saint Lawrence in 1895,48 and in the summer of 1897 Edmund Morris, Cruikshank, Dyonnet, and Maurice Cullen all painted at Beaupré, crossing over to visit Horatio Walker on the Île d’Orléans.49 (fig. 11) At Beaupré, Dyonnet photographed Cullen and himself painting with canvases on a collapsible easel of Dyonnet’s design50 (fig. 12 and no. 49). From 1898 to 1903, with the aid of Charles Porteous, he would try to patent and market it as the Corot easel (fig. 13).51

Fig. 11. Edmond Dyonnet, Horatio Walker, c. 1895–1897, black and white matt print with white border, 12.3 × 9.6 cm with border (image 11.6 × 8.9 cm). Fonds Pen and Pencil Club, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P070)

Fig. 12. Edmond Dyonnet, Self-portrait at Beaupré, 1897, glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 10.7 × 8.3 cm. National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #53, p. 19 recto). Photo: NGC

Fig. 13. Edmond Dyonnet, Corot Easel, c. 1898, glossy silver gelatin print mounted on card, 12 × 9.4 cm, card 18.5 × 11.8 cm. National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa. Photo: NGC

Dyonnet’s photographs circulated in various ways during his lifetime, though he was never identified as their author. Details of his portraits of Alphonse Jongers (no. 16), Robert Harris (no. 6), and William Brymner (fig. 19) and his self-portrait (fig. 3) were engraved for the article “Some Representative Canadian Sculptors and Painters” in the Montreal Daily Witness of 2 April 1898, and a detail of Joseph Franchère’s portrait accompanied M.J. Mount’s article on Franchère in The Canadian Century in July 1910.52 Dyonnet illustrated his own article, “L’art chez les canadiens-français,” in The Year Book of Canadian Art 1913 with details of his photographs of Clarence Gagnon, Louis-Philippe Hébert, Henri Julien, and Charles Huot.53 Albert Laberge reproduced Dyonnet’s photographs of Henri Beau, Maurice Cullen, and Arthur Rosaire in Peintres et Écrivains d’Hier et d’Aujourd’hui54 and Dyonnet’s portrait of Joseph Franchère in Journalistes, Écrivains et Artistes.55

On two occasions, Dyonnet’s portraits were used by others, with the artist’s consent, as the basis for their own works of art. In 1905, the Pen and Pencil Club raised a subscription for a bust of the late William McLennan for the Fraser Institute and McGill Library, two institutions with which McLennan was closely connected.56 The sculptor, Louis-Philippe Hébert, based his portrait on Dyonnet’s photo (figs. 14 and 15). In 1922, G. Horne Russell, then President of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, of which Dyonnet was Secretary, painted a portrait of Dyonnet from the latter’s photograph of himself (figs. 16 and 17).

Fig. 14. Edmond Dyonnet, William McLennan, c. 1891–1896, toned glossy silver gelatin print with no border, 11.5 × 9.1 cm. National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #66, p. 22 recto). Photo: NGC

Fig. 15. Louis-Philippe Hébert, William McLennan, 1905, bronze, 56.8 × 52.1 × 31.3 cm. Visual Arts Collections, McGill University, Montreal (1975-018). Photo: NGC

Fig. 16. Edmond Dyonnet, Self-portrait, 1912, matt gelatin toned silver print with thin toned border imitating platinum print, 10.7 × 8.2 cm (image 10.4 × 7.8 cm). National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #11, p. 3 recto). Photo: NGC

Fig. 17. G. Horne Russell, Edmond Dyonnet, 1922, oil on canvas, 79.3 × 64 cm. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Gift of Gabrielle Lorin, Saint-Laurent, Québec, 1974 (17947). 
Photo: NGC

Dyonnet was not the only person producing a corpus of portraits of Canadians prominent in the arts. The Toronto Globe journalist, editor, and art critic M.O. Hammond (1876–1934) was an active member of a number of art and literary circles and regularly photographed members of the Arts and Letters Club, the Canadian Art Club, and other organizations over a period of twenty-five years, exhibiting his photographs with various camera clubs. In the fall of 1927, he packaged a series of these portraits of Canadian artists and sold them to the Art Gallery of Toronto, the Toronto Public Library, the National Gallery of Canada, and the government of Quebec.57 Subsequently he offered portraits of deceased artists that were, by necessity, copied from photographs, engravings, drawings, or oils made by others. Dyonnet was in Toronto on Academy business twice in 1926 when Hammond photographed him with Maurice Cullen and G. Horne Russell (no. 45), and Hammond must have acquired prints from Dyonnet for his second series, which he offered in December 1927.58 This series included nineteen portraits that are details of photographs taken by Dyonnet. He subsequently also offered copies of Dyonnet’s portraits of Charles Gill and John Pinhey59 and reproduced a detail of Dyonnet’s portrait of Louis-Philippe Hébert in his book Painting and Sculpture in Canada.60 Dyonnet’s photographs of Charles Moss and Joseph Saint-Charles are only known through Hammond’s copies61 (fig. 10).

In addition to teaching, Dyonnet made his living as a portrait painter, and, while he both painted and photographed fellow artists Henri Julien, Charles Gill, Henri Fabien, and John Hammond and club members Maxime Ingres, William Herrick, Charles Porteous, Paul Lafleur, and J.T.W. Burgess,62 he did not use his photographs as studies for paintings. His photo documentation was a separate project. However, it appears that Dyonnet’s photography did become a matter of concern to him. Thomas Garside told Dyonnet’s biographer Jean Ménard that it became rumoured that Dyonnet used photographs to paint his portraits and, fearing to risk his reputation, he destroyed his camera.63 This was not entirely correct, for in 1920, Dyonnet told club member Percy Nobbs that “the photographic gallery of Club members was no longer being kept up. Dyonnet stated that he had been represented as a professional photographer, to which apparently he strongly objected. He would however be glad to lend his camera for the purpose of keeping up the collection.”64

Dyonnet stopped taking photographs in 1913. The catalyst appears to have been his forced move from the Fraser Institute in early 1914 due to major renovations.65 W.H. Clapp became a member of the Pen and Pencil Club in April 1913 and appears to have been the last member photographed in Dyonnet’s old studio66 (no. 8). There are no photos of subsequent new members; however, it is possible that J.W. Beatty was photographed that November, when he attended meetings of the Academy Council in Montreal.67

One photograph was taken in 1915. A.Y. Jackson returned to Montreal from Toronto in December 1914, awaiting developments in the war that had broken out in September. In June 1915, following the battle of Saint Julien, he enlisted and left for England in the autumn.68 Jackson was a former pupil of Dyonnet’s and was launched on a promising career, and Dyonnet’s wish to photograph him in uniform was undoubtedly spurred by respect for his having enlisted and knowing he faced an uncertain future (no. 14). Among Jackson’s papers is the only known large paper print of a Dyonnet photo.69

The core of the National Gallery album consists of Dyonnet’s portraits, but other photographs are also associated with Dyonnet. In 1910, he was photographed with E. Rimbault Dibdin, curator of the Walker Gallery in Liverpool (no. 52), when Dyonnet accompanied the exhibition of Canadian art organized by the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts for the Festival of Empire in London. When it was cancelled due to the death of King Edward VII, he negotiated its presentation in Liverpool.70 An informal portrait of William Brymner, possibly taken in Dyonnet’s studio (fig. 18), might also be by Dyonnet, as Brymner is wearing the same suit, shirt, and tie as in the Pen and Pencil Club portrait (fig. 19). In another Dyonnet photograph of Brymner (private collection), Brymner handles the Roman Tanagra figure visible on the shelf behind him in this studio portrait. Ovid Gould, whose snapshot shows him sketching out of doors (no. 56), attended the Academy’s life class with Dyonnet in 1898,71 and Dyonnet exhibited a portrait of Ovid Gould in 1901.72

Fig. 18. Attributed to Edmond Dyonnet, William Brymner in a studio, c. 1891–1896, matt silver gelatin print with no border, 12.0 × 9.8 cm. National Gallery of Canada Library and Archives, Ottawa (album #50, p.18 recto). Photo: NGC

Fig. 19. Edmond Dyonnet, William Brymner, c. 1891–1896, silver salts, albumen process, 11.3 × 8 cm. McCord Museum, Montreal, Gift of Mrs. Paul F. Sise (MP-0000-2569.2). Photo: © McCord Museum

Dyonnet’s photographs in the National Gallery album are toned matt prints with thin borders in two sizes, approximately 15.2 × 10.9 cm or approximately 10.4 × 7.8 cm. The matt prints were probably commercially printed, but a number of toned glossy prints of varying dimensions without borders may have been printed by Dyonnet himself. The portraits of artists are mostly matt and are arranged in the front of the album, while the portraits of non-artist members of the Pen and Pencil Club are mostly glossy and arranged in the middle of the album. While nothing is known about where Dyonnet learned photography or what cameras he used, the quality of his portraits is consistently high and gives evidence of the portrait painter’s ability to capture the telling body language of his sitters: the self-assuredness of William Brymner (fig. 19), the eccentric vanity of Horatio Walker (fig. 11), the dramatic flamboyance of Dr. Burgess, psychiatrist at the Verdun psychiatric hospital (no. 67), and the timidity (or ill health) of Arthur Rosaire (no. 9).

The person who assembled the album added a number of other photographs of artists, but no additional portraits of authors. Fifteen are commercially printed black and white photos, and one is an early toned print of R.F. Gagen, by M.O. Hammond (no. 7). These are smaller than the prints Hammond marketed in the late 1920s and include his copies of John Bell-Smith’s painted self-portrait of 1853 (no. 102), William Notman’s photo of the hanging committee of the first exhibition of the Canadian Academy in 1880 (no. 103), and an early photo of Tom Thomson (no. 98). Hammond’s own portraits73 include the group photograph of Dyonnet, Maurice Cullen, and G. Horne Russell taken in 1926 (no. 45).

Exceptionally, the album also contains a black and white glossy photograph, signed by Suzor-Coté, taken by a street photographer in Miami in the 1930s, a photograph of a published article illustrated with a photograph of Suzor-Coté74 (nos. 87, 89), and a photograph of a 1937 portrait by Kenneth Forbes (no. 108).

Of greater interest are a few nineteenth-century prints, including a portrait of the Saint John, NB artist J.C. Miles (no. 3), a posed portrait of William Brymner seated at his easel (no. 51), William Notman’s 1871 photo of William Fraser (no. 48), and the aforementioned group portrait of Harris, Jacobi, and Brymner (no. 106), as well as two lone photographs of women artists: a snapshot of Claire Fauteux playing golf (no. 46) and a studio portrait of the Montreal painter Margaret Houghton holding a palette (no. 47). “Sweet looking at our still life” (no. 109) is inscribed in graphite on the album sheet below a photograph showing the Art Association of Montreal caretaker with a still life by Ulric Lamarche exhibited in the 1897 Spring Exhibition.75

In addition to the album discussed here, the Library and Archives of the National Gallery also owns a number of Dyonnet’s photographs mounted on card, one being glued to the back of a printed invitation to the 1918 RCA exhibition.76 Though their source is unknown, these probably came with the album. The photos include Dyonnet’s photographs of five of his paintings,77 mounted copies of his photographs of Robert Harris, Maurice Cullen, and Homer Watson, identified on the card in an unknown hand, a duplicate of the snapshot of Ovid Gould, and unmounted prints of his photographs of J.W. Beatty, Percy Nobbs, Archibald Browne, and Curtis Williamson, as well as two mounted photographs of the Corot easel, folded and open (see fig. 13).

The predominance of Montreal subjects in the album and the misidentification of a portrait of Fred Haines, a prominent Toronto artist78 (no. 107), suggests that the interest of the album’s compiler related to Montreal. One person who may have been associated with it, possibly adding items to an existing album of Dyonnet’s prints, was Thomas Roche Lee (1915–1977). Lee was editor of the Ingersoll Tribune in 1949 and later mayor of Baie d’Urfé on the west island of Montreal from 1957 to 1961.79 He wrote on Albert Robinson and Daniel Fowler80 and defined himself as “a collector of literature relative to Canadian painting and painters.”81 His collecting interests were wide, and the Art Gallery of Ontario, the National Gallery of Canada, and the McCord Museum all have items he owned. Lee was close to Dyonnet during the artist’s later years, and in 1953 he had the English typescript of Dyonnet’s memoirs retyped and mimeographed in one hundred copies.82 The Thomas Roche Lee collection in the Edward P. Taylor Research Library at the Art Gallery of Ontario83 includes Warwick Chipman’s ode to Dyonnet, “On the Fortieth Anniversary of his Election to the Pen and Pencil Club,” and thirty letters to Dyonnet, suggesting that Lee had access to Dyonnet’s estate. Lee shared Dyonnet’s antipathy to modernism in art, and the Ottawa album includes portraits of other vocal conservatives, such as Kenneth Forbes84 and John Radford of Vancouver (nos. 10 and 104). The predominance of items by and related to Dyonnet in the Ottawa album link it to Dyonnet and through Dyonnet to Lee.85

My thanks to Kathleen Mackinnon, Registrar at the Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Heather McNabb, Reference Archivist at the McCord Museum, Agnieszka Prycik at the Archives de la Ville de Montréal, and Philip Dombowsky in the Library and Archives of the National Gallery of Canada for their assistance in the preparation of this article.

Notes

1 All subjects are identified below the photographs on the album page. Photographs of J.W. Morrice, F.W. Hutchison, Clarence Gagnon, William Brymner, and A.Y. Jackson were removed, presumably before the National Gallery acquired the album.

2 “Un artiste canadien,” La Minerve, October 28, 1890, 11. Louis Frechette, “À propos de peinture,” Le Canada Artistique, vol. I, no. 1 (November 1890), 181 and note on 180. See also Edmond Dyonnet, Memoirs of a Canadian Artist [mimeographed] (Montreal, 1951) and Edmond Dyonnet, Mémoires d’un artiste canadien (Ottawa: Éditions de l’Université d’Ottawa, 1968).

3 Dyonnet, Memoirs, 30 and Dyonnet, Mémoires, 43. Dyonnet’s address in the catalogue of the 1892 Art Association of Montreal Spring Exhibition (opening April 18, 1892) is given as 1000 Dorchester Street. On Maxime Ingres see Robert H. Michel, “‘Easy, Debonair and Brisk’: Maxime Ingres at McGill,” Fontanus, vol. XIII (2013): 131–34.

4 In Lovell’s Montreal Directory (http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna.lovell) for 1894–95 (corrected to June 25, 1894), the Ingres-Coutellier School of Languages is listed at 9 University Street. Dyonnet is listed at 9 University Street in Lovell’s Directory for 1895–96. See also note 13.

5 See Edgar C. Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library: An Informal History (London: Clive Bingley, 1977), 36–64. In the alphabetical directory in Lovell’s Montreal Directory for 1895, the Fraser Institute is listed at 811 Dorchester Street, the library entrance being on Dorchester and the rented spaces at 9 University Street.

6 Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library, 76, 83.

7 Robert Harris, Montreal, to his mother, Charlottetown, September 30, 1888. Robert Harris fonds, Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Gift of the Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAGH-4372). In Lovell’s Montreal Directory for 1890–91 (corrected to June 23, 1890), Harris and Jacobi are listed at the Fraser Institute, 9 University Street.

8 Robert Harris, Montreal to his mother, Charlottetown, 19 October 19, 1890, Robert Harris fonds, Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Gift of the Robert Harris Trust, 1965 (CAGH-4538).

9 All references to meetings of the Pen and Pencil Club are in the club’s Minute Books in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, in the McCord Museum, Montreal (P139). The minute books of the meetings, membership records, scrapbooks, and correspondence are available online at collections.musee-mccord.qc.ca. Boodle was librarian of the Fraser Institute until late 1890. Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library, 78.

10 For a history of the Pen and Pencil Club see Leonard Cox, “Fifty Years of Brush and Pen: A Historical Sketch of the Pen and Pencil Club of Montreal,” Queen’s Quarterly 46, no. 3 (Autumn 1939): 341–47, and Leo Cox and J. Harry Smith, The Pen & Pencil Club 1890–1959 (Montreal: The Pen and Pencil Club, [1959]). This latter publication gives dates of membership but not resignations. There were a number of resignations in the first two years. William Raphael was a member from March 17, 1890 to December 19, 1891, Otto Jacobi from March 17, 1890 to April 18, 1891, J.C. Pinhey from March 17, 1890 to December 19, 1891, A.T. Taylor from March 17 to December 13, 1890, Munsey Seymour from January 10 to December 19, 1891, Dr. W.H. Drummond from January 30 to March 22, 1892, and Joseph Gould from March 12 to October 22, 1892.

11 Pen and Pencil Club members Maxime Ingres and Leigh Gregor were on the Executive Committee of the Fraser Institute from 1898 to 1900 and 1908 to 1912, respectively. Eugène Lafleur, Paul Lafleur’s brother, was active from 1894 to 1930. Moodey, The Fraser–Hickson Library, 211–12. On the overlapping memberships of these various organizations see Hélène Sicotte, “William Brymner: A Remarkably Social Man,” in William Brymner: Artist, Teacher, Colleague (Kingston: Agnes Etherington Art Centre, 2010), 23–33.

12 See minutes of Pen and Pencil Club meetings of October 24, 1913, November 1, 1913, October 21, 1916, October 30, 1937, October 26, 1940, and November 6, 1948, when Percy May is noted as Treasurer for the second year.

13 Pen and Pencil Club Minutes of the meeting of November 10, 1894. This is the first reference to Dyonnet’s studio in the Fraser Institute.

14 Leo Cox, “Fifty Years of Brush and Pen,” in The Pen & Pencil Club 1890–1959 (Montreal, January 1959), n.p. The club met at Dyonnet’s studio at the Fraser institute from October 27, 1894 until November 1910, when the club began to meet in the studio of Alberta Cleland, also in the Fraser Institute. They met in Kenneth Macpherson’s studio at 255 Bleury St. from May 4, 1911 to April 29, 1916 (Macpherson died April 26, 1916). That autumn Dyonnet took over Macpherson’s studio, moving to 255 Bleury St., and meetings continued there until fall 1937. See also minutes of club meetings of October 26, 1940 and May 3, 1947.

15 Edmond Dyonnet, Montreal to E.R. Greig, Toronto, December 30, 1912, E.P. Taylor Research Library & Archives, Art Gallery of Ontario (A3.9.6 Art Museum of Toronto Letters 1912–1920, Box 4 – Royal Canadian Academy of Arts). Fellow artist Edmund Morris shared Dyonnet’s interest in the early history of Canadian art and in January 1911 organized the exhibition Paintings by Deceased Canadian Artists at the Art Museum of Toronto. Dyonnet corrected Morris’s errors in the dates of Paul Peel and Allan Edson. Dyonnet, Montreal to Morris, Toronto, January 30, 1911 (Edgar J. Stone Collection, E.P. Taylor Research Library & Archives, Art Gallery of Ontario).

16 The Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec owns Dyonnet’s portraits of Henri Julien (49.65) and Charles Gill (1938.15), the Art Gallery of Ontario a portrait of Julien (87/203) and Henri Fabien (69/30), the National Gallery of Canada a portrait of Fabien (28119), and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts the portrait of Thomas Carli (1943.778).

17 Maxime Ingres had been nominated for membership in the Pen and Pencil Club by Dyonnet and William Brymner on January 16, 1892.

18 Pen and Pencil Club Minutes, Meeting of March 21, 1896.

19 B.K. Sandwell, Toronto to Edmond Dyonnet, Montreal, June 17, 1950, in Edmond Dyonnet fonds (P9/1/3), Centre de Recherche en Civilisation Canadienne-française, Université d’Ottawa.

20 Accession numbers CAG H-1821 a–zz and CAG H-225. Gift of the Robert Harris Trust, 1965. The dates of membership of the sitters range from 1890 to 1900.

21 The provenance of McCord albums MP-1978.129.1–26 consisting of 26 portraits and MP-1980.197.1-40 (40 portraits) is unknown. MP-1992.1–23 (23 portraits) came from the Estate of Mrs. A. (Adolphe) Lomer, sister of club member Paul T. Lafleur and mother of Gerhard Lomer, McGill’s head librarian 1920–48. MP-0000-2569.1–21 (21 portraits) was a gift of Mrs. Paul F. Sise, daughter of club member Charles Porteous.

22 Leo-Paul Desrosiers, Conservateur, Bibliothèque, Ville de Montréal to E. Dyonnet, Montreal, September 20, 1951. Desrosiers acknowledges receipt of a typed copy of Dyonnet’s memoirs and writes, “Nous avons d’ailleurs, à la Bibliothèque, une belle collection que vous nous avez donné” (Edmond Dyonnet fonds, P9/1/3–23). There is a photocopy of the Archives album, plus some original photos mounted on card in the Edmond Dyonnet fonds at the Université d’Ottawa.

23 The glass negatives come in two sizes, approximately 12.5 × 10 cm and 16.5 × 12 cm, though dimensions are not consistent. The dimensions of the plate do not appear to relate to the dating of the portraits.

24 See Global Affairs Canada website, available at http://w05.international.gc.ca/HeadsOfPost. See also the minutes of club meetings of February 28, 1942 and November 28, 1942.

25 Dr. Henri Lafleur was a brother of prominent club member Paul T. Lafleur. Both taught at McGill University. On the Lafleur family members, see Madeleine Landry, Beaupré 1896–1904: Lieu d’inspiration d’une peinture identitaire (Québec: Septentrion, 2014), 40–43.

26 Gustave Hahn (for Gustav), Alphonse Jougers (for Jongers), MacPhail (for Macphail), MacPherson (for Macpherson), G.R. Matthews (for R.G. Mathews), A. Dickson Paterson (for Patterson), E. Horne Russell (for G. Horne Russell), W. Lt. Thomas Smith (for St. Thomas Smith), Dr. R. Tait-McKenzie [for R. Tait McKenzie], and J.C. Way (for C.J. Way).

27 Members were first elected Associates of the Academy (A.R.C.A.) and could subsequently be elected full members (R.C.A.) when a vacancy arose in the maximum membership of forty members. Edmund Morris is identified as R.C.A., when he was only A.R.C.A., elected in 1898. Similarly A.D. Rosaire, R.C.A. was an A.R.C.A., elected in 1914. W. St. Thomas Smith, was elected A.R.C.A. in 1902. A transcription carried over from a previous photograph of Dean Walton, Dean of Law at McGill, identifies one of two portraits of Homer Watson as “Homer Watson, R.C.A. professeur au McGill Univ.”

28 I have not seen these prints and know of them only from scanned printouts. Each is mounted on card and sitters are identified in an unknown, printed hand.

29 William Brymner, Robert Harris, William Hope, John Logan, John Try Davies, Paul Lafleur William McLennan, John Pinhey, Norman Rielle, Forbes Torrance, and Otto Jacobi.

30 The following members elected between 1890 and 1914, some being members only briefly, were not photographed: R.W. Boodle, E.B. Brownlow, E. Colonna, S.E. Dawson, Louis Fréchette, Dean Moyse, William Raphael , A.T. Taylor, Percy Woodcock, William Van Horne, Ivan Wotherspoon, Munsey Seymour, Archdeacon F.G. Scott, Dr. W.H. Drummond, Joseph Gould, Prof. John Cox, F.C.V. Ede, J. McD. Oxley, A.J. Glazebrook , J.B. Hance, E.W. Thompson, B.K. Sandwell, Charles J. Saxe, James McLennan, Albert H. Robinson, J.E. Hoare, J.B. Fitzmaurice, Prof. F.E. Lloyd, A. Campbell Geddes, Prof. René De Roure, and Hon. Justice E.F. Surveyer.

31 These include members William Brymner, Warwick Chipman, Maurice Cullen, Alphonse Jongers, Paul Lafleur , K.R. Macpherson, Percy Nobbs, and Charles Porteous and non-members Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté, Homer Watson, and Curtis Williamson. There are five self-portraits by Dyonnet. See figs. 3 and 12 and nos. 11, 54, 69.

32 Otto Jacobi, Toronto to J. Try Davies, Montreal, April 15, 1891 (Pen and Pencil Club scrapbook I, p. 229).

33 In Lovell’s Montreal Directory for 1890–91 (corrected to June 23, 1890), Jacobi is listed as “artist, Fraser Institute, 9 University, h. 2441 St. Catherine.”

34 O.R. Jacobi, Summerhill Ave., Toronto North to Paul T. Lafleur, Montreal, May 15, 1896 (Pen & Pencil Club Papers, Correspondence, Box 1). On the verso of the card bearing his photograph in the Confederation Art Gallery (CAG H-1821zz), Jacobi wrote, “Otto Reinhold Jacobi, geb. on the 27th of February 1812, now/84 years old. I was born in Königsberg in East Prussia, and/took very early to painting. And frequented our royal Art school there,/15 years old I was engaged teacher in the Deaf and Dumb Institute/with a good salary for a full year, and succeeded so well, that they/promised to raise my salary, if I would stay; but I had greater/things in my mind, and whent with the help of my late fathers/friends, who was a free mason of some merits, to Berlin to the Acade-/my where I was well received by good introductions of my fathers/friends. I studied there for two years, and on the third year I entered/a competition for 3 years competition to send to the Düsseldorf/Academy; we were about 12 competitors; each had to paint in the/Gallery one oil painting – best Landscape – one a life size Portrait/and one oil of his own invention, and several other things./I succeeded in winning the capital Prize of thousand Dollars in 1832/whent then to Düsseldorf, staid there with our best Artists for 9 years./Was then recommended to the Duke of Nassau, who was please to give/me the degree as Professor and Court painter, where I remained in Wiesbaden/till I went in 1860 on invitation, to paint the reception of the Prince/of Wales a picture: the Showenagan falls of tree Rivers.”

35 The following subjects (with dates of membership) were photographed against the folding screen: Edward Arthy (December 17, 1892—no. 80), William Brymner (March 5, 1890—fig. 19), Dr. T.W. Burgess (November 25, 1894—no. 67), Maurice Cullen (November 14, 1896—no. 36), Edmond Dyonnet (February 7, 1891—fig. 3), Robert Harris (March 5, 1890—no. 6) William Hope (March 5, 1890—no. 37), Max Ingres (January 30, 1892—no. 90), Alphonse Jongers (October 31, 1896—no. 16), Paul Lafleur (March 17, 1890—no. 61), John E. Logan (March 5, 1890—no. 60), William McLennan (March 17, 1890—no. 66), K.R. Macpherson (January 16, 1892—no. 74), George Murray (January 11, 1896—no. 63), John O’Flaherty (January 11, 1896—no. 81), John C. Pinhey (March 17, 1890—no. 13), C.E.L. Porteous (November 19, 1892—no. 85), Norman T. Rielle (March 17, 1890—no. 65), Forbes Torrance (March 17, 1890—no. 71), W. Townsend (March 3, 1895—no. 91), John Try-Davies (March 5, 1890—no. 59).

36 Cruikshank (no. 2), Moss (fig. 10), Walker (fig. 11). The photograph of Dr. Henri Lafleur is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P043). A copy of Dyonnet’s photograph of Joseph Saint-Charles is in the M.O. Hammond fonds, Archives of Ontario, F1075-12-0-0-60.

37 On the armoires see Jean Chauvin, “Edmond Dyonnet,” in Ateliers (Montreal and New York: Louis Carrier, 1928), 193; J. Harry Smith, “Dyonnet & Canadian Art,” Saturday Night, September 18, 1948, 20. Dyonnet might have inherited the armoires following the death of his father in 1900. See Dyonnet to Charles Porteous, March 6, 1900 (Porteous Papers LAC), and Minutes of the Pen and Pencil Club meeting of March 10, 1900.

38 Prints of Dyonnet’s photograph of Frank Houghton are in the Confederation Centre Art Gallery (H-1821v), the Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P034), and the McCord Museum (MP-1978.129.10, MP-1980.197.34, MP-1992.11.6 and MP-0000-2569.8). A print and negative of Dyonnet’s portrait of Morrice is in the Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P052).

39 Lovell’s Montreal Directory 1902–03 corrected to June 20, 1902.

40 Julien was nominated for membership by Dyonnet, December 19, 1891.

41 See “Sur les traces de Guillaume Couture,” www.archiv.umontreal.ca/pdf/CoutureG.pdf.

42 In Lovell’s Montreal Directories from 1903–04 to 1909–10, Couture is listed at 58 University Street with Paul Lafleur and Dr. Henri Lafleur. In the 1910–11, directory he is listed at Fraser Institute Hall.

43 Compare the photographs reproduced in E.F.B. Johnston, “Art and the Work of Archibald Browne,” The Canadian Magazine, vol. XXXI, no. 6 (October 1908): 529 and that in Saturday Night, vol. XXXIII, no. 8 (December 6, 1919): 3.

44 Dyonnet, Mémoires, 47 names Joseph Franchère, Joseph St. Charles, and Charles Gill as his assistants. In the Council’s annual reports, published in the annual reports of the Ministry of Agriculture of the Province of Quebec, Charles Huot is listed as teaching in the Quebec City school of the Council of Arts and Manufactures from 1894, Saint-Charles in the Montreal school from 1898, Joseph Franchère from 1899, and Louis-Philippe Hébert from 1895 to 1898. See Daniel Drouin, “Chronologie,” in Louis-Philippe Hébert, ed. Daniel Drouin (Quebec: Musée du Québec, 2001), 332–33.

45 Lovell’s Montreal Directory: 1897–1898 (corrected to June 25, 1897) lists Alphonse Jongers at 9 University Street; 1899–1900 (corrected to June 27, 1899) lists C.J. Way. In the catalogue of the March 8–23, 1901 Art Association of Montreal Spring Exhibition, Henri Beau’s address is given as 9 University Street. Beau was elected a member of the Pen and Pencil Club on November 7, 1903. Dyonnet’s photograph of Henri Beau is in the Pen and Pencil Club fonds, Archives de la Ville de Montréal (BM83_2P003).

46 Fabien’s identity card for the 1900 Paris Exposition is in the Henri Fabien fonds, Centre de Recherche en Civilisation canadienne-française, Université d’Ottawa (Ph28-B8). “Correspondance Parisienne,” La Patrie, dated Paris April 1, 1902 (P28 1/2), notes his upcoming return to Canada in June. In photographs in the same fonds, identified as taken in his Montreal studio, Fabien is beardless (Ph28-B14 and Ph28-B15). He moved to Ottawa in 1905.

47 See the Annual Reports of the Art Association of Montreal for the years 1892 to 1900.

48 “Art Notes,” Saturday Night, September 28, 1895, 9.

49 Undated entry in Edmund Morris Diary, Edmund Montague Morris fonds, Queen’s University Archives. William Cruikshank, Toronto to Edmund Morris, Hillhurst, October 10, 1898 (Edward J. Stone Collection 4–6, E.P. Taylor Research Library and Archives, Art Gallery of Ontario).

50 The canvas Dyonnet is painting is illustrated in the view of his studio in “Some Representative Canadian Sculptors and Painters,” Montreal Daily Witness, April 2, 1898 and captioned as “ on exhibition at the Art Gallery.” The painting is A Yoke of Oxen, exhibited at the Art Association of Montreal Spring Exhibition from April 4, 1898.

51 Regarding their efforts to patent and sell the Corot easel, see Charles Porteous fonds, Library & Archives Canada (R7381-0-0-E): Henry A. Budden to E. Dyonnet, Montreal, February 26, 1898 and Charles Porteous to Dyonnet, Beaupré, June 12, 1898 (letter book 20 chronological); Dyonnet, Montreal to Porteous, June 20, 1898; Porteous to J.D. Smith, Artists Supplies, London, November 23, 1899 (letter book 21 chronological); Dyonnet to Porteous, March 6, 1900, Porteous to Donald Robb, London, England, March 17, 1900 and Porteous to D. Robb, London, April 17, 1900 (letter book 22, chronological); D. Robb, London to Porteous, June 13, 1900 (vol. 8 chronological); Porteous to D. Robb, June 29, 1900 (letter book 22 chronological); and Dyonnet to Porteous, October 6, 1903 (vol. 11 chronological).

52 M.J. Mount, “Joseph Franchère and his Work,” The Canadian Century II, no. 4 (July 30, 1910): 12.

53 The Year Book of Canadian Art 1913 (Toronto: J.M. Dent & Sons, Limited, 1913), opposite p. 220.

54 Albert Laberge, Peintres et Écrivains d’Hier et d’Aujourd’hui (Montreal: Édition privée, 1938), opposite pp. 29, 36, 44.

55 Albert Laberge, Journalistes, Écrivains et Artistes (Montreal: Édition privée, 1945), opposite p. 184.

56 See minutes of Pen and Pencil Club meetings of October 20, 1904, October 14, and December 23, 1905, and January 6 and February 17, 1906. The unveiling of the bust is recorded in the minutes of the meeting of February 9, 1907. The bust is dated 1905.

57